Silver iodate

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Silver iodate
Silver iodate
Identifiers
3D model (Jmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.029.126
EC Number 232-039-6
Properties
AgIO3
Molar mass 282.77 g/mol
Appearance white crystals
Odor odorless
Density 5.525 g/cm³
Melting point ~200 °C
Boiling point ~1150 °C
0.003 g/100 mL (10 °C)
0.019 g/100 mL (50 °C)
Solubility soluble in ammonia
Structure
orthorhombic
Hazards
NFPA 704
Flammability code 1: Must be pre-heated before ignition can occur. Flash point over 93 °C (200 °F). E.g., canola oil Health code 2: Intense or continued but not chronic exposure could cause temporary incapacitation or possible residual injury. E.g., chloroform Reactivity code 0: Normally stable, even under fire exposure conditions, and is not reactive with water. E.g., liquid nitrogen Special hazards (white): no codeNFPA 704 four-colored diamond
Flash point Non-combustable
Related compounds
Other anions
silver iodide
silver chlorate
Other cations
sodium iodate
potassium iodate
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Silver iodate (AgIO3) is a light-sensitive, white crystal composed of silver, iodine and oxygen. Unlike most metal iodates, it is practically insoluble in water.

Production[edit]

Silver iodate can be obtained by reacting silver nitrate (AgNO3) with sodium iodate or potassium iodate. The by-product of the reaction is sodium nitrate.[1]

Alternatively, it can be created by the action of iodine in a solution of silver oxide.

Uses[edit]

Silver iodate is used to detect traces of chlorides in blood.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Qiu, Chao; Sheng Han; Xingguo Cheng; Tianhui Ren (2005). "Distribution of Thioethers in Hydrotreated Transformer Base Oil by Oxidation and ICP-AES Analysis". Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research. 44 (11): 4151–4155. doi:10.1021/ie048833b. Retrieved 2007-05-03. Silver nitrate reacts with iodate to form the precipitate of silver iodate, and the precipitate is transferred to silver nitrate.