SkyRider X2R

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A 1/4th scale SkyRider body prototype

The SkyRider X2R is a flying car design developed by MACRO Industries, Inc. The SkyRider incorporates tough, lightweight composites for reduced structural weight, it utilizes four-ducted fans with wings to generate lift and maintain flight and uses control systems and onboard computers to generate a travel path to reach a destination given by voice commands.[1][2]

While still in a prototype phase, the SkyRider is estimated to cost between $500,000 to $1 million, although price is expected to drop to $50,000 if it reaches mass production.[3] In the early 2000s, MACRO Industries planned but failed to have an operational prototype by 2005.[4] In 2010, MACRO Industries designed and proposed a militarized version of its SkyRider for the DARPA Transformer program.This has not been built as of July 2017[5][6]

Specifications[edit]

General characteristics[edit]

  • Length: 4.3 m (14 ft)
  • Width: 3.7 m (12 ft)
  • Engines: 1 @ 520 kW (700 hp)
  • Electric drive
  • Ducted fans: 4
  • Person capacity: 2 @ 90 kg (200 lb)
  • Load capacity: 140 kg (300 lb)
  • Fuel capacity: 380 l or 83 imp gal or 100 US gal
  • Range: (50power) 1,500 km or 920 mi or 800 nmi
  • Conventional takeoff roll: 500 ft (150 m)
  • VTOL take off roll: 0 ft (0 m)
  • Noise level: 40 dBA @ 100 ft (30 m)

Theoretical Performance[edit]

  • Cruise speed: (75power) 463 km/h (288 mph)
  • Maximum speed: 604 km/h (375 mph)
  • Rate of climb: 4,000 ft (1,200 m) per minute
  • Service ceiling: 25,000 ft (7,600 m)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Electric Motors Lift SkyRider". Popular Mechanics. February 2001. Retrieved 3 January 2015. 
  2. ^ "Future Flyers: Pushing Forward for Personal Aircraft". Space.com. August 18, 2004. Retrieved 3 January 2015. 
  3. ^ "Up, Up, and Away! Seven Modern Flying Car Designs". The Wall Street Journal. 4 May 2009. Retrieved 2 January 2015. 
  4. ^ "Get Ready to Meet George Jetson". Fox News. 30 November 2001. Retrieved 3 January 2015. 
  5. ^ But will it Fly? Macro sets its sights on real Transformer Retrieved January 3, 2015.
  6. ^ "Huntsville-based Macro Industries creating 'Transformer' for military". Alabama Local News. 21 July 2010. Retrieved 3 January 2015. 

External links[edit]