Siemens Competition

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The Siemens Competition is a science competition funded by the Siemens Foundation, which was administered by the College Board from 1999-2013 and by Discovery Education starting in 2014.[1]

Eligibility requirements[edit]

The Siemens Competition is open to high school students who are citizens or permanent residents of the US. Students must be in good standing and attend a

  • high school in a US state, Puerto Rico, Guam, US Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Wake and Midway Islands, or the Marianas, or
  • DoDEA school, or overseas American or international school, or
  • Foreign school as an exchange student or because your parent or guardian lives and works abroad, or
  • Homeschool/HBI.

Students submitting an individual project must be enrolled in and attending their last year of high school. Team projects may have two or three members and must be enrolled in and attending high school (9th through 12th grade).

History[edit]

Siemens AG purchased Westinghouse Electric Corporation's power generation unit in 1997, but sponsorship of the Westinghouse Science Talent Search (now the Regeneron Science Talent Search) was not part of the deal. When Siemens lost the bidding for the competition to Intel, Siemens decided to create the Siemens Foundation to continue the tradition using the well-known Westinghouse name, calling the new competition the Siemens Westinghouse Competition (SWC) and, later, the Siemens Competition. The first awards were given in 1999.[2]

The competition has the same goals as the old Westinghouse Competition, but there are several added dimensions, most notably awards for team projects and regional awards. The regional finals are held in cooperation with six partner universities: MIT, Georgia Tech, Caltech, University of Texas at Austin, the University of Notre Dame, and Carnegie Mellon.[3]

2007 was the first year that women won the top prizes in both the individual and team competitions at Siemens. The individual winner was Isha Jain of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, and the top team winners were Janelle Schlossberger and Amanda Marinoff of Plainview, New York.[4]

Selection process[edit]

Each year, research reports submitted before a late-September to early-October deadline are subjected to a blind reading. 300 outstanding research reports, from more than 1600 entries, are selected as semifinalists. All semifinalists receive a special recognition package, with their names announced in a full page USA Today advertisement.[5]

From the pool of semifinalists, 30 individuals and 30 teams (2-3 students) are selected as Regional Finalists and are invited to compete during the month of November at one of the six partner universities (Caltech, UT Austin, Notre Dame, Carnegie Mellon, MIT, and Ga. Tech). In addition to project content, judging is also based on the oral presentation, poster display, cited references, and the question and answer session. All regional finalists receive $1,000 scholarships and bronze medals. One individual and one team from each region advances to the National Finals. These Regional winners receive $3,000 (individual) or $6,000 (total for teams) scholarships, and silver medals.

The National Finalists (6 individual and 6 team projects) receive an all-expense paid trip during the first weekend of December to Washington, DC. Winners of the Nationals receive scholarships ranging from $10,000 to the coveted $100,000 grand prize for the top individual and top team.[6]

Winners[edit]

Below is a list of the winners for each year of the Siemens Competition.[7][8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15]

Individual Winners[edit]

  • 1999: Lisa Harris, Dalton School (New York, NY)
  • 2000: Mariangela Lisanti, Staples High School (Westport, CT)
  • 2001: Ryan Patterson, Central High School (Grand Junction, CO)
  • 2002: Steven J. Byrnes, Roxbury Latin School (Lexington, MA)
  • 2003: Yin Li, Stuyvesant High School (New York, NY)
  • 2004: Aaron Goldin, San Dieguito High School Academy (Encinitas, CA)
  • 2005: Michael Viscardi, Josan Academy (San Diego, CA)
  • 2006: Dmitry Vaintrob, South Eugene High School (Eugene, OR)
  • 2007: Isha Jain, Freedom High School (Bethlehem, PA)
  • 2008: Wen Chyan, Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science (Denton, TX)
  • 2009: Ruoyi Jiang, Ward Melville High School (East Setauket, NY)
  • 2010: Benjamin Clark, Penn Manor High School (Millersville, PA)
  • 2011: Angela Zhang, Monta Vista High School (Monta Vista, CA)
  • 2012: Kensen Shi, A&M Consolidated High School (College Station, TX)
  • 2013: Eric Chen, Canyon Crest Academy (San Diego, CA)
  • 2014: Peter Tian, The Wellington School (Columbus, OH)
  • 2015: Maria Elena Grimmett, Oxbridge Academy of the Palm Beaches (West Palm Beach, FL)
  • 2016: Vineet Edupuganti, Oregon Episcopal School (Portland, OR)
  • 2017: Andrew Komo, Montgomery Blair High School (Silver Spring, MD)

