Sixth Street Bridge (Grand Rapids, Michigan)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Sixth Street Bridge
Sixth Street Bridge 1.jpg
Sixth Street Bridge in 2011
Coordinates 42°58′36″N 85°40′26″W / 42.9767°N 85.674°W / 42.9767; -85.674Coordinates: 42°58′36″N 85°40′26″W / 42.9767°N 85.674°W / 42.9767; -85.674
Carries Automobiles
Crosses Grand River
Characteristics
Total length 536 feet (163 m)
No. of spans 4
History
Designer Massillon Bridge Company
Constructed by Massillon Bridge Company
Construction cost $31,000
Sixth Street Bridge
Sixth Street Bridge (Grand Rapids, Michigan) is located in Michigan
Sixth Street Bridge (Grand Rapids, Michigan)
Coordinates 42°58′36″N 85°40′26″W / 42.9767°N 85.674°W / 42.9767; -85.674
Built 1886
NRHP reference # 76001030[1]
Significant dates
Added to NRHP August 13, 1976
Designated MSHS June 18, 1976
References
[2]

The Sixth Street Bridge is a four-span, wrought iron bridge that crosses the Grand River in Grand Rapids, Michigan. It is a Michigan State Historic Site and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Built in 1886, it is the longest and oldest metal truss bridge in Michigan.

History[edit]

West end of bridge, seen in 2012, that was shortened

The Sixth Street Bridge was designed and built in 1886 by the Ohio-based Massillon Bridge Company for $31,000. The westernmost truss was shortened in 1921 when a canal along the river bank was filled in.[2]

The bridge faced demolition in 1975, but was saved through the efforts of concerned citizens. The bridge was designated a Michigan State Historic Site (MSHS) on June 18, 1976. On August 13, 1976, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. An MSHS informational marker was erected on April 6, 1981.[2] The bridge is also listed on MDOT's Historic Bridge Inventory.[3]

In May 2009, the bridge was briefly closed to film scenes of Caught in the Crossfire.[4]

The bridge underwent significant renovation in 2012, funded with a $1.8 million federal grant and $472,000 from the Downtown Development Authority.[5] Prior to renovation, the bridge was known for its "creaky" and "bumpy" ride.[5][6] Painting and sidewalk work took place in April 2012, leaving the bridge accessible for pedestrians. The bridge briefly reopened on May 12 for the Fifth Third River Bank Run. On May 14, the bridge was closed entirely to replace the existing wood decking and asphalt with steel decking and concrete.[7] The project's expected completion date was in August 2012.[6]

Design[edit]

Ornamental railings on the bridge

The bridge is 536 feet (163 m) in length, consisting of four parallel cord through Pratt trusses made of wrought iron.[2] The roadway is narrow at 19 feet (5.8 m) wide with two lanes.[2][5] Along each side is a 6-foot wide (1.8 m) sidewalk with ornamental railings. The piers and abutments are masonry and built of local Grand River limestone. The Sixth Street Bridge is the longest and oldest metal truss bridge in Michigan.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ National Park Service (March 13, 2009). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Staff. "Sixth Street Bridge". Historic Sites Online. Michigan State Housing Development Authority. Archived from the original on April 21, 2013. Retrieved March 5, 2013. 
  3. ^ Staff. "Sixth St./ Grand River". Michigan's Historic Bridges. Michigan Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 10, 2013. 
  4. ^ Odette, Dave (May 26, 2009). "Hollywood on the Grand: Sixth Street Bridge closed for movie scenes starring 50 Cent, Adam Rodriguez and Chris Klein". The Grand Rapids Press. Retrieved March 7, 2013. 
  5. ^ a b c Reens, Nate (November 15, 2011). "Grand Rapids Sixth Street bridge to get $2.3 million makeover, close for 3 months". The Grand Rapids Press. Retrieved March 10, 2013. 
  6. ^ a b Bunte, Matt Vande (March 2, 2012). "Sixth Street Bridge work scheduled, Grand River crossing to close for 3 months". The Grand Rapids Press. Retrieved March 10, 2013. 
  7. ^ Clark, Chris (April 18, 2012). "River Bank racers will get brief control of closed Sixth Street bridge (photos)". The Grand Rapids Press. Retrieved March 10, 2013. 

External links[edit]