Page semi-protected

Sidney Powell

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Sidney Powell
Born1955 (age 64–65)
EducationUniversity of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (BA, JD)
OccupationAttorney
Years active1978–present
WebsiteOfficial website

Sidney Katherine Powell (born 1955)[1] is an American attorney and former federal prosecutor.

After graduating from law school in 1978, Powell began her career as an assistant United States attorney in the Western District of Texas. During her tenure she prosecuted Jimmy Chagra.[2] In 1988, she ceased working as a prosecutor and, in 1993, established her own firm. She has acted in appellate matters as a prosecutor and defense counsel.[3][2] She represented executives in the Enron scandal,[4] and in 2019, defended General Michael Flynn in United States v. Flynn.[5]

In 2020, Powell joined the legal team of President Donald Trump in an attempt to overturn President-elect Joe Biden's victory over Trump in the 2020 presidential election. After several interviews in which Powell spread additional election fraud conspiracy theories, the president's legal team formally distanced itself from her, stating she was "practicing law on her own" and was not a member of the team.[6][7][6]

Powell has promoted numerous conspiracy theories. She has claimed that Flynn was framed by a covert "deep state" operation,[5][8] and has also promoted personalities and slogans associated with the QAnon conspiracy theory. In regards to the 2020 presidential election, Powell alleges that a secret international cabal involving communists, "globalists", George Soros, Hugo Chávez, the Clinton Foundation, the CIA, and thousands of Democratic and Republican officials, including Trump ally and Georgia governor Brian Kemp, used voting machines to transfer millions of votes away from Donald Trump to Joe Biden.[9][10][11] Powell has also baselessly accused other Republican and Democratic candidates of paying bribes to the Dominion Voting Systems Corporation, so as to ensure the tabulation of votes is rigged in their favor.[12]

Early life

Sidney Katherine Powell was born into a working-class family in Durham, North Carolina, grew up in the city of Raleigh,[13][third-party source needed] and knew from an early age that she wanted to be a lawyer. She graduated from Needham Broughton High School and went on to attend the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she earned a Bachelor of Arts.[5] At the age of 19, she was accepted into the University of North Carolina School of Law, where she graduated in 1978 with a Juris Doctor degree.[14] She began her legal career as one of the youngest federal prosecutors in the US.[15]

Legal career

From 1978 through 1988, Powell served as an assistant United States attorney for the Western and Northern Districts of Texas and the Eastern District of Virginia, where she handled civil and criminal trial work. She was appointed Appellate Section Chief for the Western District of Texas and then the Northern District of Texas.[16][third-party source needed]

In 1993, Powell established her own law firm in Dallas, Texas.[2]

Notable cases

Assassination of Judge John H. Wood

In 1979, Powell was one of the prosecutors in the trial of Jimmy Chagra, in which he was convicted of continuing criminal violations.[16][third-party source needed]

Enron scandal

Powell spent nearly a decade in the 2000s representing firms and executives involved in the Enron scandal, including the accounting firm Arthur Andersen and former Merrill Lynch executive Jim Brown.[4] Powell became an outspoken critic of the Enron Task Force prosecutions, and especially accused prosecutor Andrew Weissmann of overreach.[17] After this experience, Powell went on to write extensively about prosecutorial abuses; namely, the 2014 book "Licensed to Lie".[5] The book was noticed by then-Senator Orrin Hatch, who described it as "powerful".[18]

Views

Michael Flynn

After publishing her first book, Powell continued writing opinion pieces for right-leaning websites.[19][20][18] In 2017, Weissmann was selected to join Robert Mueller's Special Counsel Investigation, reviving interest in Licensed to Lie from Newt Gingrich and Sean Hannity.[18] Using her status as a former federal prosecutor, Powell became a leading voice against the Mueller Probe;[18] in a February 2018 op-ed, Powell wrote that General Michael Flynn should "withdraw his guilty plea" for making false statements to the FBI, alleging "egregious government misconduct".[8] Powell's appearances on Fox News to discuss the Flynn case were noticed by President Donald Trump, and the two spoke on several occasions. In November 2018, Powell spoke at a conference to raise money for Flynn's defense, where she met Flynn's siblings.[5] They agreed that Flynn was the victim of a "deep state plot", and had only pled guilty because he was coerced.[5]

