Ski jumping at the 2010 Winter Olympics – Normal hill individual

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Men's normal hill individual
at the XXI Olympic Winter Games
Ski jumping pictogram.svg
Venue Whistler Olympic Park
Dates 12–13 February
Competitors 61 from 18 nations
Winning Score 276.5
Medalists
1st, gold medalist(s) Simon Ammann  Switzerland
2nd, silver medalist(s) Adam Małysz  Poland
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Gregor Schlierenzauer  Austria
← 2006
2014 →
Ski jumping at the 2010 Winter Olympics
Ski jumping pictogram.svg
Normal hill   men  
Large hill men
Team men

The men's normal hill individual ski jumping competition for the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, Canada was held on 12 and 13 February 2010 at Whistler Olympic Park in Whistler, British Columbia. It was the first medal event of the 2010 Games.

Sixty-one athletes took part in the qualifying round of the competition, from which 50 athletes advanced to the two competition rounds. Swiss athlete Simon Ammann had the longest jumps in both competition rounds, winning the gold medal. The silver medal was won by Polish jumper Adam Małysz who had the third best results in both the first and second competition rounds. German jumper Michael Uhrmann was in second place following the first jump, but did poorly on his second jump and ended up fifth in the overall standings. Gregor Schlierenzauer of Austria moved up from seventh place to win the bronze medal after jumping a full 5 meters (16 ft) longer on his second attempt.

Background[edit]

The men's normal hill individual ski jumping competition for the 2010 Winter Olympics was held on 12 and 13 February 2010 at Whistler Olympic Park in Whistler, British Columbia.[1] It was the first medal event of the 2010 Games.[2]

The ski jumps at Whistler Olympic Park in warmer weather

A normal hill in ski jumping is defined as a jump in which the width of the hill ranges from 85 meters (279 ft) to 109 meters (358 ft). Skiers ski down a sloped ramp, which then turns flat into a takeoff jump, and complete their jump on a landing slope. The rules of international ski jumping competitions, set by the governing body for ski jumping, the Fédération Internationale de Ski, award points based on two factors: distance and judge's score. Distance is measured from the edge of the takeoff ramp to the point where the jumper first touches the landing slope. The three judges are able to award up to 20 points each, for a total of 60 points. The judge's scores are based on a variety of factors including the timing of the takeoff, the skier's ability to carry out the movements involved in the jump, and their stability in the air.[3]

The field[edit]

Allocation of slots in the Olympic ski jumping competition was based upon the World Ranking List (WRL) consisting of Ski Jumping World Cup and Grand Prix points, followed by Continental Cup Standings from the 2008-09 and 2009-10 Ski Jumping World Cup, with no nation being allowed more than five skiers.[4]

Norway's Lars Bystøl was the defending Olympic champion on the normal hill, but he retired after the 2007-08 season and therefore did not participate in the 2010 Games.[5] However, The 2006 large hill gold medalist, Austrian Thomas Morgenstern was present. Morgenstern had won the last scheduled normal hill event of the World Cup (on 14 December 2007 in Villach, Austria), and was expected to be among the strongest competitors in the event.[6][7] The last World Cup event in this discipline took place on 8 March 2009 at Lahti, Finland (though it was originally scheduled to be a large hill event) and was won by Gregor Schlierenzauer of Austria.[8] Although a relative newcomer to the sport, having only started competing in 2005-06, Schlierenzauer entered the competition with thirty-five World Cup victories under his belt.

