Simultaneous game

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Rock–paper–scissors is an example of a simultaneous game.

In game theory, a simultaneous game is a game where each player chooses his action without knowledge of the actions chosen by other players.[1] Simultaneous games contrast with sequential games, which are played by the players taking turns (moves alternate between players). Normal form representations are usually used for simultaneous games.[citation needed]

Rock-paper-scissors, a widely played hand game, is an example of a simultaneous game. Both players make a decision without knowledge of the opponent's decision, and reveal their hands at the same time. There are two players in this game and each of them has three different strategies to make their decision; the combination of strategy profiles forms a 3×3 table. We will display Player 1’s strategies as rows and Player 2’s strategies as columns. In the table, the numbers in red represent the payoff to Player 1, the numbers in blue represent the payoff to Player 2. Hence, the pay off for a 2 player game in rock-paper-scissors will look like this:

Player 2

Player 1
Rock Paper Scissors
Rock
0
0
1
-1
-1
1
Paper
-1
1
0
0
1
-1
Scissors
1
-1
-1
1
0
0

The prisoner's dilemma is also an example of a simultaneous game. Some variants of chess that belong to this class of games include Synchronous chess [2] and Parity chess.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www-bcf.usc.edu The Path to Equilibrium in Sequential and Simultaneous Games (Brocas, Carrillo, Sachdeva; 2016).
  2. ^ Pritchard (2007), p. 100
  3. ^ A V, Murali (2014-10-07). "Parity Chess". Blogger. Retrieved 2017-01-15. 

Bibliography