Simon Van Booy

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Simon Van Booy
Born 1975 (1975) (age 43)
Education Dartington College of Arts; Southampton College
Occupation Author
Website www.simonvanbooy.com

Simon Van Booy is an Anglo-American writer, currently living in the United States. His short story collection, Love Begins in Winter, won the 2009 Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award.

Fiction[edit]

Simon Van Booy has written three collections of short stories. His first collection, The Secret Lives of People in Love, was shortlisted for the 2011 Vilcek Prize for Creative Promise,[1] while his second collection, Love Begins in Winter, won the Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award.[2][3] His third collection, Tales of Accidental Genius, was released in 2015.[4]

Van Booy's first novel, Everything Beautiful Began After, was released in 2011, and was nominated for the 2012 Indies Choice Book Award for Fiction,[5] while his second novel, The Illusion of Separateness, was released in 2013. He released a third novel titled Father's Day in 2016.[6]

In 2010, Van Booy released his first children's book, Pobble's Way,[7] to be followed by Gertie Milk and the Keeper of Lost Things in 2017.[8]

Other works[edit]

Simon Van Booy, New York, 2011

Van Booy is the editor of three volumes of philosophy, entitled Why We Fight, Why We Need Love, and Why Our Decisions Don't Matter.[9]

Van Booy's essays have been published in newspapers internationally, including The New York Times,[10] The New York Post, The Daily Telegraph,[11] The Guardian,[12] The Mail,[13] and The Times.[14] They have also been broadcast on National Public Radio.[15]

In 2011, Van Booy delivered his first full-length stage comedy, and wrote an award-winning short film for the Morgans Hotel Group called Love Is Like Life But Longer.[16]

Teaching and lecturing[edit]

Van Booy lectures frequently at schools, universities, and libraries in the United States, the United Kingdom, and in China. He teaches part-time at the School of Visual Arts in New York City,[17] and at Long Island University, C.W. Post Campus.[18] He is an advocate of education as a means of social reform, and involved in the Rutgers University Early College Humanities program (REaCH) for young adults living in under-served communities.[19]

Design[edit]

Since 2009, Partners & Spade have carried Van Booy's "custom vintage Antarctic explorers' skis,"[20] and cold-weather hats, which he designed to support research in Antarctic regions and raise awareness for the Scott Polar Research Institute at University of Cambridge.

In translation[edit]

Van Booy's fiction and essays have been translated into over a eighteen languages throughout the world. In 2011 he embarked on a multiple city reading tour of China, where his books are available in two different varieties of Chinese.[21]

Criticism[edit]

His short story collections received positive reviews from New York Times[22] and the Los Angeles Times[23] Publishers Weekly gave The Illusion of Separateness a starred review, and said "the writing is what makes this remarkable book soar".[24]

Personal Life[edit]

Van Booy grew up in Ruthin and Oxford,[2][25] and currently resides in New York.[26] He has one daughter, and married Christina Daigneault in 2013.[27][28]

