Sisi Ntombela

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Sisi Ntombela

6th Premier of the Free State
Assumed office
27 March 2018
Preceded byAce Magashule
Personal details
Born
Sefora Hixsonia Ntombela

1956/1957 (age 61–62)
Tweeling, Free State, South Africa
NationalitySouth Africa South African
Political partyAfrican National Congress
OccupationPolitician

Sefora Hixsonia "Sisi" Ntombela (born 1956/1957) is a South African politician who is the 6th Premier of the Free State and a Member of the Free State Provincial Legislature. She previously served as the Free State MEC for Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs and Human Settlements and Free State MEC for Social Development. Ntombela is the Deputy President of the African National Congress Women’s League.[1]

Early life and career[edit]

One of six children, Sefora Hixsonia Ntombela was born in the small farming town of Tweeling in the Free State. She was given the nickname of "Sisi" at a young age. She attended the Tweeling Combine School and matriculated from Kganyeng Secondary School. She went on to study at Bonamelo Training College and returned to the Tweeling Combine School as a teacher.

Due to Apartheid and the tense political situation at the time, she secretly taught her pupils about Nelson Mandela. One of the pupils was the school principal's child and reported her for the secret lessons. Due to the matter, she left the teaching profession.[2]

Political career[edit]

Ntombela worked for the Department of Health as a family planner and youth consultant.[3]

Later on, Ntombela officially became a member of the African National Congress and the chairperson of the Tweeling African National Congress Women's League branch. She soon became regional chairperson. Following the 1994 elections, Ntombela won the mayoral position of the Tweeling municipality and served in the position until her election to the Free State Provincial Legislature in 1999. She remained in the legislature until she was appointed a member of the National Assembly in 2001. In 2004, she returned to the Free State Provincial Legislature and subsequently took office as the chairperson of the Social Development and Health Portfolio Committee.[4]

In May 2009, newly-elected Free State Premier Ace Magashule announced that Ntombela would take up the post of MEC for Social Development. In August 2015, Ntombela was elected Deputy President of the African National Congress Women's League.[5]

In October 2016, Magashule reshuffled his Executive Council and appointed Ntombela to the Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs and Human Settlements portfolio of the Executive Council.[6][7]

In March 2018, Ntombela was selected by the African National Congress to succeed Ace Magashule as Premier of the Free State. On 27 March 2018, she took office and became the second female premier of the province.[8][9]

Following the May 2019, the African National Congress announced that it had retained Ntombela in her position as Premier of the Free State. She now serves a full term that commenced on 22 May 2019.[10][11]

Personal life[edit]

Ntombela is married to ANC Member of Parliament, Madala Louis David Ntombela.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sefora Hixsonia Ntombela. Retrieved on 29 April 2019.
  2. ^ Magashule apparently picked Ntombela to keep his grip on Free State. Retrieved on 29 April 2019.
  3. ^ "On the couch with...Sisi Ntombela | Dumelang News". www.dumelangnews.co.za. Retrieved 2018-04-22.
  4. ^ Premier takes over. Retrieved on 29 April 2019.
  5. ^ ANCWL nominates candidates for its top five positions. Retrieved on 29 April 2019.
  6. ^ Magashule chooses four women for council. Retrieved on 29 April 2019.
  7. ^ Ace Magashule reshuffles the Free State's cabinet, BusinessLIVE. Retrieved on 29 April 2019.
  8. ^ "ANC chooses women to be next premiers of Free State, Mpumalanga". News24. Retrieved 2018-04-22.
  9. ^ OFM. "#BreakingNews: Sisi Ntombela announced as new FS Premier". OFM. Retrieved 2018-04-22.
  10. ^ ANC announces premier candidates. Retrieved on 13 May 2019.
  11. ^ Meet SA's newly elected premiers. Retrieved on 22 May 2019.