Sirindhorn Dam

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Sirindhorn Dam
Dom Noi River.jpg
Downstream face of dam
Sirindhorn Dam is located in Thailand
Sirindhorn Dam
Location of Sirindhorn Dam in Thailand
Official name Sirindhorn Dam
Location Sirindhorn District, Ubon Ratchathani Province, Thailand
Coordinates 15°12′22.82″N 105°25′44.96″E / 15.2063389°N 105.4291556°E / 15.2063389; 105.4291556Coordinates: 15°12′22.82″N 105°25′44.96″E / 15.2063389°N 105.4291556°E / 15.2063389; 105.4291556
Construction began 1968
Opening date 1971
Owner(s) Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT)
Dam and spillways
Type of dam Earth core rockfill dam
Impounds Dom Noi River
Height 42 m (138 ft)
Length 940 m (3,080 ft)
Reservoir
Creates Sirindhorn Reservoir
Total capacity 1,966,000,000 m3 (1,593,862 acre·ft)
Catchment area 2,097 km2 (810 sq mi)
Surface area 288 km2 (111 sq mi)[1]
Maximum length 43 km (27 mi)
Maximum water depth Average: 5.1 m (17 ft)[2]
Power station
Operator(s) Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT)
Installed capacity 36 MW
Annual generation 90 GWh

The Sirindhorn Dam is located in the northeastern province of Ubon Ratchatani, Thailand. It impounds the Lam Dom Noi River, and its reservoir is the province's largest water resource. The dam was commissioned in 1971 to serve as a hydropower facility as well as to supply irrigation water. All of the electricity generated by the dam is destined for domestic markets. The dam was constructed and is owned and operated by the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand and is located in the Mekong River Basin, just upstream from the controversial Pak Mun Dam.

Some 2,000 villagers were resettled to make way for the dam's reservoir. Many claim they did not receive adequate compensation for the loss of their livelihood and only received compensation for 80% of their land. Furthermore, they claim that the land in the resettlement village is of poor quality and few crops can be grown, and that a proposed irrigation canal was never built.[3]

The reservoir and dam power the Sirindhorn Hydropower Plant, which has an installed capacity of 3 units of 12,000 kilowatts each and annual energy production of 90 GWh.[4]

There is a park near the dam headquarters and a restaurant and bungalows for visitors.[5] There is a golf course in this area also, at the north end of the lake.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Renovation of Small Hydropower Plants by Hydropower Construction Division in 2005". Hydro Power Construction Division. Archived from the original on 10 July 2011. Retrieved 12 March 2013. 
  2. ^ "Variations and patterns of fish yields in large reservoirs in Thailand" (PDF). National Institute for Environmental Studies (Japan). 17 January 2011. Retrieved 12 March 2013. 
  3. ^ Imhof, Aviva. "DAM-BUSTING - anti-dam protests in Thailand". The Ecologist. Archived from the original on 14 July 2012. Retrieved 6 March 2011. 
  4. ^ "Renovation of Small Hydropower Plants". Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand. Archived from the original on 10 July 2011. Retrieved 12 March 2013. 
  5. ^ Thailand (Eyewitness Travel Guides) (1st American ed.). DK Publishing, Inc. 1997. p. 289. ISBN 0-7894-1949-1. 
  6. ^ Sirindhorn Reservoir (Map). Google Maps. Retrieved 12 March 2013. 

External links[edit]