FIS Ski Jumping World Cup

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For the upcoming season, see 2016–17 FIS Ski Jumping World Cup.
Ski Jumping World Cup
Bundesarchiv Bild 183-1989-0131-036, Oberwiesenthal, Jens Weißflog.jpg
Genre ski jumping (1808)
ski flying (1936)
Location(s) Europe
Japan
Russia
Kazakhstan
Canada (rare)
United States (rare)
South Korea (2017)
Inaugurated 27 December 1979 (27 December 1979) (men)
12 January 1992 (12 January 1992) (men's team)
3 December 2011 (3 December 2011) (ladies)
23 November 2012 (23 November 2012) (mixed)
Founder Norway Torbjørn Yggeseth
Organised by International Ski Federation
People Austria Walter Hofer (men)
Japan Chika Yoshida (ladies)
Sponsor Viessmann, Konica Minolta

The FIS Ski Jumping World Cup is the world's highest level of ski jumping and the FIS Ski Flying World Cup as the subdivisional part of the competition. It was founded by Torbjørn Yggeseth for the 1979/80 season and organized by the International Ski Federation. Ladies began competing during the 2011/12 season.[1]

The rounds are hosted primarily in Europe, with regular stops in Japan and rarely in North America. These have been hosted in 19 different countries around the world for both men and ladies: Austria, Bosnia, Canada, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Norway, Poland, Russia, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, Switzerland and the United States.[2][nb 1] In 2017 in the preolympic season South Korea will join in the list as a new world cup host country.

Summer Grand Prix is the top level summer competition on plastic. The lower competitive circuits include the Continental Cup, the FIS Cup, the FIS Race and the Alpen Cup.

Contents

Global map of all world cup hosts[edit]

All 64 locations around the globe which have been hosting world cup events for men (57) and ladies (20) at least one time in the history of this competition. Pyeongchang is the next new upcoming host in 2017.

FIS Ski Jumping World Cup (Asia)
FIS Ski Jumping World Cup (North America)

Green pog.svg Four Hills Tournament (1979– ) Blue pog.svg Nordic Tour (1997–2010); Norwegian Tournament (2017– ) Orange pog.svg Swiss Tour (1980–1992) Black pog.svg Bohemia Tour (1981–1994) Pink pog.svg Nordic Tour (1997–2010) Yellow pog.svg FIS Team Tour (Oberstdorf included, 2009–2013)

The greatest ski jumpers ever[edit]

Individual results only. Ranked as best combination of all: world cup overall; olympic, nordic/ski flying world championships titles and medals; four hills tournaments; ski flying titles; world cup wins and podiums; world records. Because the competitions, rules and world cup points are distributed in the same way, the scoring system table is copied from ski database which is used for alpine skiing super ranking. Four Hills Tournament titles, world records and Ski Flying World Championships are newly added.[3] (updated: 20 March 2016)

Scoring system[edit]

Each season consists of 25–30 competitions, usually two competitions on the same hill during a weekend. One competition consists of a qualifying round, first round and second round. The top 10 jumpers in FIS ranking qualify directly to the first round, while the rest of the jumpers fight for the remaining 40 spots. The top 30 men in the first round advance to the second round, which is held in reverse order, so the best jumper in the first round jumps last. The aggregate score in the first and second rounds determine the competition results. The top 30 are awarded World Cup points. The winner gets 100 points while number 30 receives 1 point. At team events only top 8 receive points.

Men's standings[edit]

The table below shows the three highest ranked jumpers each year.

Tournaments[edit]

Next to the most prestigious Four Hills Tournament there are other tournaments as part of world cup:

Ladies' standings[edit]

Titles[edit]

Men's statistics[edit]

  still active career

Ski Flying statistics[edit]

For full details, see FIS Ski Flying World Cup.

Ladies' statistics[edit]

  retired female ski jumper

As of 28 February 2016

Team events[edit]

Various[edit]

As of 20 March 2016

World Cup winners by nations[edit]

The table below lists those nations which have won at least one World Cup race (current as of 20 March 2016).