In June 2019, Michael Flynn released his law firm of Covington & Burling, and retained Powell to serve as his lead attorney.[5] On the same day this was disclosed, Powell sent a letter to Attorney General William Barr requesting the "utmost confidentiality" and argued that Flynn's prosecution was due to "corruption of our beloved government institutions for what appears to be political purposes."[21] Among other things, she requested that Barr appoint an outsider to investigate. Six months later, Barr appointed Jeffrey Jensen to conduct such an investigation.[22]

In May 2020, the Justice Department filed a motion with presiding federal judge Emmett Sullivan to drop Flynn's prosecution.[23] Sullivan did not immediately grant the motion, and Powell later requested a writ of mandamus from the DC Circuit Court of Appeals to compel Sullivan to drop the case. After an initial ruling in favor of Powell by a three-judge panel of the Court, the case was appealed to the full Court, which denied the mandamus request in an 8–2 ruling, returning the case to Sullivan's court.[24] Powell had argued to the full Court that Sullivan's role was "ministerial," giving him no discretion but to comply with the Justice Department motion, to which judge Thomas Griffith replied, "It's not ministerial and you know it's not. So it's not ministerial, so that means that the judge has to do some thinking about it, right?"[25] Other judges on the Court also pushed back on Powell's characterization of a federal judge's role.[26]

Soon after taking the Flynn case, Powell had accused the Justice Department of prosecutorial misconduct against Flynn; in a footnote to a June 2020 court brief, the department described Powell's allegations as "unfounded and provide no basis for impugning the prosecutors from the D.C. United States Attorney's Office."[5][27]

Ultimately, in November 2020, President Trump issued a pardon for Flynn. According to a Justice Department official, the Justice Department was not consulted on the pardon.[28]

Powell has been described as a proponent of conspiracy theories about Flynn, namely that he had been framed by members of the "deep state" who were trying to eject President Donald Trump from office.[5][8][18]

2020 presidential election

Days before the 2020 presidential election, Dennis Montgomery, a software designer with a history of making dubious claims, asserted that a government supercomputer program would be used to switch votes from Trump to Biden on voting machines. Powell promoted the conspiracy theory on Lou Dobbs Tonight on November 6,[29][30] and again two days later on Maria Bartiromo's Fox Business program, claiming to have "evidence that that is exactly what happened."[31] She also asserted that the CIA ignored warnings about the software, and urged Trump to fire director Gina Haspel.[32] Christopher Krebs, director of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), characterized the supercomputer claim as "nonsense" and a "hoax."[33][34] CISA described the 2020 election as "the most secure in American history," with "no evidence that any voting system deleted or lost votes, changed votes or was in any way compromised."[33][34] Trump claimed Krebs's analysis was "highly inaccurate" and Krebs was later fired by tweet.[35]

In the wake of the election, President Donald Trump established a legal team to challenge the legitimacy of the results.[36] On November 14, Trump named Rudy Giuliani to lead the team, with Joseph diGenova, Victoria Toensing, Jenna Ellis, and Powell as members of this team.[37] The team proceeded to file numerous lawsuits in several states over alleged vote harvesting, illegal votes, machine errors, vote dumps, and late-counted votes. Precisely how Powell gained prominence in the legal team is unknown, even to some campaign officials. One official claimed Powell "simply showed up at headquarters".[18]

