Sidh Gosti

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Sidh Gosti
by Guru Nanak
Original titleRamkali Mahalla 1, Sidh Gosti
WrittenAchal Batala, Mid 16th Century
First published inAdi Granth, 1604
CountryIndia
LanguageGurmukhi
Subject(s)Spiritual Discussion
Genre(s)Religion
MeterRamkali
Lines73 Stanzas
Pages938/946
Preceded byDakhani Oankaru (ਰਾਮਕਲੀ ਮਹਲਾ ੧ ਦਖਣੀ ਓਅੰਕਾਰੁ )
Followed byRamkali Ki Vaar M3 (ਰਾਮਕਲੀ ਕੀ ਵਾਰ ਮਹਲਾ ੩)

Sidh Gosti(Gurmukhi:ਸਿਧ ਗੋਸਟਿ) is famous spiritual interfaith dialogue[1] between Guru Nanak and Hindu Siddhas. [2] The composition is present from page 938 to 946 in Adi Granth.[3][4] Composition have 73 Stanzas,[5] written in Ramkali Raga. Prominent Sidh and Naths present during disccusion were Charpatnath, Bhangarnath and Loharipa .[6] The popular belief is that this discourse happened at Achal Batala.[7] Other than that Guru Nanak had discourses with Sidhas at various places mainly at Gorakhmatta, Achal Batala and Mount Meru. The discussion explains differences of Gurmat with Yog.[8]

Sidh Gosti is also pronounced as Sidh Goshti or Sidh Gosht or Sidh Gosat.

Content[edit]

The discussion explains differences of Gurmat with Yog.[8] During the discussion with Siddhas, Guru Nanak explains that renunciation and austerities are not essential for achieving salvation.[9] For eg: Consider the following hymns which explain the differences between the two paths.

Yogi Loharipa says

Away from stores and highways, we live in the woods, among plants and trees. For food, we take fruits and roots. This is the spiritual wisdom spoken by the renunciates. We bathe at sacred shrines of pilgrimage, and obtain the fruits of peace; not even an iota of filth sticks to us. This is the Way of Yoga.

— Guru Granth Sahib 938 [10]

Guru Nanak responds

In the stores and on the road, do not sleep; do not let your consciousness covet anyone else's home. Without the Name, the mind has no firm support; O Nanak, this hunger never departs. The Guru has revealed the stores and the city within the home of my own heart, where I intuitively carry on the true trade. Sleep little, and eat little; O Nanak, this is the essence of wisdom.

— Guru Granth Sahib 939 [11]

Yogi Loharipa says

Wear the robes of the sect of Yogis who follow Gorakh; put on the ear-rings, begging wallet and patched coat. Among the twelve schools of Yoga, ours is the highest; among the six schools of philosophy, ours is the best path. This is the way to instruct the mind, so you will never suffer beatings again.

— Guru Granth Sahib 939 [11]

Guru Nanak responds

Following is the way that Yoga is attained. Let constant absorption in the Word of the Shabad deep within be your ear-rings; eradicate egotism and attachment. Discard sexual desire, anger and egotism, and through the Word of the Guru's Shabad, attain true understanding. For your patched coat and begging bowl, see the Lord God pervading and permeating everywhere; O Nanak, the One Lord will carry you across. True is our Lord and Master, and True is His Name. Analyze it, and you shall find the Word of the Guru to be True. Let your mind turn away in detachment from the world, and let this be your begging bowl. Let the lessons of the five elements be your cap. Let the body be your meditation mat, and the mind your loin cloth. Let truth, contentment and self-discipline be your companions. O Nanak, the Gurmukh dwells on the Naam, the Name of the Lord.

— Guru Granth Sahib 939 [11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Knitter, Paul F. (2005). The Myth of Religious Superiority: Multifaith Explorations of Religious Pluralism. Orbis Books. ISBN 9781608332069.
  2. ^ Rattan, Mohan Singh (1989). Sidh Gosti-ik sarab pakhi adhyan. Lahore Book Shop.
  3. ^ Singh, Prithi Pal (Jan 1, 2006). The History of Sikh Gurus. Lotus Press. p. 16.
  4. ^ ਰਾਮਕਲੀ ਮਹਲਾ ੧ ਸਿਧ ਗੋਸਟਿ: Guru Granth Sahib: Page 938/946:
  5. ^ Kapoor, Sukhbir (Jan 1, 2005). Guru Granth Sahib - An Advance Study Volume-I. Hemkunt Press. p. 118.
  6. ^ Loharipa Yogi Pleads: Sidh gosti: Farser, George S. (Jan 1, 2000). Selections from the Sacred Writings of the Sikhs. Orient Blackswan. p. 100.
  7. ^ The Sikh Review, Volume 41, Issues 469-480. Sikh Cultural Centre. 1993. p. 14.
  8. ^ a b Nihang, Dharam Singh (1996). Sahij Samadhi Banaam Sunn Samadhi. Sachkhoj Academy. p. 3.
  9. ^ Nirmal Singh (2008). Searches in Sikhism. Hemkunt Publishers. p. 127. ISBN 978-81-7010-367-7.
  10. ^ "Sri Granth: Sri Guru Granth Sahib".
  11. ^ a b c "Sri Granth: Sri Guru Granth Sahib".