Hosts[edit]

Timeline calendar[edit]

Season   Men   Team (M)   Ladies   Mixed
FH LH NH Total FH LH NH Total LH NH Total NH Total
1979/80 1 16 8 25
1980/81 2 14 8 24
1981/82 3 10 9 22
1982/83 3 15 7 25
1983/84 2 14 8 24
1984/85 1 12 8 21
1985/86 2 14 9 25
1986/87 2 10 10 22
1987/88 12 8 20
1988/89 1 11 8 20
1989/90 16 9 25
1990/91 4 13 5 22
1991/92 3 12 6 21 2 2
1992/93 2 13 2 17 2 2
1993/94 1 11 7 19 2 2
1994/95 3 11 7 21 1 1
1995/96 3 16 9 28 4 4
1996/97 4 19 2 25 1 1
1997/98 4 19 4 27
1998/99 3 23 3 29 1 1
1999/00 2 22 2 26 1 2 3
2000/01 5 16 21 1 3 4
2001/02 21 1 22 1 3 1 5
2002/03 4 23 27 1 1 2
2003/04 1 22 23 2 2
2004/05 4 24 28 3 3
2005/06 2 20 22 2 2
2006/07 4 20 24 2 2
2007/08 3 22 2 27 1 2 3
2008/09 6 20 1 27 3 3 6
2009/10 3 20 23 1 3 4
2010/11 7 19 26 2 3 5
2011/12 5 19 2 26 2 3 1 6 13 13
2012/13 7 17 3 27 2 4 6 1 15 16 1 1
2013/14 2 25 1 28 4 4 2 16 18 1 1
2014/15 5 25 1 31 1 4 5 1 12 13
2015/16 6 20 3 29 1 5 6 1 15 16
Total events 110 636 153 899 17 62 2 81 5 71 76 2 2
Double wins 1 8 1 10 2 2
Total winners 111 644 154 909 17 62 2 81 5 73 78 2 2

Last updated: 20 March 2016

All-time records[edit]

Double wins[edit]

Men[edit]

No. Season Date Place Hill Size Winners
1 1981/82 3 January 1982 Austria Innsbruck Bergiselschanze K104 LH East Germany Manfred Deckert Norway Per Bergerud
2 1985/86 19 January 1986 East Germany Oberwiesenthal Fichtelbergschanzen K90 NH East Germany Ulf Findeisen Austria Ernst Vettori
3 1988/89 14 January 1989 Czechoslovakia Liberec Ještěd A K120 LH Czechoslovakia Pavel Ploc Norway Jon Inge Kjørum
4 1989/90 11 February 1990 Switzerland Engelberg Gross-Titlis-Schanze K120 LH Finland Ari-Pekka Nikkola Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Franci Petek
5 1990/91 1 January 1991 Germany Garmisch-Partenkirchen Große Olympiaschanze K107 LH Germany Jens Weißflog Austria Andreas Felder
6 1995/96 21 January 1996 Japan Sapporo Ōkurayama K115 LH Finland Ari-Pekka Nikkola Austria Andreas Goldberger
7 2004/05 29 January 2005 Poland Zakopane Wielka Krokiew HS 134 (night) LH Poland Adam Małysz Norway Roar Ljøkelsøy
8 2010/11 12 February 2011 Norway Vikersund Vikersundbakken HS 225 (night) FH Austria Gregor Schlierenzauer Norway Johan Remen Evensen
9 2012/13 17 March 2013 Norway Oslo Holmenkollbakken HS 134 LH Austria Gregor Schlierenzauer Poland Piotr Żyła
10 2014/15 29 November 2014 Finland Ruka Rukatunturi HS 142 (night) LH Switzerland Simon Ammann Japan Noriaki Kasai

Ladies[edit]

No. Season Date Place Hill Size Winners
1 2012/13 9 December 2012 Russia Sochi RusSki Gorki HS 106 NH Austria Daniela Iraschko-Stolz France Coline Mattel
2 2014/15 15 February 2015 Slovenia Ljubno Savina Ski Jumping Center HS 95 NH Austria Daniela Iraschko-Stolz Japan Sara Takanashi

Key people[edit]

Torbjørn Yggeseth was a founder and a leader of this competition for the first 13 seasons. A new function called Race Director was introduced by International Ski Federation in 1992/93 with its first president Walter Hofer. Before that season this function didn't exist.[4] In the premiere Ladies 2011/12 World Cup season Chika Yoshida was entitled as World Cup Coordinator, but since the season 2012/13 Yoshida is called Race Director.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Note that the rounds hosted in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Slovakia were held when the countries were still part of Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia respectively.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Eric Williams (9 June 2010). "FIS approves World Cup circuit for women's ski jumping". Skiracing. Retrieved 17 January 2016. 
  2. ^ "FIS: Complete Calendar of FIS Ski Jumping and Ski Flying World Cup races". Retrieved 6 May 2013. 
  3. ^ "Super Ranking for alpine skiing". ski-db. 15 July 2016. 
  4. ^ "Walter Hofer: "Man muss auf dem Boden bleiben"". kleine zeitung. Retrieved 4 August 2012. 

External links[edit]