Holding a press conference on November 19, Giuliani and Powell alleged multiple instances of voter fraud in key states.[38] They cited an affidavit - filed by Russell Ramsland and L. Lin Wood, on behalf of the Trump campaign[39] - as evidence of manipulated results. In its comparison of votes cast in Michigan, against total voters registered, Powell asserted that they found over-voting of "up to 350 percent in some places."[38] However, the affidavit's conclusion was erroneous; it had compared the Michigan vote tallies against population data from Minnesota (whose respective abbreviations are MI and MN, a possible source of the error).[39][40] When the The Washington Post independently checked the numbers, no voter discrepancies were found.[38] When questioned the next day, Wood described this as "a simple mistake" and said the affidavit "will be corrected if it hasn't been already".[39]

After Giuliani's segment ended, Powell took the lectern and alleged, without evidence, that an international Communist plot had been engineered by Venezuela, Cuba, China, Hugo Chávez (who died in 2013), George Soros, and the Clinton Foundation, to rig the 2020 election.[10][41] She also alleged that Dominion Voting Systems "can set and run an algorithm that probably ran all over the country to take a certain percentage of votes from President Trump and flip them to President Biden."[42] The source for many of these claims appeared to be far right news organization One America News Network (OANN).[10] She also repeated a conspiracy theory[43] spread by Congressman Louie Gohmert, OANN and others:[44] that accurate voting results had been transmitted to the German office of the Spanish electronic voting firm Scytl, where they were tabulated to reveal a landslide victory for Trump, after which a company server was supposedly seized in a raid by the United States Army.[10] The US Army and Scytl refuted these claims:[45] Scytl has not had any offices in Germany since September 2019, and does not tabulate US votes.[46][47]

Later that evening on his Fox News program Tucker Carlson Tonight, conservative commentator Tucker Carlson said he had invited Powell onto the show to provide proof of her allegations. According to Carlson, after repeated requests, Powell became angry and said to "stop contacting her". Carlson's team contacted other figures in the Trump campaign, who said that Powell had given them no evidence for her allegations.[48]

In a subsequent interview with Newsmax on November 21,[49] Powell accused Georgia's Republican governor, Brian Kemp, of being "in on the Dominion scam" and suggested financial impropriety.[50] Powell additionally alleged that fraud had cost Doug Collins the nonpartisan blanket primary against incumbent Kelly Loeffler in the Senate race in Georgia.[51] She also claimed the Democratic Party had used rigged Dominion machines to defeat Bernie Sanders in the 2016 primary, and that Sanders learned of this but "sold out."[52] She stated she would "blow up" Georgia with a "biblical" court filing.[53] Powell suggested that candidates "paid to have the system rigged to work for them."[54] On the basis of these claims, Powell called for Republican-controlled state legislatures in swing states to disregard the election results and appoint a slate of "loyal" electors who would vote to re-elect President Trump,[55] based on authority supposedly resting in Article Two of the Constitution.[56]

On November 22, 2020, Giuliani and Ellis issued a statement that Powell was "practicing law on her own" and was not (or was no longer) a part of the Trump legal team.[57][58][59] According to The Washington Post, the Trump campaign cut ties with Powell because she was seen as harming Trump's broader legal efforts, and because President Trump disliked the coverage she received from Tucker Carlson Tonight.[60] Shortly after the announcement, her client Michael Flynn tweeted that Twitter had suspended her account for twelve hours, and that she agreed with the campaign's announcement, and was "staying the course" to prove election fraud.[61] On November 26, Dominion Voting Systems released a statement refuting Powell's claims of fraud.[62][18]

Independent election lawsuits

Upon leaving the president's legal team, Powell was embraced by QAnon followers, many of whom had become discouraged that years of predictions of a Trump landslide victory and coming revelations about his enemies had not materalized.[63][64] Powell continued to file election lawsuits on her own. While working for Trump, Powell stated she would "release the Kraken", a catchphrase from a 1981 film, Clash of the Titans, and the expression spread across Twitter.

