Skeet (Newfoundland)

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Skeet is a stereotype and pejorative epithet in Newfoundland English, describing a lower class youth, "ignorant, aggressive and unruly," of low education, often wearing sportswear, or more traditionally, leather jackets, and associated with loitering, non-standard English language, drug and alcohol use, and petty crime.[1] The term is similar to the English chav or American white trash[2][3] or wigger.[4] Sandra Clarke suggests the term may be related to the Prince Edward Island word skite (a young scoundrel).[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hip-hop on the East Side: A Multi-sited Ethnography of Breakdancing and Rap Music from St. John’s and Grand Falls, Newfoundland. Kelly Best, Memorial University, Newfoundland and Labrador Studies, Volume 22, Number 1 (2007)
  2. ^ How To Speak Like a Maritimer. Gregory Pike, Vice, August 7 2012
  3. ^ a b Sandra Clarke (2010). Newfoundland and Labrador English. Edinburgh University Press. pp. 151–. ISBN 978-0-7486-2617-5. 
  4. ^ Skeets they Aren’t just for Shooting Anymore. Elliott Barrett, Sporting Life 360, May 15, 2007 Archived February 2, 2014, at the Wayback Machine.

Further reading[edit]