Patrick Nairne

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Patrick Dalmahoy Nairne
Born 15 August 1921
Died 4 June 2013 (aged 91)
Nationality British
Alma mater Radley College
University College, Oxford
Occupation Civil Servant
Spouse(s) Penelope Chauncy Bridges (1948–2014)

Sir Patrick Nairne GCB MC PC (15 August 1921 – 4 June 2013[1]) was a senior British civil servant.[2] He was Permanent Secretary of the Department of Health and Social Security and Master of St Catherine's College, Oxford (1981–88).[3][4] Nairne was a member of the Privy Council of the United Kingdom, appointed in 1982 when he became a member of Lord Franks' official inquiry into the Falklands War, and a governor of the Ditchley Foundation.[3] He was Chancellor of the University of Essex from 1982 to 1997.[5] He was an Honorary Fellow of University College, Oxford.[6] Nairne was the first Chair of the Nuffield Council on Bioethics from 1991-1996.

Family[edit]

Patrick Nairne was the father of Sandy Nairne, Director of the National Portrait Gallery.[7] His other sons are twins, Andrew Nairne, Director of Kettle's Yard Cambridge and James Nairne, Head of Art at Cranleigh School. He also had three daughters.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Sir Patrick Nairne". Telegraph. 4 Jun 2013. Retrieved 2013-06-05. 
  2. ^ Anne Perkins and Jane Ashley, Shape Up, Sir Humphrey, BBC News, 28 March 2007.
  3. ^ a b The Governors, The Ditchley Foundation, UK.
  4. ^ Birthdays Aug 15–16, The Times, 15 August 2009.
  5. ^ "University of Essex Calendar". 
  6. ^ Honorary Fellows. University College Record, October 2010, page 14.
  7. ^ Jeremy Musson, Interview: Sandy Nairne, Country Life, 17 April 2008.
Political offices
Preceded by
Sir Philip Rogers
Permanent Secretary of the Department of Health and Social Security
1975-1981
Succeeded by
Kenneth Stowe
Academic offices
Preceded by
Alan Bullock
Master of St Catherine's College, Oxford
1981–1988
Succeeded by
Sir Brian Smith
Preceded by
Rab Butler
Chancellor of the University of Essex
1982–1997
Succeeded by
Michael Nolan