Other competitors expected to finish strongly included Poland's Adam Małysz and Finland's Janne Ahonen, the latter of whom had come out of retirement in hopes of winning an Olympic medal. Simon Ammann, who had won gold medals in both normal and large hill competitions at the 2002 Winter Olympics but failed to medal in 2006, was expected to be a strong competitor as well.[7] Wolfgang Loitzl of Austria was the defending world champion.[9]

Qualifying[edit]

The qualifying round for the men's normal hill individual event took place on 12 February with a trial qualification at 09:00 PST and a qualification round at 10:00 PST the same day.[1] Sixty-one athletes participated in the qualification round, with ten pre-qualified, including all four athletes from Austria.[10] The forty athletes with the highest scores advanced to the medal round on 13 February, joining the ten pre-qualified jumpers.[11]

Roberto Dellasega of Italy was disqualified, and therefore excluded from any opportunity to advance. Norway's Anders Jacobsen did not show, but because he was pre-qualified he advanced to the competition round anyway. The top finisher in the qualifying round was Michael Uhrmann of Germany. His countryman Michael Neumayer had the second-longest jump but placed third to Czech jumper Jakub Janda because of Janda's higher judge's score. All four jumpers from the host country of Canada failed to qualify.[11]

Competition Rounds[edit]

The final competition, consisting of two jumps, took place on 13 February. The top thirty jumpers after the first jump qualified for the second jump. The combined total points over the two jumps was used to determine the final ranking. A practice round took place at 08:30 PST, with the first and second rounds of the event taking place at 09:45 PST and 10:45 PST respectively.[1]

Simon Ammann of Switzerland landed the longest distance in the first jump, 105 meters.[2][10] Following the first jump, Michael Uhrmann of Germany was the second-placed jumper, followed by Adam Małysz of Poland.[2] Austrian jumper Thomas Morgenstern was just outside of the medal positions in fourth place, whereas his countryman Gregor Schlierenzauer, was 7.5 points behind and in seventh place.[12] Harri Olli of Finland had a 97.5 meters jump with 116.0 points, and would have been eligible to jump in the final round, but was disqualified.[10]

In the second jump, Ammann again landed the longest jump, reaching a distance of 108 meters. After Ammann landed the jump, he immediately began pumping his arms in the air, confident that he had secured the gold medal.[2] Uhrmann, second after the first round, was one of the few competitors who had a shorter jump in the final round, placing tenth in the final round and fifth overall.[10] Among the jumpers who surpassed him was Adam Małysz, who again took third place in the final round and finished in second overall, winning the silver medal.[2] The bronze was won by Gregor Schlierenzauer, whose significantly better performance in the final round netted him second place for the round and third overall. Schlierenzauer's second jump was a full five meters longer than his first, the single largest improvement between the two rounds by any competitor.[10] Uhrmann's fifth-place finish was the top result by an athlete not pre-qualified for the competition round.[10]

Results[edit]

Qualifying[edit]

