Simone Inzaghi

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Simone Inzaghi
Simone Inzaghi 2.jpg
Personal information
Full name Simone Inzaghi
Date of birth (1976-04-05) 5 April 1976 (age 40)
Place of birth Piacenza, Italy
Height 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in)
Playing position Striker
Club information
Current team
Lazio (caretaker)
Youth career
1992–1994 Piacenza
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1994–1999 Piacenza 30 (15)
1994–1995 Carpi (loan) 9 (0)
1995–1996 Novara (loan) 23 (4)
1996–1997 Lumezzane (loan) 23 (6)
1997–1998 → Brescello (loan) 21 (10)
1999–2010 Lazio 129 (28)
2005 Sampdoria (loan) 5 (0)
2007–2008 Atalanta (loan) 19 (0)
Total 240 (53)
National team
1993–1994 Italy U18 4 (1)
2000–2003 Italy 3 (0)
Teams managed
2010–2016 Lazio (youth)
2016 Lazio
2016– Lazio (caretaker)

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.


Simone Inzaghi (born 5 April 1976) is an Italian former footballer who played as a striker, and is the caretaker manager of Lazio.[1]

He played for a host of clubs during his professional career, including his hometown club Piacenza, and Lazio, where he remained for more than a decade, being used irregularly, and was later sent on several loan spells. At international level, he obtained 3 caps for the Italy national team.

Playing career[edit]

Born in Piacenza, Emilia-Romagna, Inzaghi started playing professionally in 1993 with hometown club Piacenza Calcio, although he did not get to play any games with the first team in that season. The following year, he was loaned out to third division side Carpi FC 1909; his first goal arrived in 1995–96, whilst at the service of Novara Calcio in the fourth level.

After two more loan stints, at lowly A.C. Lumezzane and U.S. Brescello, Inzaghi returned to Piacenza and appeared in his first competitive match (also his first Serie A match) during 1998–99. He finished the campaign with 15 goals from 30 appearances.

Inzaghi was signed by S.S. Lazio for the next season, and had a productive first year by scoring seven times in the league and nine in just 11 UEFA Champions League games (including four in a single game against Olympique de Marseille on 14 March 2000, with which he equaled the competition record held by Marco van Basten since 1992[2]). He also made his debut for the Italian national team two weeks later against Spain, as his team went on to win both the Scudetto and the Italian Cup, with the player helping them conquer the latter trophy again in 2004; in September of that year, he extended his contract until June 2009.[3]

Midway through 2004–05, Inzaghi was involved in a six-month player exchange, with Fabio Bazzani going to U.C. Sampdoria.[4] He returned to Lazio for the 2005–06 campaign and stayed for the following, with only twelve appearances combined.

The following season, Inzaghi joined Atalanta B.C. on loan.[5] Although he struggled to find his form early on, he managed to play in 19 league contests, mostly as a second-half substitute, but did not find the net.

Inzaghi returned to Lazio in 2008–09, despite not being in the plans of manager Delio Rossi.[6] A move away did not materialize and, despite few pre-season trainings with the squad, he remained on payroll, making his comeback in a 2–0 domestic cup win over former team Atalanta.[7] Just three days later, he made his first league appearance of the season, coming from the bench and scoring an equaliser two minutes from time to rescue a point against U.S. Lecce, in a 1–1 home draw;[8] it was his first Serie A goal since September 2004, but he would only appear in 12 games over the course of two years, choosing to retire in the 2010 summer at the age of 34.

Managerial career[edit]

Following his retirement, Inzaghi remained with Lazio, coaching its Allievi and Primavera sides.[9][10] On 3 April 2016, he was appointed at the senior team following the sacking of Stefano Pioli.[11]

Personal life[edit]

Inzaghi's older brother, Filippo, was also a footballer and a striker. Also having started with Piacenza, he played for more than a decade with A.C. Milan, appearing more than 50 times for Italy and helping the national team win the 2006 FIFA World Cup.[12][13]

He has one son, Tommaso (born 29 April 2001), with model and actress Alessia Marcuzzi.[14]

Statistics[edit]

Club[edit]

[15][16]