Two people indicated that they had been included as plaintiffs in election-related lawsuits Powell brought, despite them not having given permission to be included. Derrick Van Orden, an unsuccessful Republican candidate for Congress, stated that he only "learned through social media" that he had been included in Powell's Wisconsin lawsuit.[65] Jason Shepherd, the Republican Party Chairman of Cobb County, GA, said he had not agreed to join Powell's Georgia lawsuit when it was first filed (Shepherd later on agreed to stay on as a plaintiff).[66][67]

As part of her evidence in the Georgia lawsuit, Powell included an affidavit from Ron Watkins, a former administrator of 8chan/8kun; the online home of QAnon. In his affidavit, Watkins stated that his reading of an online user guide for Dominion Voting Systems software led him to conclude that election fraud might be "within the realm of possibility". Watkins did not provide any legitimate evidence of fraud.[68] Also in the Georgia lawsuit, Powell claimed that "a certificate from the [Georgia] Secretary of State was awarded to Dominion Voting Systems but is undated", however, the attached certificate had been apparently edited to remove the date (the actual certificate is dated and available publicly).[67][69]

As part of her evidence in the Michigan lawsuit, Powell submitted her witness' declaration that Joe Biden had "received more than 100% of the votes" in Edison County; however, there is no Edison County anywhere in Michigan, nor any other state in the United States.[70][71] There is, however, an Edison Township in Swift County, Minnesota, leading to speculation that the information was taken from a list of Minnesota precincts.[72]

Powell's Wisconsin lawsuit attempted to secure an "expedited" injunction, yet Powell's initial filings did not "indicate whether the plaintiffs are asking the court to act more quickly or why", stated the presiding district judge.[67] Powell's initial filings also saw no schedule proposed, and no hearing requested, added the judge.[67] Additionally, Powell's Wisconsin lawsuit demanded the release of video footage from a voting center in the state of Michigan.[67] Mistaken references were also made to the election in the state of Georgia, and the Georgia legislature, in the Wisconsin lawsuit.[67]

QAnon

Powell has been described by some sources as a supporter of the QAnon conspiracy theory,[73][74] a far-right conspiracy theory which alleges that a cabal of Satan-worshipping pedophiles is running a global child sex-trafficking ring and plotting against President Donald Trump, who is fighting the cabal.[75] Powell has retweeted major QAnon accounts and catchphrases and appeared on QAnon shows on YouTube,[74] but has denied knowledge of QAnon.[5]

Legal Defense Fund for the American Republic

In November 2020, Powell established Legal Defense Fund for the American Republic, a 501(c)(4) nonprofit organization with stated purpose to collect funds to help prosecute fraud in U.S. elections.[76]

Writing

Powell has written opinion pieces for The New York Observer, The Daily Caller, The Hill, National Review,[19] Fox News, and other news outlets.[77][20] She has published two books:

  • Powell, Sidney K. (May 1, 2014). Licensed to Lie: Exposing Corruption in the Department of Justice. Brown Books. ISBN 978-1-61254-149-5. OCLC 870288205.[78]
  • Powell, Sidney K.; Silverglate, Harvey A. (February 18, 2020). Conviction Machine: Standing Up to Federal Prosecutorial Abuse. Encounter Books. ISBN 978-1-59403-803-7. OCLC 1104857327.

In addition, Powell has published several journal articles on law practice. Examples include:

Personal life and other ventures

Powell has a son from a former marriage. In 2004, she founded a non-profit for victims of domestic violence.[15] She has participated in volunteer work for women's shelters and other charities.[5] Powell served as producer on the drama Decoding Annie Parker (2013), providing guidance to help bring the film to a commercial release. The film tells the story of Annie Parker[79] and the discovery of the BRCA1 breast cancer gene. The film went on to raise millions of dollars for cancer charities.[80] Prior to 2018, Powell was not recalled as "very political".[15]

