Sidney Meyrick

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Sir Sidney Meyrick
Born 28 March 1879
Died 18 December 1973 (1973-12-19) (aged 94)
Chichester, Sussex
Allegiance United Kingdom United Kingdom
Service/branch Naval Ensign of the United Kingdom.svg Royal Navy
Years of service 1893–1940
Rank Vice Admiral
Commands held HMS Courageous
6th Destroyer Flotilla
HMS Revenge
HMS Nelson
2nd Cruiser Squadron
Naval Secretary
America and West Indies Station
Battles/wars First World War
Second World War
Awards Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath

Admiral Sir Sidney Julius Meyrick KCB (28 March 1879 – 18 December 1973) was a Royal Navy officer who went on to be Commander-in-Chief, America and West Indies Station.

Naval career[edit]

Meyrick joined the Royal Navy in 1893. He served in the First World War in HMS Erin and then in HMS Resolution in the Grand Fleet.[1]

After the War he became Flag Captain commanding HMS Courageous and Chief Staff Officer to the Commander-in-Chief of the Reserve Fleet in 1920 and then moved on to be Commander of the 6th Destroyer Flotilla in 1921.[1] He was made Flag Captain commanding HMS Revenge and Chief Staff Officer to the Commander-in-Chief of the Atlantic Fleet in 1922.[1]

He joined the Staff of Royal Naval College at Greenwich in 1923 and became Director of Training and Staff Duties at the Admiralty in 1926.[1] He was appointed Flag Captain commanding HMS Nelson and Captain of the Fleet to the Commander-in-Chief of the Atlantic Fleet in 1927 before becoming Captain of the Royal Naval College, Dartmouth in 1929 and Naval Secretary in 1932.[1] He was then made Commander of the 2nd Cruiser Squadron in 1934 and Commander-in-Chief, America and West Indies Station in 1937.[1]

At the start of the Second World War, formations under Meyrick's command as Commander-in-Chief, America and West Indies Station, included the 8th Cruiser Squadron and two escort ships.[2] In 1940 he was credited with forcing the Captain of the German liner Columbus to scuttle his ship.[3] He retired in 1940.[1]

He died at the family home and estate, Norton House, near Chichester in Sussex.[4]

Family[edit]

In 1901 he married Judith Fullerton, the daughter of Admiral Sir John Fullerton;[5] they had three sons, named Timothy, Michael and Peter.[4]

References[edit]

Military offices
Preceded by
George Chetwode
Naval Secretary
1932–1934
Succeeded by
Guy Royle
Preceded by
Sir Matthew Best
Commander-in-Chief, America and West Indies Station
1937–1940
Succeeded by
Sir Charles Kennedy-Purvis