Rank Bib Name Country Distance (m) Distance Points Judges Points Total Notes
1 51 Michael Uhrmann  Germany 106.0 82.0 56.5 138.5 Q
2 44 Jakub Janda  Czech Republic 105.0 80.0 55.5 135.5 Q
3 45 Michael Neumayer  Germany 105.5 81.0 54.0 135.0 Q
4 43 Antonín Hájek  Czech Republic 105.0 80.0 54.5 134.5 Q
5 49 Daiki Ito  Japan 104.5 79.0 55.5 134.5 Q
6 46 Noriaki Kasai  Japan 105.5 81.0 52.5 133.5 Q
7 48 Harri Olli  Finland 105.0 80.0 53.5 133.5 Q
8 24 Janne Happonen  Finland 104.5 79.0 54.0 133.0 Q
9 40 Martin Schmitt  Germany 103.5 77.0 55.5 132.5 Q
10 41 Tom Hilde  Norway 103.5 77.0 55.0 132.0 Q
11 35 Kalle Keituri  Finland 103.0 76.0 54.0 130.0 Q
12 42 Kamil Stoch  Poland 103.0 76.0 51.5 127.5 Q
13 29 Peter Prevc  Slovenia 101.5 73.0 54.0 127.0 Q
13 47 Emmanuel Chedal  France 102.0 74.0 53.0 127.0 Q
15 34 Krzysztof Mietus  Poland 101.5 73.0 53.5 126.5 Q
15 38 Jernej Damjan  Slovenia 102.5 75.0 51.5 126.5 Q
17 22 Stefan Hula  Poland 101.5 73.0 52.5 125.5 Q
18 23 Vincent Descombes Sevoie  France 100.5 71.0 52.5 123.5 Q
18 25 Roman Koudelka  Czech Republic 100.0 70.0 53.5 123.5 Q
18 50 Pascal Bodmer  Germany 100.5 71.0 52.5 123.5 Q
21 33 Anders Bardal  Norway 99.5 69.0 53.5 122.5 Q
22 17 Kim Hyun-Ki  South Korea 99.0 68.0 53.5 121.5 Q
23 5 Volodymyr Boshchuk  Ukraine 99.0 68.0 52.5 120.5 Q
23 37 Andreas Kuettel  Switzerland 99.0 68.0 52.5 120.5 Q
25 8 David Lazzaroni  France 97.5 65.0 52.5 117.5 Q
26 26 Denis Kornilov  Russia 97.5 65.0 52.0 117.0 Q
27 27 Primoz Pikl  Slovenia 97.5 65.0 51.5 116.5 Q
27 28 Pavel Karelin  Russia 97.5 65.0 51.5 116.5 Q
29 15 Alexey Korolev  Kazakhstan 97.0 64.0 52.0 116.0 Q
30 7 Peter Frenette  United States 97.0 64.0 51.0 115.0 Q
31 18 Nikolay Karpenko  Kazakhstan 97.0 64.0 50.5 114.5 Q
32 30 Andrea Morassi  Italy 96.5 63.0 51.0 114.0 Q
33 20 Dimitry Ipatov  Russia 96.0 62.0 51.5 113.5 Q
33 31 Taku Takeuchi  Japan 96.0 62.0 51.5 113.5 Q
35 13 Nicholas Alexander  United States 96.0 62.0 51.0 113.0 Q
35 36 Sebastian Colloredo  Italy 96.0 62.0 51.0 113.0 Q
37 21 Vitaliy Shumbarets  Ukraine 95.5 61.0 51.0 112.0 Q
37 32 Lukáš Hlava  Czech Republic 95.5 61.0 51.0 112.0 Q
39 39 Shōhei Tochimoto  Japan 95.0 60.0 51.0 111.0 Q
40 2 Anders Johnson  United States 93.5 57.0 51.5 108.5 Q
40 14 Choi Heung-Chul  South Korea 93.5 57.0 51.5 108.5 Q
42 4 Tomas Zmoray  Slovakia 94.0 58.0 49.5 107.5
43 10 Choi Yong-Jik  South Korea 93.5 57.0 50.0 107.0
44 9 MacKenzie Boyd-Clowes  Canada 92.5 55.0 50.0 105.0
45 19 Ilya Rosliakov  Russia 92.0 54.0 50.5 104.5
46 6 Trevor Morrice  Canada 92.0 54.0 49.5 103.5
47 3 Stefan Read  Canada 91.5 53.0 50.0 103.0
48 12 Oleksandr Lazarovych  Ukraine 90.5 51.0 49.0 100.0
49 1 Eric Mitchell  Canada 89.0 48.0 50.5 98.5
50 11 Alexandre Mabboux  France 89.0 48.0 49.5 97.5
* 52 Robert Kranjec  Slovenia 102.0 74.0 N/A N/A Q, 1[›]
* 53 Bjørn Einar Romøren  Norway 97.5 65.0 N/A N/A Q, 1[›]
* 54 Anders Jacobsen  Norway N/A N/A N/A N/A Q, 1[›]
* 55 Janne Ahonen  Finland 102.0 74.0 N/A N/A Q, 1[›]
* 56 Adam Małysz  Poland 105.0 81.0 N/A N/A Q, 1[›]
* 57 Wolfgang Loitzl  Austria 103.5 77.0 N/A N/A Q, 1[›]
* 58 Andreas Kofler  Austria 105.0 80.0 N/A N/A Q, 1[›]
* 59 Thomas Morgenstern  Austria 105.5 81.0 N/A N/A Q, 1[›]
* 60 Gregor Schlierenzauer  Austria 107.0 84.0 N/A N/A Q, 1[›]
* 61 Simon Ammann  Switzerland 103.0 76.0 N/A N/A Q, 1[›]
16 Roberto Dellasega  Italy 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 DSQ