References

  1. ^ "Powell, Sidney K." Archived from the original on November 20, 2020. Retrieved November 16, 2020.
  2. ^ a b c "5 things to know about Sidney Powell, the Dallas lawyer formerly on Trump's legal team". Dallas News. November 23, 2020.
  3. ^ Peters, Jeremy W.; Feuer, Alan (November 23, 2020). "What We Know About Sidney Powell, the Lawyer Behind Wild Voting Conspiracy Theories". The New York Times.
  4. ^ a b Wisenberg, S.L. (October 27, 2014). "Too Much Skin in the Game? A Review of Sidney Powell's Licensed To Lie". Archived from the original on November 12, 2020. Retrieved November 20, 2020.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Kloor, Keith. "The #MAGA Lawyer Behind Michael Flynn's Scorched-Earth Legal Strategy". POLITICO. Archived from the original on November 15, 2020. Retrieved November 15, 2020.
  6. ^ a b Wolfe, Jan (November 22, 2020). "Trump campaign says Sidney Powell not a member of legal team". Reuters.
  7. ^ Bowden, John (November 22, 2020). "Giuliani distances Trump campaign from attorney Sidney Powell". The Hill. Retrieved November 22, 2020.
  8. ^ a b c "Michael Flynn hires Dallas lawyer Sidney Powell, a conspiracy theorist who calls Mueller a 'creep'". Dallas News. June 12, 2019. Archived from the original on November 17, 2020. Retrieved November 20, 2020.
  9. ^ Walsh, Joe (November 20, 2020). "Who Is Sidney Powell? Meet Trump's New Top Conspiracy Theorist". Forbes. Archived from the original on November 21, 2020. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  10. ^ a b c d Bump, Philip. "Here's how seriously you should take the Trump legal team's conspiracy theories". Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Archived from the original on November 20, 2020. Retrieved November 20, 2020.
  11. ^ Qiu, Linda (November 19, 2020). "How Sidney Powell inaccurately cited Venezuela's elections as evidence of U.S. fraud". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 19, 2020. Retrieved November 20, 2020.
  12. ^ Vella, Lauren (November 19, 2020). "Ernst: Trump lawyer claim that candidates pay to rig elections 'absolutely outrageous'". The Hill.
  13. ^ "Sidney Powell: Mueller Report Meets the Rule of Law". Civitas Institute. April 29, 2019. Archived from the original on November 14, 2020. Retrieved November 19, 2020.
  14. ^ "Commencement 1978 - University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill". University of North Carolina Library digital archive. Retrieved November 15, 2020.
  15. ^ a b c Morill, Jim (November 21, 2020). "Sidney Powell's road from UNC to defending Trump's supposed 'landslide' reelection". Charlotte Observer.
  16. ^ a b "Sidney Powell P.C." Archived from the original on November 16, 2020. Retrieved November 14, 2020.
  17. ^ Harris, Andrew; Farrell, Greg (June 12, 2019). "Michael Flynn's new lawyer is firebrand DOJ critic Sidney Powell". Providence Journal. Retrieved November 24, 2020.
  18. ^ a b c d e f g Davis, Aaron (November 28, 2020). "For Trump advocate Sidney Powell, a playbook steeped in conspiracy theories". The Washington Post. Retrieved November 30, 2020.
  19. ^ a b "Sidney Powell". National Review. Retrieved November 23, 2020.
  20. ^ a b "Sidney Powell". Observer. Archived from the original on November 14, 2020. Retrieved November 14, 2020.
  21. ^ Powell, Sidney (June 6, 2019). "Letter to William Barr re Internal review, Brady, IG Report, Declassification, and Lt. General Michael Flynn (retired)" (PDF). Sidney Powell, P.C. Archived (PDF) from the original on October 4, 2019. Retrieved November 15, 2020.
  22. ^ Mazzetti, Mark; Savage, Charlie; Goldman, Adam (June 28, 2020). "How Michael Flynn's Defense Team Found Powerful Allies". The New York Times. Archived from the original on November 15, 2020. Retrieved November 15, 2020.