Club performance League Cup Continental Total
Season Club League Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Italy League Coppa Italia Europe Total
1993–94 Piacenza Serie A 0 0 - - 0 0
1994–95 Carpi Serie C1 9 0 - - 9 0
1995–96 Novara Serie C2 23 4 - - 23 4
1996–97 Lumezzane Serie C2 23 6 - - 23 6
1997–98 Piacenza Serie A 0 0 1 0 - 1 0
1997–98 Brescello Serie C1 21 10 - - 21 10
1998–99 Piacenza Serie A 30 15 0 0 - 30 15
1999–00 Lazio Serie A 22 7 6 3 11 9 39 19
2000–01 13 4 1 0 9 3 23 7
2001–02 20 5 2 1 6 0 28 6
2002–03 18 4 3 1 8 4 29 9
2003–04 23 6 4 1 5 3 32 10
2004–05 12 1 1 0 3 1 16 2
2004–05 Sampdoria Serie A 5 0 2 0 - 7 0
2005–06 Lazio Serie A 7 0 2 1 0 0 9 1
2006–07 5 0 0 0 - 5 0
2007–08 Atalanta Serie A 19 0 0 0 - 19 0
2008–09 Lazio Serie A 9 1 1 0 - 10 1
2009–10 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
Country Italy 262 63 23 7 42 20 327 90
Total 262 63 23 7 42 20 327 90

International[edit]

[17]

Italy
Year Apps Goals
2000 2 0
2001 0 0
2002 0 0
2003 1 0
Total 3 0

Honours[edit]

Player[edit]

Novara[15]
Lazio[15]

Managerial statistics[edit]

As of 15 May 2016
Team Nat Year Record
G W D L Win %
Lazio Italy 2016 7 4 0 3 57.14
Career Total 7 4 0 3 57.14

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ "Lazio 5–1 Marseille". UEFA.com. 14 March 2000. Retrieved 4 February 2016. 
  3. ^ New deal for Inzaghi; UEFA.com, 15 September 2004
  4. ^ Inzaghi and Bazzani trade places; UEFA.com, 10 January 2005
  5. ^ Inzaghi handed fresh task at Atalanta; UEFA.com, 29 August 2007
  6. ^ "Lazio, Rossi: "Nulla contro Simone Inzaghi"" [Lazio, Rossi: "Nothing against Simone Inzaghi"] (in Italian). Tutto Mercato Web. 24 October 2006. Retrieved 4 February 2016. 
  7. ^ "Lazio-Atalanta 2–0 (17' Ledesma, 84' Pandev)" (in Italian). La Lazio Siamo Noi. 1 October 2008. Retrieved 4 February 2016. 
  8. ^ Inter catch Lazio in pole position; UEFA.com, 4 October 2008
  9. ^ "Filippo e Simone Inzaghi, due carriere da allenatore che vanno avanti di pari passo: dagli Allievi alle Primavera di Milan e Lazio" [Filippo and Simone Inzaghi, two coaching careers that go hand in hand: from the Allievi to the Primavera of Milan and Lazio] (in Italian). Goal.com. 5 February 2013. Retrieved 4 February 2016. 
  10. ^ "Lazio, Simone Inzaghi è il nuovo allenatore della Primavera" [Lazio, Simone Inzaghi is the new Primavera coach] (in Italian). La Stampa. 7 January 2014. Retrieved 4 February 2016. 
  11. ^ "Official: Lazio sack Pioli". Football Italia. 3 April 2016. Retrieved 3 April 2016. 
  12. ^ "Simone Inzaghi: "Mio fratello Filippo ha tutto per diventare un grande allenatore"" [Simone Inzaghi: "My brother Filippo has everything to become a great coach"] (in Italian). Milan News. 11 March 2013. Retrieved 4 February 2016. 
  13. ^ "Simone Inzaghi come il fratello: "Sogno di allenare la Lazio"" [Simone Inzaghi like his brother: "I dream of coaching Lazio"] (in Italian). Goal.com. 19 May 2014. Retrieved 4 February 2016. 
  14. ^ "Alessia Marcuzzi con Francesco Facchinetti, Simone Inzaghi, Mia e Tommaso: Natale in famiglia… allargatissima!" [Alessia Marcuzzi with Francesco Facchinetti, Simone Inzaghi, Mia and Tommaso: Christmas in family… a very extended one!] (in Italian). Oggi (magazine). 24 December 2013. Retrieved 4 February 2016. 
  15. ^ a b c "S. Inzaghi". Soccerway. Retrieved 4 February 2016. 
  16. ^ "Simone Inzaghi". Footballdatabase. Retrieved 4 February 2016. 
  17. ^ "Simone Inzaghi". European Football. Retrieved 4 February 2016. 

External links[edit]