Simon Brooks

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Dr Simon Brooks (born 1971[1]) is a Welsh academic and writer. He is a former editor of the Welsh language current affairs magazine Barn (1996–2007), as well as founding co-editor of the Welsh language cultural magazine Tu Chwith between 1993 and 1996. A collection of his journalism in Barn was published in 2009. He is also a founding member of the Welsh language pressure group Cymuned, for whom he was a prominent media spokesman between 2001 and 2004, and whose central office he ran. He was a lecturer at the School of Welsh, Cardiff University.[2]

Brooks belongs to a family that supports the Labour Party but is himself a Welsh Nationalist.[3] He left Plaid Cymru in the first decade of the 21st century, after being openly critical of Dafydd Elis-Thomas[4] and rejoined ten years later when his friend Leanne Wood became party leader.[5]

His book Pam Na Fu Cymru (2015) was shortlisted for Wales Book of the Year award in the non-fiction category.[6] The English edition was published in 2017.[7]

Bibliography[edit]

Academic

  • O Dan Lygaid y Gestapo: Yr Oleuedigaeth Gymraeg a Theori Lenyddol yng Nghymru (Beneath the eyes of the Gestapo: The Welsh Enlightenment and Literature Theory in Wales) - University of Wales Press 2004
  • Pam Na Fu Cymru: Methiant Cenedlaetholdeb Cymraeg (Why Wales Never Was: The Failure of Welsh Nationalism) - University of Wales Press 2015

Journalism

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://socialarchive.iath.virginia.edu/ark:/99166/w6zx7ngm
  2. ^ "Cardiff University". www.cf.ac.uk. Retrieved 2015-07-30. 
  3. ^ Huw Williams (17 July 2015). "Pam Na Fu Cymru – Why Wales Never Was". IWA. Retrieved 28 May 2017. 
  4. ^ [Language campaigner who criticised Plaid Cymru rejoins the party "Attack on '19th century' nationalism"] Check |url= value (help). BBC News. 18 December 2001. Retrieved 27 May 2017. 
  5. ^ Martin Shipton (25 August 2015). "Language campaigner who criticised Plaid Cymru rejoins the party". WalesOnline. Retrieved 27 May 2017. 
  6. ^ http://www.bbc.com/cymrufyw/36333360
  7. ^ http://www.uwp.co.uk/book/why-wales-never-was-ebook-pdf/