Simone Inzaghi

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Simone Inzaghi
S. Inzaghi.jpg
Inzaghi with Lazio in 2018
Personal information
Full name Simone Inzaghi
Date of birth (1976-04-05) 5 April 1976 (age 44)
Place of birth Piacenza, Italy
Height 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in)
Playing position(s) Striker
Club information
Current team
Lazio (manager)
Youth career
1992–1994 Piacenza
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1994–1999 Piacenza 30 (15)
1994–1995Carpi (loan) 9 (0)
1995–1996Novara (loan) 23 (4)
1996–1997Lumezzane (loan) 23 (6)
1997–1998 → Brescello (loan) 21 (10)
1999–2010 Lazio 133 (28)
2005Sampdoria (loan) 5 (0)
2007–2008Atalanta (loan) 19 (0)
Total 263 (63)
National team
1993–1994 Italy U18 4 (1)
2000–2003 Italy 3 (0)
Teams managed
2010–2016 Lazio (youth)
2016– Lazio
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Simone Inzaghi (Italian pronunciation: [siˈmoːne inˈtsaːɡi]; born 5 April 1976) is an Italian professional football manager and former player, currently in charge of Serie A club Lazio.

The younger brother of Filippo Inzaghi, Simone played as a striker for a host of clubs during his professional career, including Piacenza and Lazio; he remained for more than a decade at the Roman club, winning major honours including the Double, but also spending time on the bench and being sent on loan spells. He earned 3 caps for Italy, during as many years.

Following his retirement from playing, he embarked on a managerial career, initially in Lazio's youth teams before taking charge of the senior side in 2016 and guiding them to conquer the Coppa Italia and twice the Supercoppa Italiana. As a manager, Inzaghi is known for employing the 3–5–2 formation, being one of several Italian coaches that have led a notable revival of this tactical system.[1][2]

Playing career[edit]

Club[edit]

Inzaghi started playing professionally in 1993 with hometown club Piacenza, although he did not get to feature in any matches with the first team in that season. The following year, he was loaned out to third division side Carpi; his first goal arrived in 1995–96, whilst at the service of Novara in the fourth level. After two more loan stints, at Lumezzane and U.S. Brescello, Inzaghi returned to Piacenza for the 1998–99 Serie A season, which would be his first in the top-flight of Italian football. He scored 15 goals in 30 matches and secured a transfer to powerhouses Lazio.

Despite stiff competition within a Lazio side packed with quality strikers such as Marcelo Salas and Alen Bokšić, the rotation policy of manager Sven-Göran Eriksson ensured that Inzaghi would get playing time; he appeared in 22 out of 34 Serie A matches in Lazio's highly successful 1999–2000 season scoring 7 goals, as his team went on to complete the domestic Double by winning both the Scudetto and the Coppa Italia. In the Champions League, as Lazio progressed from both the first and the second group stages to reach the quarter-finals, Inzaghi scored 9 goals in 11 games (including four in a single game against Marseille on 14 March 2000, equalling the competition record held by Marco van Basten since 1992).[3]

The following seasons were not so successful, but Inzaghi did help Lazio conquer another Coppa Italia, in 2003–04; in September of that year, he extended his contract until June 2009.[4] Inzaghi spent the latter half of the 2004–05 season with Sampdoria, as part of a six-month player exchange with Fabio Bazzani.[5] He returned to Lazio for the 2005–06 campaign and stayed for the following, with only 12 appearances combined. The following season, Inzaghi joined Atalanta on loan.[6] Although he struggled to find his form early on, he managed to play in 19 league matches, mostly as a second-half substitute, but did not find the net.

Inzaghi returned to Lazio in 2008–09, despite not being in the plans of manager Delio Rossi.[7] A move away did not materialise and Inzaghi made his comeback in a 2–0 Cup win over former team Atalanta;[8] the season would end with Lazio winning the Coppa Italia, Inzaghi's third triumph in this competition, although he did not get to play in the final.[9] In the Serie A, Inzaghi made his first league appearance of the season in October, coming from the bench and scoring an equaliser two minutes from time to rescue a point against Lecce, in a 1–1 home draw;[10] it was his first Serie A goal since September 2004, but he would only appear in 12 games over two years, choosing to retire in the summer of 2010 at the age of 34.