  23. ^ Polantz, Katelyn. "Justice Department drops criminal case against Michael Flynn". CNN. Archived from the original on November 15, 2020. Retrieved November 15, 2020.
  24. ^ "Full D.C. Circuit Court Rejects Michael Flynn's Emergency Petition for Immediate Dismissal of Criminal Case". Lawandcrime.com. Archived from the original on November 18, 2020. Retrieved November 15, 2020.
  25. ^ "Appeals court seems wary of ordering dismissal of Flynn case". Star Tribune. Archived from the original on November 16, 2020. Retrieved November 15, 2020.
  26. ^ "'That's Not True and You Know It,' Federal Judge Tells DOJ Lawyer in Flynn Matter". Courthousenews.com. August 11, 2020. Archived from the original on November 17, 2020. Retrieved November 15, 2020.
  27. ^ "United States v. Michael T. Flynn, Crim. No. 17-232 (D.D.C. 2020) - Government's Response to Court-Appointed Amicus Curiae, the Honorable John Gleeson (Ret.)" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on November 20, 2020. Retrieved November 17, 2020.
  28. ^ Tucker, Eric (November 25, 2020). "Trump pardons Flynn despite guilty plea in Russia probe". AP. Retrieved November 26, 2020.
  29. ^ "Fact check: TV news clip does not show 'live computerized fraud' on Election Day 2020". Reuters. November 10, 2020. Archived from the original on November 16, 2020. Retrieved November 15, 2020.
  30. ^ Fichera, Angelo; Spencer, Saranac Hale (November 13, 2020). "Bogus Theory Claims Supercomputer Switched Votes in Election". FactCheck.org. Archived from the original on November 15, 2020. Retrieved November 15, 2020.
  31. ^ Fichera, Angelo; Spencer, Saranac Hale (November 13, 2020). "Bogus Theory Claims Supercomputer Switched Votes in Election". FactCheck.org. Retrieved November 22, 2020.
  32. ^ Leibovich, Mark (November 20, 2020). "Trump's Legal Team Sets a Precedent for Lowering the Bar". The New York Times.
  33. ^ a b Fichera, Angelo; Spencer, Saranac Hale (November 13, 2020). "Bogus Theory Claims Supercomputer Switched Votes in Election". FactCheck.org. Archived from the original on November 15, 2020. Retrieved November 15, 2020.
  34. ^ a b "Repudiating Trump, officials say election 'most secure'". AP NEWS. November 13, 2020. Archived from the original on November 15, 2020. Retrieved November 15, 2020.
  35. ^ Collins, Kaitlan; LeBlanc, Paul (November 18, 2020). "Trump fires director of Homeland Security agency who had rejected President's election conspiracy theories". CNN. Archived from the original on November 18, 2020. Retrieved November 18, 2020.
  36. ^ "Trump legal team to file new ballot lawsuits". Fox News. November 8, 2020. Archived from the original on November 15, 2020. Retrieved November 14, 2020.
  37. ^ Donald Trump [@realDonaldTrump] (November 14, 2020). "I look forward to Mayor Giuliani spearheading the legal effort to defend OUR RIGHT to FREE and FAIR ELECTIONS! Rudy Giuliani, Joseph diGenova, Victoria Toensing, Sidney Powell, and Jenna Ellis, a truly great team, added to our other wonderful lawyers and representatives!" (Tweet). Retrieved November 23, 2020 – via Twitter.
  38. ^ a b c Blake, Aaron (November 20, 2020). "The Trump campaign's much-hyped affidavit features a big, glaring error". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on November 20, 2020. Retrieved November 20, 2020.
  39. ^ a b c "Giuliani cites affidavit with crucial errors in press conference". PolitiFact. Retrieved November 23, 2020.
  40. ^ Williams, Jordan (November 20, 2020). "Trump lawyers cited Minnesota counties in affidavit about Michigan: report". The Hill. Retrieved November 23, 2020.
