Signum Biosciences

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Signum Biosciences, Inc. is a dietary supplement company in Monmouth Junction, NJ.[1] Signum agreed in 2019 to stop making certain claims about its EHT supplement, and to stop allowing its multi-level marketing partner firm Neora (formerly Nerium International) to make such claims.

History[edit]

Signum was founded in 2003. Gregory Stock served as the first CEO.[2]

Neora (Nerium) partnership and FTC injunction[edit]

In 2015 Signum partnered with Neora, LLC (then known as Nerium International) to launch a dietary supplement called eicosanoyl-5-hydroxytryptamide (EHT).[3] EHT is derived from coffee and inhibits demethylation of the enzyme protein phosphatase 2 (PPP2CA; PP2A).[4] In October 2019 the Federal Trade Commission won a permanent injunction against Signum BioSciences, Signum Nutralogix, and affiliated companies including Neora. The injunction prohibits claims or representations of EHT's efficacy in treating or mitigating Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, or brain injury including CTE and concussion, unless those claims are backed up by randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled human clinical testing.[5][6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Signum profile at Bloomerberg". bloomberg.com. Retrieved April 10, 2015.
  2. ^ Gregory Stock. "Where are the New Therapeutics?". gregorystock.net. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved April 10, 2015.
  3. ^ "Nerium Press Release: Nerium International Introduces New, Advanced Anti-Aging Product Focused on Optimal Brain Health". April 10, 2015. Archived from the original on May 11, 2019. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  4. ^ Haas, M. J. (May 26, 2011). "Extracting PD therapy from coffee". SciBX. 2011 (590): 590. doi:10.1038/scibx.2011.590. Archived from the original on March 27, 2020. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  5. ^ DiFurio, Dom (November 1, 2019). "FTC sues Addison-based Neora for allegedly operating pyramid scheme, pushing concussion treatment". dallasnews.com. Archived from the original on March 27, 2020. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  6. ^ Notopoulos, Katie (November 6, 2019). "The FTC Said This Skincare Line Is A Pyramid Scheme". buzzfeednews.com. Archived from the original on March 27, 2020. Retrieved March 27, 2020.