International[edit]

Inzaghi played 3 times for Italy, in friendly matches. His first appearance came under Dino Zoff on 29 March 2000, in a 0–2 away loss against Spain in Barcelona. He came on in the 60th minute for Stefano Fiore, partnering his older brother Filippo upfront;[11] he made two more appearances for his country under Giovanni Trapattoni, in a 1–0 win over England in Turin on 15 November later the same year[12] and in another 1–0 win against Romania in Ancona, on 16 November 2003.[13]

Style of play[edit]

Throughout his career, Inzaghi's playing style was compared to that of his older brother Filippo and Paolo Rossi. Although he was not particularly skilful from a technical standpoint, he was a tall and fast striker with a slender physique, who was mainly known for his eye for goal, ability to play on the edge of the offside trap and clinical finishing inside the penalty area, in particular from close range, due to his opportunism and positional sense.[14]

Managerial career[edit]

Lazio[edit]

Following his retirement, Inzaghi remained with Lazio, managing its Allievi and Primavera sides.[15][16] On 3 April 2016, he was appointed at the senior team on an interim basis following the sacking of Stefano Pioli.[17]

For the 2016–17 season, Inzaghi was originally replaced by Marcelo Bielsa. However, as the Argentine left his post after less than one week due to undisclosed reasons, he was named as permanent manager.[18][19] He guided the team to fifth place in the domestic league as well as the final of the Italian Cup, lost to Juventus; on 7 June 2017, he renewed his contract until 2020.[20]

The 2017–18 campaign started with a high note, as Lazio defeated Juventus in the Supercoppa Italiana with a 3–2 result.[21] They again finished fifth in Serie A, missing out on Champions League qualification on the final matchday after a 2–3 home loss to Inter Milan.[22]

The 2018–19 season saw the side win the domestic cup 2–0 over Atalanta, conquering their seventh title overall and automatically qualifying for the group stage of the UEFA Europa League.[23]

On 22 December 2019, Inzaghi captured his second Supercoppa Italiana title with Lazio, following a 3–1 victory over Juventus.[24]

Personal life[edit]

Born in Piacenza, Emilia-Romagna, Simone Inzaghi is the younger brother of Filippo Inzaghi, who also became a footballer and striker. A world-class forward, Filippo had very successful spells with Juventus and A.C. Milan, winning all domestic Italian titles as well as the UEFA Champions League twice, while also helping the Italy national team win the 2006 FIFA World Cup.[25][26]

Simone Inzaghi has two sons, Tommaso (born 29 April 2001), with actress and television presenter Alessia Marcuzzi,[27] and Lorenzo (born 14 April 2013), with Gaia Lucariello.[28]

Career statistics[edit]

Club[edit]

[29][30]

Club performance League Cup Continental Total
Season Club League Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Italy League Coppa Italia Europe Total
1993–94 Piacenza Serie A 0 0 0 0
1994–95 Carpi (loan) Serie C1 9 0 9 0
1995–96 Novara (loan) Serie C2 23 4 23 4
1996–97 Lumezzane (loan) Serie C2 23 6 23 6
1997–98 Piacenza Serie A 0 0 1 0 1 0
1997–98 Brescello (loan) Serie C1 21 10 21 10
1998–99 Piacenza Serie A 30 15 0 0 30 15
1999–2000 Lazio Serie A 22 7 6 3 11 9 39 19
2000–01 13 4 1 0 9 3 23 7
2001–02 20 5 2 1 6 0 28 6
2002–03 18 4 3 1 8 4 29 9
2003–04 23 6 4 1 5 3 32 10
2004–05 12 1 1 0 3 1 16 2
2004–05 Sampdoria (loan) Serie A 5 0 2 0 7 0
2005–06 Lazio Serie A 7 0 2 1 0 0 9 1
2006–07 5 0 0 0 5 0
2007–08 Atalanta (loan) Serie A 19 0 0 0 19 0
2008–09 Lazio Serie A 9 1 1 0 10 1
2009–10 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
Country Italy 262 63 23 7 42 20 327 90
Total 262 63 23 7 42 20 327 90

International[edit]

[31]

Italy
Year Apps Goals
2000 2 0
2001 0 0
2002 0 0
2003 1 0
Total 3 0

Managerial statistics[edit]

As of match played 29 February 2020
Managerial record by team and tenure
Team Nat From To Record
G W D L GF GA GD Win %
Lazio Italy 3 April 2016 Present 192 106 35 51 364 234 +130 055.21
Total 192 106 35 51 364 234 +130 055.21

Honours[edit]

Player[edit]

Novara[29]

Lazio[29]

Manager[edit]

