Herbert Taylor (British Army officer)

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Sir Herbert Taylor

Sir Herbert Taylor GCB GCH.jpg
Sir Herbert Taylor by John Simpson
Private Secretary to the Sovereign
In office
1830–1837
MonarchWilliam IV
Preceded bySir William Knighton, Bt.
Succeeded byHRH Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (unofficial)
Private Secretary to the Sovereign
In office
1805–1811
MonarchGeorge III
Preceded byNew post
Succeeded byCol. The Rt. Hon. Sir John McMahon, Bt.
Personal details
Born29 September 1775 (1775-09-29)
Died20 March 1839 (1839-03-21) (aged 63)
NationalityBritish

Lieutenant-General Sir Herbert Taylor GCB GCH (29 September 1775 – 20 March 1839) was the first Private Secretary to the Sovereign of the United Kingdom, serving Kings George III, George IV and William IV.

Military career[edit]

Taylor was the son of Rev. Edward Taylor of Bifrons, Patrixbourne, Kent and his wife Margaret Payler[1] daughter of Thomas Turner Payler of Ileden, who died at Brussels in 1780.[2] He joined the 2nd Dragoon Guards as a cornet in 1794.[3] Later that year he was promoted to lieutenant and then the following year to captain.[3] In 1795 he served as assistant secretary and aide de camp to the Duke of York, then commander-in-chief of the British Army.[3] Taylor was later the Duke of York's assistant military secretary, an office he held until 1798.[3] He was later a Major. In 1798 he was made Aide de Camp, Military Secretary and Private Secretary to the Marquess Cornwallis, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland.[3] In the following year he returned to the Duke of York's service and remained there until 1805, although he was transferred to the 9th West Indian Regiment as a lieutenant-colonel in 1801.[3]

However, in the following year, with a period of relative calm in the midst of the Napoleonic Wars, he was placed on half pay.[3] In that year he joined the Coldstream Guards, in which he became a brevet colonel in 1810. In 1805 he became private secretary to King George III, and then, from 1811 private secretary to Queen Charlotte, the queen consort.[3] He retained that office until 1818.

Taylor commanded a brigade at Antwerp 1813–1814, and was sent on a diplomatic mission to Bernadotte of Sweden in 1814.[3] He was Member of Parliament (MP) for Windsor 1820–23.[3] From 1820 to 1827 he was Ambassador to Berlin and then Military Secretary,[3] having become colonel for life of the 85th Foot Regiment in 1823. He was first and principal aide de camp to King George IV in 1827, and also deputy Secretary at War.[3] From 1828 to 1830 he was Adjutant-General to the Forces.[3] He became private secretary to the new king, William IV, in 1830.[3] On the death of the king in 1837 he retired, although he was first and principal aide de camp to Queen Victoria 1837–39.

Taylor became a Major-General in 1813, and a Lieutenant-General in 1825. He was Master of St Katherine's Hospital, Regent's Park, and Master Surveyor and Surveyor-General of the Ordnance from 1828. He died in 1839.[3] The monument to him at St. Katherine's is by the sculptor Peter Rouw.

Sir Brook Taylor[edit]

Brook Taylor (1776 – 15 October 1846) was Herbert Taylor's younger brother.[3] Brook Taylor joined the diplomatic service and was British minister to Hesse-Cassel and Cologne 1801–06,[4] to Denmark in 1807, to Württemberg 1814–20,[5] to Bavaria 1820–28 and to Prussia 1828–31.[6] He was knighted GCH in 1822, and was admitted to the Privy Council in 1829.[7] He deputised for Sir Herbert during the latter's absences from the court.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ John Burke A genealogical and heraldic history of the commoners of Great Britain Volume 3
  2. ^ Parishes: Patrixborne, The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent: Volume 9 (1800), pp. 277–286. Date accessed: 24 November 2010
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Herbert Taylor at Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
  4. ^ "No. 15336". The London Gazette. 10 February 1801. p. 174.
  5. ^ "No. 16915". The London Gazette. 9 July 1814. p. 1389.
  6. ^ "No. 18427". The London Gazette. 28 December 1827. p. 2644.
  7. ^ "No. 18620". The London Gazette. 16 October 1829. p. 1893.
  8. ^ Sir Brook Taylor (1776-1846), historyhome
Court offices
Preceded by
First appointment
Private Secretary to the Sovereign
1805–1811
Succeeded by
Sir John McMahon, Bt
Preceded by
The Earl of Effingham
Treasurer to Queen Charlotte
1817–1818
Death of Queen Charlotte
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
The Lord Graves
Member of Parliament for Windsor
1820–1823
With: John Ramsbottom
Succeeded by
Edward Cromwell Disbrowe
Military offices
Preceded by
Sir Henry Torrens
Military Secretary
1820–1827
Succeeded by
Lord FitzRoy Somerset
Preceded by
Sir Henry Torrens
Adjutant General
1828–1830
Succeeded by
Sir John Macdonald
Preceded by
Sir Edward Owen
Surveyor-General of the Ordnance
1828–1829
Succeeded by
Henry Fane
Court offices
Preceded by
Sir William Knighton, Bt
Private Secretary to the Sovereign
1830–1837
Succeeded by
HRH The Prince Albert, Prince Consort