Team Winners[edit]

  • 1999: Daniar Hussain and Steven Malliaris, New Trier High School (Winnetka, Illinois)
  • 2000: Charles Olbert, Christopher Clearfield and Nikolas Williams, The North Carolina School of Science and Math (Durham, NC)
  • 2001: Shira Billet and Dora Sosnowik, Stella K. Abraham High School for Girls (Hewlett Bay Park, NY)
  • 2002: Juliet R. Girard and Roshan D. Prabhu, William L. Dickinson High School (Jersey City, NJ)
  • 2003: Mark Schneider and Jeffrey Schneider, South Windsor High School (South Windsor, CT)
  • 2004: Lucie Guo and Xianlin Li, The North Carolina School of Science and Math (Durham, NC)
  • 2005: Anne Lee, Phoenix Country Day School (Paradise Valley, AZ) and Albert Shieh, Chaparral High School (Scottsdale, AZ)
  • 2006: Scott Molony, Steven Arcangeli, and Scott Horton, Oak Ridge High School (Oak Ridge, TN)
  • 2007: Janelle Schlossberger and Amanda Marinoff, John F. Kennedy High School (Plainview, NY)
  • 2008: Sajith Wickramasekara and Andrew Guo, North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics (Durham, NC)
  • 2009: Sean Karson, Trinity Preparatory High School (Winter Park, FL), Dan Liu, Liberal Arts and Science Academy High School (Austin, TX), and Kevin Chen, William P. Clements High School (Sugar Land, TX)
  • 2010: Akash Krishnan and Matthew Fernandez, Episcopal School (Portland, OR)
  • 2011: Ziyuan Liu, and Cassee Cain, Oak Ridge High School (Oak Ridge, TN)
  • 2012: Jeremy Applebaum, William Gil, and Allen Shin, George W. Hewlett High School (Hewlett, NY)
  • 2013: Priyanka Wadgaonkar, Zainab Mahmood and JiaWen Pei, George W. Hewlett High School (Hewlett, NY)
  • 2014: Eli Echt-Wilson and Albert Zuo, La Cueva High School (Albuquerque, NM)
  • 2015: Kimberly Te and Christine Yoo, Manhasset High School (Manhasset, NY)
  • 2016: Adhya Beesam and Shriya Beesam, Plano East Senior High School (Plano, TX)
  • 2017: Jillian Parker, Half Hollow Hills High School West, Jiachen Lee and Arooba Ahmed, Half Hollow Hills High School East (Dix Hills, NY)

High schools with the most finalists[edit]

Several schools have been consistently successful in producing Regional and National Finalists. By far the most finalists have come from North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics, and many finalists have also come from the Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science, Troy High School, Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology, and Oak Ridge High School. The schools listed below have produced double-digit regional finalists.[7][9][16][17][18][19][20][21][22][23][24][25][12][26][13][27][14][28][15]

Schools with the Most Regional and National Finalists (1999–2017)
School City State Regional National
North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics Durham NC 65 15
Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science Denton TX 48 6
Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology Alexandria VA 40 6
Troy High School (California) Fullerton CA 37 5
Oak Ridge High School Oak Ridge TN 35 12
Troy High School (Michigan) Troy MI 30 7
The Harker School San Jose CA 21 7
Carmel High School Carmel IN 21 3
Lexington High School Lexington MA 19 8
Jericho High School Jericho NY 18 5
Ward Melville High School East Setauket NY 18 4
Hathaway Brown School Shaker Heights OH 17 4
Stuyvesant High School New York NY 17 3
Montgomery Blair High School Silver Spring MD 15 4
Monta Vista High School Cupertino CA 14 3
Illinois Math and Science Academy Aurora IL 13 2
Midwood High School Brooklyn NY 13 0
William G. Enloe High School Raleigh NC 11 3