Lazio[29]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lega Serie A Lazio v Juventus, Match Report and Formations, 7 December 2019
  2. ^ Lega Serie A Lazio v Parma, Match Report and Formations, 22 September 2019
  3. ^ "Lazio 5–1 Marseille". UEFA. 14 March 2000. Retrieved 4 February 2016.
  4. ^ New deal for Inzaghi; UEFA, 15 September 2004
  5. ^ Inzaghi and Bazzani trade places; UEFA, 10 January 2005
  6. ^ Inzaghi handed fresh task at Atalanta; UEFA, 29 August 2007
  7. ^ Imparato, Ilario (24 October 2006). "Lazio, Rossi: "Nulla contro Simone Inzaghi"" [Lazio, Rossi: "Nothing against Simone Inzaghi"] (in Italian). Tutto Mercato Web. Retrieved 4 February 2016.
  8. ^ Ponticiello, Francesco (1 October 2008). "Lazio-Atalanta 2–0 (17' Ledesma, 84' Pandev)" (in Italian). La Lazio Siamo Noi. Retrieved 4 February 2016.
  9. ^ "Lazio-Atalanta 2–0 (17' Ledesma, 84' Pandev)" (in Italian). La Lazio Siamo Noi. 1 October 2008. Retrieved 4 February 2016.
  10. ^ "Inter catch Lazio in pole position". UEFA. 4 October 2008. Retrieved 1 September 2010.
  11. ^ Padovan, Giancarlo; Costa, Alberto (30 March 2000). "La Spagna chiude all'angolo l'Italia" [Spain finish Italy from the corner]. Corriere della Sera (in Italian). Archived from the original on 29 October 2013. Retrieved 24 July 2017.
  12. ^ "Gattuso lancia l'Italia contro l'Inghilterra" [Gattuso propels Italy against England]. La Repubblica (in Italian). 15 November 2000. Retrieved 24 July 2017.
  13. ^ "Italia-Romania 1–0" [Italy-Romania 1–0] (in Italian). Italia 1910. Retrieved 24 July 2017.
  14. ^ Kuper, Simon (9 April 2000). "The wonderful tale of Mamma Inzaghi and her boys". The Guardian. Retrieved 27 March 2017.
  15. ^ Raimondo, Elia (5 February 2013). "Filippo e Simone Inzaghi, due carriere da allenatore che vanno avanti di pari passo: dagli Allievi alle Primavera di Milan e Lazio" [Filippo and Simone Inzaghi, two coaching careers that go hand in hand: from the Allievi to the Primavera of Milan and Lazio] (in Italian). Goal. Retrieved 4 February 2016.
  16. ^ "Lazio, Simone Inzaghi è il nuovo allenatore della Primavera" [Lazio, Simone Inzaghi is the new Primavera coach]. La Stampa (in Italian). 7 January 2014. Retrieved 4 February 2016.
  17. ^ "Official: Lazio sack Pioli". Football Italia. 3 April 2016. Retrieved 3 April 2016.
  18. ^ "Lazio: Marcelo Bielsa quits as coach of Serie A side after two days". BBC Sport. 8 July 2016. Retrieved 20 September 2016.
  19. ^ "Comunicato 08.07.2016" [Press release 08.07.2016] (in Italian). S.S. Lazio. 8 July 2016. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  20. ^ "Official: Inzaghi at Lazio until 2020". Football Italia. 7 June 2017. Retrieved 7 June 2017.
  21. ^ "Lazio beat Juventus in dramatic Italian Super Cup". BBC Sport. 13 August 2017. Retrieved 15 May 2019.
  22. ^ Della Sala, Andrea (20 May 2018). "Inzaghi: "La Lazio ha dominato. Inter in Champions senza far fare parate a Strakosha"" [Inzaghi: “Lazio dominated. Inter in Champions without forcing Strakosha to make a save”] (in Italian). FC Inter 1908. Retrieved 15 May 2019.
  23. ^ "Coppa Italia: Atalanta bow to Lazio". Football Italia. 15 May 2019. Retrieved 15 May 2019.
  24. ^ "Lazio beat Juventus again to win Italian Supercup". ESPN FC. 22 December 2019. Retrieved 27 December 2019.
  25. ^ Ferrazzi, Enrico (11 March 2013). "Simone Inzaghi: "Mio fratello Filippo ha tutto per diventare un grande allenatore"" [Simone Inzaghi: "My brother Filippo has everything to become a great coach"] (in Italian). Milan News. Retrieved 4 February 2016.
  26. ^ "Simone Inzaghi come il fratello: "Sogno di allenare la Lazio"" [Simone Inzaghi like his brother: "I dream of coaching Lazio"] (in Italian). Goal. 19 May 2014. Retrieved 4 February 2016.
  27. ^ "Alessia Marcuzzi con Francesco Facchinetti, Simone Inzaghi, Mia e Tommaso: Natale in famiglia… allargatissima!" [Alessia Marcuzzi with Francesco Facchinetti, Simone Inzaghi, Mia and Tommaso: Christmas in family… a very extended one!] (in Italian). Oggi. 24 December 2013. Retrieved 4 February 2016.
  28. ^ "Simone Inzaghi papà! Gaia Lucariello gli ha donato Lorenzo". 17 April 2013.
  29. ^ a b c d "S. Inzaghi". Soccerway. Retrieved 4 February 2016.
  30. ^ "Simone Inzaghi". Footballdatabase. Retrieved 4 February 2016.
  31. ^ "Simone Inzaghi". European Football. Retrieved 4 February 2016.
  32. ^ "Lazio beat Juventus 3–1 to win Italian Super Cup in Saudi Arabia". BBC Sport. 22 December 2019. Retrieved 22 December 2019.

External links[edit]