Silent Lucidity

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
"Silent Lucidity"
Queensryche - Silent Lucidity cover.jpg
Single by Queensrÿche
from the album Empire
ReleasedFebruary 1991
RecordedSpring 1990
Genre
Length5:47
LabelEMI America
Songwriter(s)Chris DeGarmo
Producer(s)Peter Collins
Queensrÿche singles chronology
"Best I Can"
(1990)
"Silent Lucidity"
(1991)
"Jet City Woman"
(1991)

"Silent Lucidity" is a power ballad[4][6] by the American rock band Queensrÿche from the 1990 album Empire. The song, which was composed by lead guitarist Chris DeGarmo, was the biggest hit for the band, peaking at #9 on the Billboard Hot 100[7] and at #1 on the Billboard Album Rock Tracks chart.[8] "Silent Lucidity" was also nominated in 1992 for the Grammy Awards for Best Rock Song and Best Rock Vocal Performance by a Duo or Group.[9]

Track listing[edit]

Original 1991 release[edit]

  1. "Silent Lucidity" – 5:49
  2. "The Mission" [Live] – 6:17
  3. "Eyes of a Stranger [Live] – 8:03

Chart performance[edit]

Weekly charts[edit]

Chart (1991–92) Peak
US Mainstream Rock[10] 1
US Billboard Hot 100[7] 9
US Radio Songs[11] 34
Canada RPM 7[12]
UK Singles 34[13]
UK Singles (reissue) 18[13]

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (1991) Position
Canada Top Singles (RPM) 69[14]
US Top Pop Singles (Billboard) 82[15]

Personnel[edit]

Additional personnel[edit]

Accolades[edit]

Publication Country Accolade Rank
Classic Rock US The 40 Greatest Power Ballads[4] 36
Glide Magazine US Favorite Hair Metal Power Ballads[5] 6
VH1 US Greatest Power Ballads[6] 21

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Boehm, Mike (June 27, 1997). "Metal and Its Byproducts : Queensryche Upgrades the Machinery Without Undergoing a Retrofit or Total Conversion". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved February 24, 2021.
  2. ^ Criblez, David J. (November 11, 2016). "Three lead singers take LI solo flights". Newsday. Retrieved June 28, 2021.
  3. ^ Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "Queensrÿche | Biography & History". AllMusic. Retrieved February 2, 2021.
  4. ^ a b c "The 40 Greatest Power Ballads". Classic Rock. February 14, 2015.
  5. ^ a b Bernstein, Scott (January 4, 2007). "THE B List: Favorite Hair-Metal Power Ballads". Glide Magazine. Retrieved February 24, 2021.
  6. ^ a b "Greatest Power Ballads". VH1.com. MTV Networks. Archived from the original on November 13, 2006. Retrieved August 7, 2020.
  7. ^ a b "Billboard Hot 100". Billboard. Retrieved 2021-06-25.
  8. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2004). The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits (8th ed.). Billboard Publications. p. 514.
  9. ^ "34th Grammy Awards — 1992". Rock on the Net.com. Retrieved May 7, 2012.
  10. ^ "Mainstream rock". Billboard. Retrieved 2021-06-25.
  11. ^ "Radio Songs". Billboard. Retrieved 2021-06-25.
  12. ^ "RPM Top 100 Singles - June 8, 1991" (PDF). collectionscanada.gc.ca.
  13. ^ a b "Queensrÿche". officialcharts.com. Retrieved August 7, 2020.
  14. ^ "RPM 100 Hit Tracks of 1991". RPM. Retrieved November 23, 2017.
  15. ^ "1991 The Year in Music & Video: Top Pop Singles". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media. 103 (51): YE-14. December 21, 1991.

External links[edit]