Simon Cross (rugby union)

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Simon Cross
SimonCross(RugbyPlayer).jpg
Full name Simon Terriss Cross
Date of birth (1981-02-03) 3 February 1981 (age 36)
Place of birth Mauritius
Height 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Weight 16 st 11 lb (107 kg)
Occupation(s) Professional rugby union coach
Rugby union career
Position(s) Flanker
Amateur team(s)
Years Team Apps (Points)
2008 Selkirk ()
Correct as of 22 June 2008
Senior career
Years Team Apps (Points)
2000–2003
2003–2010
2006
Wasps
Edinburgh
Waterloo

97
()
Correct as of 4 May 2010
Current local club Edinburgh Rugby
National team(s)
Years Team Comps
2007 Scotland Hong Kong; Adelaide; London; Edinburgh
Teams coached
Years Team
2003–2008
2008–2011
2011-2013
2012-2013
2013 -
Penicuik
Murrayfield Wanderers
Edinburgh Accies
Scotland U20s
Worcester Warriors
Correct as of 24 June 2008

Simon Terriss Cross (born 3 February 1981 in Mauritius) was a Scottish rugby union player and now defence coach at Worcester Warriors. He played in the back row as a flanker for Edinburgh Rugby, who compete in the Magners League and Heineken Cup. Cross was educated at Sedbergh School at Winder House where he was Head Boy and Captain of Rugby.

Club career[edit]

Cross joined Edinburgh Rugby in 2003 after starting his professional career with London Wasps where he captained the Under-21 side for three years the culmination of which was beating Bristol in the U21 Final at Twickenham in 2003.

During the 2006–07 season, Cross was loaned by Edinburgh to English National Division One club Waterloo for a period of one month.[1]

Cross was appointed Club Captain at the start of the 2007–08 season alongside Allister Hogg as First Team Captain.[2] Cross will retained the club captaincy for the 2008–09 season, with Mike Blair as First Team Captain.[3]

In April 2008, Cross signed a new two-year contract with Edinburgh.[4]

As part of the draft of all players from the Scottish pro-teams (Edinburgh and Glasgow Warriors) to the Scottish Premier One rugby clubs, Cross was selected by Selkirk and was available to play for them during the 2008–09 season when not required by Edinburgh or any of the national teams.[5]

Cross retired from professional rugby at the end of the 2009/2010 season due to persistent knee problems.[6]

International career[edit]

Cross represented Scotland Under-19 in the 2000 IRB/FIRA Junior World Cup.[1]

In 2002, Cross turned down the opportunity to play with the England Under-21 team and in 2003 joined the Scottish national training squad pending a ruling from the IRB on his qualification to play for Scotland.

Cross, who has always considered himself to be Scottish, was born in Mauritius whilst his father served there in the British Army. His mother, Fiona, was born Germany while her father also served in the British Army, his father, Peter, is English. Cross's maternal grandfather and great-grandfather were born in military hospitals, both in India. His great-great-grandfather was born in Scotland.

On 21 January 2004, the IRB Regulations Committee ruled that he was free to play for Scotland having demonstrated a "close, credible and established national link with the country" and accepted that "certain rights flow from birth in a British military hospital".

The Committee's statement went on to say that "if the player, his mother and/or grandfather had not been on military service and therefore born in British military hospitals, the strong likelihood is that given the historical circumstances and family lineage at least one of them would have been born in Scotland."

"The committee also took the view that close links to Scotland were further demonstrated by the fact that the player, who was eligible to play for other unions, refrained from representing such other unions."

"In particular he turned down opportunities to play with the England national representative under 21s team in 2002."[1][7][8]

Despite having been selected for national training squads by both the current Scotland coach, Frank Hadden,[9] and his predecessor, Matt Williams,[8] and even being named among the replacements,[10] Cross never received a full international cap.[11]

In 2007, Cross represented Scotland during the final four rounds of the 2006-07 IRB Sevens World Series in Hong Kong, Adelaide, London and the inaugural Edinburgh Sevens at Murrayfield.[1]

Coaching[edit]

In addition to his playing duties for Edinburgh, Cross was the first team coach for Murrayfield Wanderers for the 2008–09 season. He was then appointed first team coach of Edinburgh Accies for 3 seasons 2010 - 2012 where he appointed his Edinburgh team mate, Andrew Easson as backs coach.

Cross previously coached Penicuik for five years.[12]

Cross worked as Worcester Warriors as defence coach from 2013

In May 2017 he was appointed Head coach at Birmingham Moseley whilst maintaining a role as specialist break-down coach at Worcester

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Edinburgh Rugby. Simon Cross – Flanker Edinburgh Rugby. Retrieved on 22 August 2008.
  2. ^ BBC Sport (25 June 2007). Edinburgh Pair to Share Captaincy BBC Sport. Retrieved on 22 August 2008.
  3. ^ The Scotsman (11 July 2008). Captaincy Lets Blair Lead Club And Country The Scotsman. Retrieved 22 August 2008.
  4. ^ Black, Gareth (8 April 2008). Cross Glad To Call Edinburgh Home By Extending His Stay The Scotsman. Retrieved 22 August 2008.
  5. ^ Scottish Rugby Union (22 June 2008). Links Between P1 Clubs And Pro-Teams To Be Strengthened Scottish Rugby Union. Retrieved on 22 August 2008.
  6. ^ http://www.planetrugby.com/story/0,25883,3825_6122796,00.html
  7. ^ Ananova (January 2004). Cross Cleared To Play For Scotland Ananova. Retrieved on 22 August 2008.
  8. ^ a b Trace, Marion (22 January 2004) Great, Great Grandad Clears Cross The Scotsman. Retrieved on 22 August 2008.
  9. ^ Stuart, Lewis (5 May 2005) Hadden Stays Loyal To Scotland Players The Times. Retrieved on 22 August 2008.
  10. ^ BBC Sport (14 February 2004) Clockwatch: Wales 23–10 Scotland BBC Sport. Retrieved on 28 August 2008
  11. ^ Scrum.com Simon Cross Scrum.com. Retrieved on 22 August 2008.
  12. ^ The Scrum (July 2008). Young Coaches Making Mark In Capital Scottish Club Rugby Union Magazine. Retrieved on 22 August 2008.

External links[edit]