Signe Toksvig

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Signe Toksvig with Frank O'Connor, 1936

Signe Toksvig (1891–1983) was a Danish writer. Her articles were published in the New York Times, the Nation, The Atlantic, and other periodicals. She also published several books, including biographies of Hans Christian Andersen and Emanuel Swedenborg. Her life and work, and obstacles she encountered, has also been the focus of scholarship by others.[1] All her writings were in English.[1]:448

At age 14, Toksvig emigrated with her family from Denmark to the United States.[1]:448 She graduated from Cornell in 1916, and then worked as an assistant editor at The New Republic. In 1918, she married the journal's founder, Francis Hackett, an Irish writer and literary critic.[2] They moved to Ireland in 1926 and lived there until 1937, when they moved to Denmark. They spent the Second World War in the United States, but returned to Europe and Denmark in the 1950s.[1]:448

Toksvig's short story "The Devil's Martyr" was cover-featured on the June 1928 Weird Tales

Bibliography[edit]

Novels[edit]

  • Toksvig, Signe (1927). The last devil. New York: John Day. 
  • Toksvig, Signe (1937). Eve's doctor. New York: Harcourt. 
  • Toksvig, Signe (1938). Port of refuge. London: Faber and Faber. 
  • Toksvig, Signe (1941). Life boat. London: Faber and Faber. 

Biographies[edit]

  • Toksvig, Signe (1933). The life of Hans Christian Andersen. London: Macmillan. 
  • Toksvig, Signe (1972). Emanuel Swedenborg: Scientist and mystic. Freeport, NY: Books for Libraries Press. ISBN 0-8369-8140-5.  (first published 1948)

Articles[edit]

  • Signe Toksvig (September 30, 1945). "Aldous Huxley's prescriptions for spiritual myopia". New York Times. p. 117. 

As editor[edit]

Critical studies, reviews and biography of Toksvig[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Lis Pihl (1999). "'A muzzle made in Ireland': Irish censorship and Signe Toksvig". Studies: An Irish Quarterly Review. Irish Province of the Society of Jesus. 88 (352): 448–457. JSTOR 30093536. 
  2. ^ "The Lilliput Press". lilliputpress.ie. Retrieved 1 September 2015. 
  3. ^ Includes several letters to Toksvig.

External links[edit]