  41. ^ Sherman, Jake; Palmer, Anna; Ross, Garrett; Okun, Eli. "POLITICO Playbook PM: Rudy". POLITICO. Archived from the original on November 20, 2020. Retrieved November 19, 2020.
  42. ^ Subramaniam, Tara; Lybrand, Holmes. "Fact checking Giuliani and the Trump legal team's wild, fact-free press conference". CNN. Archived from the original on November 20, 2020. Retrieved November 20, 2020.
  43. ^ Darcy, Oliver. "Company debunks conspiracy theory that its server showed a landslide for Trump". CNN. Retrieved November 23, 2020.
  44. ^ Qiu, Linda (November 20, 2020). "Trump allies are among the frequent purveyors of election misinformation". The New York Times.
  45. ^ Joffe-Block, Jude (November 14, 2020). "False reports claim election servers were seized in Germany". AP News. Archived from the original on November 15, 2020. Retrieved November 22, 2020.
  46. ^ "Scytl strongly denies the false information related to the U.S. elections". Scytl. November 13, 2020. Archived from the original on November 20, 2020. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  47. ^ Roose, Kevin (November 18, 2020). "No, the Army didn't seize a German server showing a Trump landslide". The New York Times. Archived from the original on November 21, 2020. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  48. ^ Carlson, Tucker (November 19, 2020). "Tucker Carlson: Time for Sidney Powell to show us her evidence". Fox News. Retrieved November 23, 2020.
  49. ^ "Trump lawyer Sidney Powell says Georgia election lawsuit "will be biblical," suggests GOP governor helped Biden". Newsweek. November 22, 2020. Retrieved November 23, 2020.
  50. ^ "Trump campaign cuts ties with attorney Sidney Powell after bizarre election fraud claims". the Guardian. Associated Press. November 23, 2020. Retrieved November 23, 2020.
  51. ^ Haberman, Maggie; Feuer, Alan (November 22, 2020). "Trump Team Disavows Lawyer Who Peddled Conspiracy Theories on Voting". The New York Times. Archived from the original on November 23, 2020. Retrieved November 26, 2020.
  52. ^ "Sidney Powell Goes After Brian Kemp Over Election Conspiracy". Mediaite. November 22, 2020. Archived from the original on November 22, 2020. Retrieved November 22, 2020.
  53. ^ "Sidney Powell: Trump team cuts ties with lawyer who peddled bizarre fraud claims". BBC News. November 23, 2020. Retrieved November 24, 2020.
  54. ^ Vella, Lauren (November 19, 2020). "Ernst: Trump lawyer claim that candidates pay to rig elections 'absolutely outrageous'". The Hill. Archived from the original on November 20, 2020. Retrieved November 20, 2020.
  55. ^ Smith, David (November 21, 2020). "Trump makes futile last stand to overturn results as Georgia certifies Biden win". The Guardian. Archived from the original on November 21, 2020. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  56. ^ "Sidney Powell: "The entire election, frankly, in all the swing states should be overturned and the legislatures should make sure that the electors are selected for Trump"". Archived from the original on November 20, 2020. Retrieved November 20, 2020.
  57. ^ "Trump campaign legal team distances itself from Powell". AP NEWS. November 23, 2020. Retrieved November 23, 2020.
  58. ^ "Trump legal team disavows association with lawyer Sidney Powell". CBS News. Retrieved November 23, 2020.
  59. ^ "Trump campaign cuts Sidney Powell from president's legal team". POLITICO.
  60. ^ Sonmez, Felicia; Dawsey, Josh (November 22, 2020). "Giuliani releases statement distancing Trump campaign from lawyer Sidney Powell". The Washington Post. Retrieved November 22, 2020.
  61. ^ Wolfe, Jan (November 23, 2020). "Trump campaign parts ways with Powell after vote-switching claim". Reuters.