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Siemens Competition". Discovery Education. Retrieved 10 December 2014. 
  2. ^ "Science Fairs Pump Up the Rewards of Talent". Science. 6 December 1999. 
  3. ^ "Siemens Foundation: Competition Process". Retrieved 2007-11-21. 
  4. ^ http://www.voanews.com/learningenglish/home/a-23-2007-12-13-voa1-83133097.html
  5. ^ "Competition Process". Siemens Foundation. Retrieved 6 February 2014. 
  6. ^ "Siemens Competition Scholarships". Siemens Foundation. Retrieved 6 February 2014. 
  7. ^ a b "Siemens Competition Archives" (PDF). Internet Wayback Machine: Siemens Foundation. 1999–2004. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 23, 2005. 
  8. ^ "Genetics and Mathematics Research Win Top Honors in Siemens Westinghouse Competition". Internet Wayback Machine: Siemens Foundation. Archived from the original on December 8, 2005. 
  9. ^ a b "Siemens Competition". Internet Wayback Machine: Siemens Foundation. 2006–2013. Archived from the original on 27 November 2014. 
  10. ^ "Bone Growth and Tuberculosis Research Take Top Honors in Nation's Premier High School Science Competition" (PDF). Internet Wayback Machine: Siemens Foundation. Archived from the original (PDF) on December 26, 2007. 
  11. ^ "Teen Superstars Explore Chemotherapeutics and a 30-Year-Old Math Problem; Take Home Top Prize in 2009 Siemens Competition in Math, Science & Technology" (PDF). Internet Wayback Machine: Siemens Foundation. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 2, 2010. 
  12. ^ a b "Ohio and New Mexico Students Capture $100,000 Scholarship Prize in 2014 Siemens Competition in Math, Science & Technology". Siemens Foundation. 9 December 2014. 
  13. ^ a b "Florida and New York Students Capture $100,000 Scholarship Prizes in 2015 Siemens Competition in Math, Science & Technology". Siemens Foundation. 8 December 2015. 
  14. ^ a b "Oregon and Texas Students Win $100,000 Scholarship Prizes in 2016 Siemens Competition in Math, Science, & Technology". Siemens Foundation. 6 December 2016. 
  15. ^ a b "Maryland and New York Students Capture $100,000 Scholarship Prizes in 2017 SIEMENS Competition in Math, Science and Technology". Siemens Foundation. 5 December 2017. 
  16. ^ "2005-06 Siemens Westinghouse Competition - Regional Finalists". Internet Wayback Machine: Siemens Foundation. Archived from the original on November 23, 2005. 
  17. ^ "2006-07 Siemens Competition Regional Finalists" (PDF). Internet Wayback Machine: Siemens Foundation. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 5, 2006. 
  18. ^ "2007-08 Siemens Competition Regional Finalists" (PDF). Internet Wayback Machine: Siemens Foundation. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 9, 2007. 
  19. ^ "2008-09 Siemens Competition Regional Finalists" (PDF). Internet Wayback Machine: Siemens Foundation. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 5, 2008. 
  20. ^ "2009-10 Siemens Competition Regional Finalists" (PDF). Internet Wayback Machine: Siemens Foundation. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 2, 2010. 
  21. ^ "2010 Siemens Competition Regional Finalists" (PDF). Internet Wayback Machine: Siemens Foundation. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 13, 2011. 
  22. ^ "2011 Siemens Competition Regional Finalists" (PDF). Internet Wayback Machine: Siemens Foundation. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 24, 2011. 
  23. ^ "2012 Siemens Competition Regional Finalists". Internet Wayback Machine: Siemens Foundation. Archived from the original on October 24, 2012. 
  24. ^ "2013 Siemens Competition Regional Finalists" (PDF). Internet Wayback Machine: Siemens Foundation. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 13, 2013. 
  25. ^ "2014 Siemens Competition Regional Finalists". Internet Wayback Machine: Siemens Foundation. Archived from the original on March 13, 2015. 
  26. ^ "Regional Finalists Announced for 2015 Siemens Competition in Math, Science and Technology". Siemens Foundation. 19 October 2015. 
  27. ^ "Here are the Regional Finalists for the 2016 Siemens Competition in Math, Science and Technology!". Siemens Foundation. 19 October 2016. 
  28. ^ "101 U.S. Regional Finalists Announced for 2017 Siemens Competiton in Math, Science and Technology All Vying for Chance to Win $100,000 Scholarship". Siemens Foundation. 18 October 2017. 

External links[edit]