Skippy Baxter

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Skippy Baxter
Personal information
Full name Lloyd Valdemar Baxter
Country represented  United States
Born Lloyd Valdemar Baxter
(1919-12-06)December 6, 1919
Saskatchewan, Canada
Died December 18, 2012(2012-12-18) (aged 93)
United States
Former partner Hedy Stenuf
Sonja Henie

Lloyd Valdemar Baxter (December 6, 1919 – December 18, 2012[1]), better known as Skippy Baxter,[2] was an American figure skater. Born in Saskatchewan, Canada, his family moved to Oakland, California when he was 1 year of age.[3] Skippy started his skating career as a speed skater. Often winning awards as a youth Speed skater in Oakland, California.[citation needed] Then later, he won two medals at the 1940 United States Figure Skating Championships: a bronze in men's singles and a silver in pair skating with Hedy Stenuf. Baxter went on to skate professionally with the Ice Capades, working with Sonja Henie in her shows.[citation needed]

Skippy and his brother Meryl Baxter owned an ice rink in Santa Rosa, California on Summerfield Road, where the famous cartoonist Charles Schulz would take his family for skating lessons. It was there that Charles and Skippy Baxter formed a close friendship that lasted until the death of Charles Schulz. Baxter choreographed a segment for the 1969 animated film A Boy Named Charlie Brown, in which Snoopy skates.

He later coached figure skating in Northern California at the Redwood Empire Ice Arena in Santa Rosa, California. Charles Schulz built the rink while Skippy and his brother Meryl Baxter helped run and operate the rink.[4] Skippy was inducted into the United States Figure Skating Hall of Fame in 2003.[5]

Results[edit]

(men's singles)

Event 1940
U.S. Championships 3rd

(pairs with Stenuf)

Event 1940
U.S. Championships 2nd

References[edit]

  1. ^ "World class skater, gracious instructor Skippy Baxter dies at 93". pressdemocrat.com. 2012-12-18. Retrieved 2012-12-18. 
  2. ^ "Skates to Rebuild Leg, Baxter Now Ice Star". The Milwaukee Journal. September 21, 1942. Retrieved 14 February 2010. 
  3. ^ "U.S. HALL OF FAME PRESENTS CLASS OF 2003". usfigureskating.org. Retrieved 21 December 2012. 
  4. ^ Smith, Chris (November 23, 2009). "Skippy Baxter still skating 80 years on". The Press Democrat. Retrieved February 14, 2010. 
  5. ^ "U.S. Hall of Fame Presents Class of 2003". U.S. Figure Skating. Retrieved 14 February 2010.