^ 1: These skiers were pre-qualified; they did perform jumps in the qualification round, but were not ranked with the non-pre-qualified jumpers.

Final[edit]

Rank Bib Name Country Round 1
Distance (m)
Round 1
Points
Round 1
Rank
Final Round
Distance (m)
Final Round
Points
Final Round
Rank
Total Points
1st, gold medalist(s) 51 Simon Ammann  Switzerland 105.0 135.5 1 108.0 141.0 1 276.5
2nd, silver medalist(s) 46 Adam Małysz  Poland 103.5 132.5 3 105.0 137.0 3 269.5
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 50 Gregor Schlierenzauer  Austria 101.5 128.0 7 106.5 140.0 2 268.0
4 45 Janne Ahonen  Finland 102.0 129.5 5 104.0 133.5 5 263.0
5 41 Michael Uhrmann  Germany 103.5 133.0 2 102.0 129.5 10 262.5
6 42 Robert Kranjec  Slovenia 102.0 129.0 6 102.5 130.5 8 259.5
7 19 Peter Prevc  Slovenia 100.0 124.0 13 104.5 135.0 4 259.0
8 49 Thomas Morgenstern  Austria 102.0 130.0 4 101.5 128.5 11 258.5
9 44 Anders Jacobsen  Norway 99.5 123.5 15 104.0 133.5 5 257.0
10 30 Martin Schmitt  Germany 99.5 123.0 16 103.5 133.0 7 256.0
11 47 Wolfgang Loitzl  Austria 100.0 124.5 12 102.5 130.5 8 255.0
12 31 Tom Hilde  Norway 100.0 124.0 13 101.5 128.0 12 252.0
12 15 Roman Koudelka  Czech Republic 101.5 127.0 9 100.5 125.0 13 252.0
14 34 Jakub Janda  Czech Republic 101.0 127.5 8 99.5 123.0 18 250.5
15 39 Daiki Ito  Japan 100.5 125.0 10 100.0 124.5 14 249.5
16 35 Michael Neumayer  Germany 101.0 125.0 10 99.5 122.0 19 247.0
17 36 Noriaki Kasai  Japan 99.0 120.5 19 100.5 124.0 15 244.5
18 23 Anders Bardal  Norway 98.0 118.5 22 100.0 124.0 15 242.5
19 48 Andreas Kofler  Austria 98.0 121.0 17 98.5 120.5 21 241.5
19 14 Janne Happonen  Finland 97.5 117.5 25 100.0 124.0 15 241.5
21 33 Antonin Hajek  Czech Republic 98.5 121.0 17 98.0 118.5 22 239.5
22 25 Kalle Keituri  Finland 97.0 116.0 27 99.5 122.0 19 238.0
23 43 Bjørn Einar Romøren  Norway 98.5 120.5 19 96.0 114.5 27 235.0
24 37 Emmanuel Chedal  France 99.0 120.0 21 96.5 114.5 27 234.5
24 17 Primoz Pikl  Slovenia 97.5 117.5 25 97.5 117.0 23 234.5
26 16 Denis Kornilov  Russia 98.0 118.5 22 96.5 114.0 29 232.5
27 32 Kamil Stoch  Poland 98.5 118.5 22 96.5 113.5 30 232.0
28 13 Vincent Descombes Sevoie  France 96.0 113.5 29 97.0 116.5 24 230.0
29 26 Sebastian Colloredo  Italy 96.0 114.0 28 96.5 115.0 26 229.0
29 9 Nikolay Karpenko  Kazakhstan 96.0 113.0 30 97.0 116.0 25 229.0
31 40 Pascal Bodmer  Germany 95.5 112.5 31 112.5
31 12 Stefan Hula  Poland 95.0 112.5 31 112.5
33 18 Pavel Karelin  Russia 95.0 111.5 33 111.5
34 21 Taku Takeuchi  Japan 94.5 110.5 34 110.5
35 27 Andreas Küttel  Switzerland 94.0 110.0 35 110.0
36 24 Krzysztof Mietus  Poland 94.0 109.0 36 109.0
37 29 Shōhei Tochimoto  Japan 93.5 108.5 37 108.5
38 28 Jernej Damjan  Slovenia 93.5 108.0 38 108.0
38 22 Lukas Hlava  Czech Republic 94.0 108.0 38 108.0
40 8 Kim Hyun-Ki  South Korea 93.0 107.0 30 107.0
41 5 Nicholas Alexander  United States 93.5 106.5 41 106.5
41 3 Peter Frenette  United States 93.0 106.5 41 106.5
43 20 Andrea Morassi  Italy 92.5 106.0 43 106.0
44 7 Alexey Korolev  Kazakhstan 93.0 105.0 44 105.0
45 11 Vitaliy Shumbarets  Ukraine 92.0 104.5 45 104.5
46 10 Dimitry Ipatov  Russia 91.0 102.5 46 102.5
47 4 David Lazzaroni  France 90.5 101.0 47 101.0
48 6 Choi Heung-Chul  South Korea 87.5 95.0 48 95.0
49 1 Anders Johnson  United States 86.5 92.5 49 92.5
50 2 Volodymyr Boshchuk  Ukraine 87.5 91.5 50 91.5
38 Harri Olli  Finland DSQ