  62. ^ Buchanan, Christopher (November 27, 2020). "Dominion Voting Systems responds to 'wild and reckless' claims by Sidney Powell on website". WTIC-TV. Retrieved November 29, 2020.
  63. ^ O'Sullivan, Donie. "Sidney Powell is a beacon of hope to sad Qanon supporters". CNN.
  64. ^ Alba, Davey (November 17, 2020). "'Release the Kraken,' a catchphrase for unfounded conspiracy theory, trends on Twitter". The New York Times.
  65. ^ Beck, Molly (December 1, 2020). "GOP candidate says he was used without permission as a plaintiff in lawsuit to overturn Wisconsin election results". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Retrieved December 2, 2020.
  66. ^ Wickert, David (November 26, 2020). "Georgia Trump supporters fight on in court". Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Archived from the original on December 2, 2020. Retrieved December 2, 2020.
  67. ^ a b c d e f Montellaro, Zach; Cheney, Kyle (December 3, 2020). "Pro-Trump legal crusade peppered with bizarre blunders". Politico. Retrieved December 3, 2020.
  68. ^ Harwell, Drew (December 1, 2020). "To boost voter-fraud claims, Trump advocate Sidney Powell turns to unusual source: The longtime operator of QAnon's Internet home". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on December 2, 2020. Retrieved December 2, 2020.
  69. ^ Hohmann, James; Alfaro, Mariana (December 2, 2020). "The Daily 202: Trump's threat to veto NDAA follows pattern of tenuously invoking 'National Security'". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on December 2, 2020. Retrieved December 3, 2020.
  70. ^ Mikkelson, David (December 1, 2020). "Sidney Powell Lawsuit Cites Election Fraud in Non-Existent Michigan County". Snopes. Retrieved December 2, 2020.
  71. ^ Pierce, Charles P. (December 1, 2020). "Sidney Powell Is the Elite Legal Strike Force's Elite Legal Kraken Keeper Trump's legal eagle flies into Edison County, Michigan, which does not exist". Esquire. Retrieved December 2, 2020.
  72. ^ Halpert, Madeline; Oosting, Jonathan; Shaheen, Mansur (December 1, 2020). "Weeks after vote, 13 fake fraud claims persist in Michigan. Here's the truth". Bridge Michigan. Retrieved December 2, 2020.
  73. ^ Porter, Tom. "An attorney leading Trump's attempt to subvert the election results is a longtime QAnon supporter". Business Insider. Archived from the original on November 20, 2020. Retrieved November 20, 2020.
  74. ^ a b Gilbert, David (November 20, 2020). "Trump's Lawyer Sidney Powell Is Hardcore QAnon". Vice. Archived from the original on November 20, 2020. Retrieved November 20, 2020.
  75. ^ Roose, Kevin (August 28, 2020). "What Is QAnon, the Viral Pro-Trump Conspiracy Theory?". The New York Times. Archived from the original on September 22, 2020. Retrieved October 4, 2020.
  76. ^ Friedman, Dan (November 17, 2020). "Michael Flynn's Lawyer Wants to Raise "Millions of Dollars" to Overturn the Election". Mother Jones. Retrieved November 23, 2020.
  77. ^ Mustafa, Filiz. "WHO IS SIDNEY POWELL?". HITC. Archived from the original on November 17, 2020. Retrieved November 20, 2020.
  78. ^ "Review of Licensed to Lie". Kirkus Reviews. April 29, 2014. Archived from the original on May 26, 2020. Retrieved November 20, 2020.
  79. ^ Highfill, Samantha (May 2, 2014). "Meet the woman behind 'Decoding Annie Parker'". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on December 27, 2014. Retrieved November 15, 2020.
  80. ^ McNary, Dave (December 4, 2013). "Samantha Morton-Helen Hunt's 'Decoding Annie Parker' Gets U.S. Distribution". Variety. Archived from the original on August 17, 2020. Retrieved November 19, 2020.

External links