Sir Robert Long, 6th Baronet

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Monument in the church of St James, Draycot Cerne, sculpture by Joseph Wilton.

Sir Robert Long, 6th Baronet (1705 – 10 February 1767) was an English politician.

The only surviving son of Sir James Long, 5th Baronet and his wife Henrietta Greville, Long was baptised on 8 November 1705 at St Martin in the Fields, Westminster, London. Educated at Balliol College, Oxford, he succeeded his father as 6th Baronet on 16 March 1729, and inherited the family estates, including the manors of Draycot and Athelhampton.

He was elected Member of Parliament for the rotten borough of Wootton Bassett in 1734, and for Wiltshire in 1741.

He married on 29 May 1735 at Woodford, Essex, Emma Child, the daughter of Richard Tylney, 1st Earl Tylney, of Wanstead, (said to be possessed of 'almost revolting wealth'), and his wife Dorothy Glynn.

Sir Robert and Emma had two daughters and four sons including:

Many letters written by Sir Robert to his wife are held in the Wiltshire and Swindon Record Office, and furnish a picture of a happy marriage in the eighteenth century, illustrating a genuine affection for his wife, and fatherly love for his children, with nicknames such as 'Jemmy' and 'Dolly'. He had good-natured relationships with his dependants, even going so far as choosing material for a new dress for Lady Emma's companion.

Sir Robert Long died on 10 February 1767 and was buried at Draycot. His wife died on 8 March 1758.

Further reading[edit]

Sources[edit]

  • The Lion and the Rose - Ethel M. Richardson, 1922
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
John St John
John Crosse
Member of Parliament for Wootton Bassett
1734–1741
Served alongside: Nicholas Robinson
Succeeded by
Robert Neale
John Harvey-Thursby
Preceded by
John Ivory-Talbot
John Howe
Member of Parliament for Wiltshire
1741–1767
Served alongside: Edward Popham
Succeeded by
Edward Popham
Thomas Goddard
Baronetage of England
Preceded by
James Long
Baronet
(of Westminster)
1729–1767
Succeeded by
James Tylney-Long