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c 2010 Winter Olympic ski jumping schedule. Archived 2010-05-14 at the Wayback Machine. - accessed 5 November 2009.
  2. ^ a b c d e Karen, Mattias (2010-02-13). "Ammann Wins 1st Gold Medal of Vancouver Olympics". Associated Press. ABC News. Retrieved 2010-02-13. 
  3. ^ "Ski Jumping" (pdf). International Ski Competition Rules. Fédération Internationale de Ski. 2008. Retrieved 2010-02-14. 
  4. ^ "QUALIFICATION SYSTEMS FOR XXI OLYMPIC WINTER GAMES, VANCOUVER 2010" (PDF). FIS. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2009-06-17. Retrieved 2010-03-03. 
  5. ^ "Biography - Lars Bystoel". Fédération Internationale de Ski. Retrieved 2010-02-14. 
  6. ^ "Results". 2007 FIS World Cup event in Villach, Austria. Fédération Internationale de Ski. 2007-12-14. Retrieved 2010-02-14. 
  7. ^ a b "Ski Jumping: Ammann magic as Swiss land gold again". Agence France-Presse. Vancouver 2010. 2010-02-13. Retrieved 2010-02-14. 
  8. ^ "Results". 2009 FIS World Cup event in Lahti, Finland. Fédération Internationale de Ski. 2009-08-03. Retrieved 2010-02-14. 
  9. ^ "Results". 2009 FIS Nordic World Ski Championships. Fédération Internationale de Ski. 2009-02-21. Retrieved 2010-02-14. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f "NH Individual Final Round". Ski Jumping. Vancouver 2010. 2010-02-13. Archived from the original on 2010-02-13. Retrieved 2010-02-13. 
  11. ^ a b "NH Individual - Qualification". Ski Jumping. Vancouver 2010. 2010-02-13. Archived from the original on 2010-05-13. Retrieved 2010-02-14. 
  12. ^ "NH Individual Round 1". Ski Jumping. 2010 Winter Olympics. 2010-02-13. Retrieved 2010-02-13. 

External links[edit]