Skill India

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Skill India
Country India
Prime Minister(s) Narendra Modi
Ministry Skill Development and Entrepreneurship
Key people Dharmendra Pradhan
Launched 15 July 2015; 3 years ago (2015-07-15)
Status Active
Website www.skilldevelopment.gov.in/pmkvy.html
msde.gov.in/index.html

Skill India is a campaign launched by Prime Minister Narendra Damodardas Modi on 15 July 2015 which aim to train over 40 crore people in India in different skills by 2022. It includes various initiatives of the government like "National Skill Development Mission", "National Policy for Skill Development and Entrepreneurship, 2015", "Pradhan Mantri Kaushal Vikas Yojana (PMKVY)" and the "Skill Loan scheme".

History[edit]

Skill India campaign was launched by Prime Minister Narendra Modi on 15 July 2015 to train over 40 crore people in India in different skills by 2022.[1]

Initiatives[edit]

Various initiatives under this campaign are:[2]

  • National Skill Development Mission
  • National Policy for Skill Development and Entrepreneurship, 2015
  • Pradhan Mantri Kaushal Vikas Yojana (PMKVY)
  • Skill Loan scheme
  • Rural India Skill

Partnership concept[edit]

UK has entered into a partnership with India under skill India programme. Virtual partnerships will be initiated at the school level to enable young people of these country to experience the school system of the other country and develop an understanding of the culture, traditions and social and family systems. A commitment to achieve mutual recognition of UK and Indian qualifications was made.[3]

Skill India Developments[edit]

Oracle on 12 February 2016 announced that it will build a new 2.8 million sq. ft. campus in Bengaluru will be Oracle's largest outside of its headquarters in Redwood Shores, California.[4] Oracle Academy will launch an initiative to train more than half-a-million students each year to develop computer science skills by expanding its partnerships to 2,700 institutions in India from 1,700 at present.[4]

Japan's private sector is to set up six institutes of manufacturing to train 30,000 people over 10 years in Japanese style manufacturing skills and practices, primarily in the rural areas. Japan-India Institute of Manufacturing (JIM) and Japanese Endowed Courses (JEC) in engineering colleges designated by Japanese companies in India in cooperation between the public and private sectors would be established for this purpose. The first three institutes would be set up in Gujarat, Karnataka and Rajasthan in the summer of 2017.[5]

In the budget of fiscal year 2017 - 18 the government of India has decided to set aside Rs. 17,000 crore, the highest ever allocation to this sector, in order to boost the Skill India Mission. At least ten million Indian youth enter the country’s workforce each year, but the employment creation in India has not been able to absorb this influx, making increasing unemployment a severe problem. Through this allocation the government aims at generating employment and providing livelihood to the millions of young Indians who enter the work force every year.

The government has invested Rs. 4000 crore in the launch of SANKALP (Skill Acquisition and Knowledge Awareness for Livelihood Promotion Programme), another big initiative under the Skill India Mission. Through this it aims at providing market relevant training to 350 million young Indians. Apart from this, the government would set up 100 India International Skills Centres that will conduct advanced courses in foreign languages to help youngsters prepare for overseas jobs.[6]

Performance[edit]

As of 15 February 2016, the "Indian Leather Development Programme" trained 51,216 youth in a span of 100 days and it plans to train 1,44,000 young persons annually. Four new branches of "Footwear Design & Development Institute" — at Haydrabaad, Patna, Banur (Punjab) and Ankleshwar (Gujarat) — are being set up to improve training infrastructure. The industry is undergoing acute skill shortage and most of the people trained are being absorbed by the industry.[7]

References[edit]

External links[edit]