List of works[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 28 February 2011. Retrieved 18 April 2011. 
  2. ^ a b Grice, Bonnie (21 June 2010). "Save as Many as you Ruin". Save as Many as you Ruin. Prospect Magazine. Archived from the original on 4 July 2011. Retrieved 16 April 2011. 
  3. ^ Flood, Alison (21 September 2009). "Simon Van Booy wins world's richest short story prize". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 31 July 2017. Retrieved 30 July 2017. 
  4. ^ "Tales of Accidental Genius by Simon Van Booy Review". pastemagazine.com. Archived from the original on 31 July 2017. Retrieved 30 July 2017. 
  5. ^ "Winners of the 2012 Indies Choice and E.B. White Read-Aloud Awards Announced | American Booksellers Association". bookweb.org. Archived from the original on 16 February 2014. Retrieved 1 June 2014. 
  6. ^ "Fiction Book Review: Father's Day by Simon Van Booy". PublishersWeekly.com. Archived from the original on 31 July 2017. Retrieved 30 July 2017. 
  7. ^ "Children's Book Reviews - Pobble's Way by Simon Van Booy". The Reading Tub Childrens Book Reviews. Archived from the original on 22 April 2016. Retrieved 30 July 2017. 
  8. ^ "Random House for High School Teachers | Catalog - Gertie Milk and the Keeper of Lost Things by Simon Van Booy". www.randomhouse.com. Archived from the original on 31 July 2017. Retrieved 30 July 2017. 
  9. ^ "Five things: Practical philosophy". The Economist. 12 August 2010. Archived from the original on 31 July 2017. 
  10. ^ Van Booy, Simon (28 June 2009). "Raising a Princess Single-Handedly". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 19 June 2016. 
  11. ^ Van Booy, Simon (17 August 2009). "Childhood: a fleeting beauty not to be missed". The Daily Telegraph. London. Archived from the original on 9 October 2010. 
  12. ^ Van Booy, Simon (19 December 2009). "Simon Van Booy: Love and loss at Christmas". The Guardian. London. Archived from the original on 13 March 2014. Retrieved 17 April 2011. 
  13. ^ Van Booy, Simon (23 June 2010). "Meet father who's educating year old daughter finer points style". Daily Mail. London. Archived from the original on 28 July 2012. 
  14. ^ "The Times | UK News, World News and Opinion". thetimes.co.uk. Archived from the original on 27 January 2016. Retrieved 1 June 2014. 
  15. ^ "Tasting The Flavors of Life As Only 'George' Could : NPR". npr.org. Archived from the original on 14 August 2014. Retrieved 1 June 2014. 
  16. ^ Miller, Ken. "Poppy de Villeneuve's Elevator Love Letter". The Elevator Love Letter. Interview Magazine. Archived from the original on 13 March 2011. Retrieved 16 April 2011. 
  17. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 30 September 2011. Retrieved 18 April 2011. 
  18. ^ "Department of English". Archived from the original on 28 August 2001. Retrieved 1 June 2014. 
  19. ^ "Newark high school students are first graduates of Rutgers early college program". nj.com. Archived from the original on 14 August 2014. Retrieved 1 June 2014. 
  20. ^ "Partners & Spade Custom Vintage Skis". acquiremag.com. Archived from the original on 14 August 2014. Retrieved 1 June 2014. 
  21. ^ Yueran, Zhang. "Literature Events for March". Stories about love: Simon Van Booy in conversation with Zhang Yueran. British Council. Archived from the original on 10 October 2012. Retrieved 18 April 2011. 
  22. ^ Schillinger, Liesl (17 December 2010). "Turning the Pages on 2010: Books of Style". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 14 August 2014. 
  23. ^ "Discoveries". Los Angeles Times. 20 May 2007. Archived from the original on 22 October 2009. 
  24. ^ "Fiction Book Review: The Illusion of Separateness by Simon Van Booy". PublishersWeekly.com. Archived from the original on 31 July 2017. Retrieved 30 July 2017. 
  25. ^ "Interview with Simon Van Booy, winner of world's richest short story prize". walesonline. 12 December 2009. Archived from the original on 31 July 2017. Retrieved 30 July 2017. 
  26. ^ Van Booy, Simon. "Simon van Booy on "The Song Is You" with Bonnie Grice". The Song Is You with Bonnie Grice. prx.org. Archived from the original on 9 November 2011. Retrieved 16 April 2011. 
  27. ^ Laskey, Margaux (5 July 2013). "A Life Graced With Love Letters and Notes". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 31 July 2017. Retrieved 30 July 2017. 
  28. ^ "Claire Keegan & Simon Van Booy in conversation". Irish Writers Centre - Dublin, Ireland. Archived from the original on 31 July 2017. Retrieved 30 July 2017. 

29. [1]

External links[edit]