Slavic studies

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Slavic studies (North America), Slavonic studies (Britain and Ireland) or Slavistics (borrowed from Russian славистика or Polish slawistyka) is the academic field of area studies concerned with Slavic areas, Slavic languages, literature, history, and culture. Originally, a Slavist (from Russian славист or Polish slawista) or Slavicist was primarily a linguist or philologist researching Slavistics, a Slavic (AmE) or Slavonic (BrE) scholar. Increasingly historians and other humanists and social scientists who study Slavic area cultures and societies have been included[by whom?] in this rubric.

History[edit]

Slavistics emerged in late 18th and early 19th century, simultaneously with national revivals among various nations of Slavic origins and with ideological attempts to establish a common sense of Slavic community, exemplified by the Pan-Slavist movement. Among the first scholars to use the term was Josef Dobrovský (1753-1829).

The history of Slavic studies is generally divided[by whom?] into three periods. Until 1876 the early Slavists concentrated on documentation and printing of monuments of Slavic languages, among them the first texts written in national languages. At this time the majority of Slavic languages received their first modern dictionaries, grammars and compendia. The second period, ending with World War I, featured the rapid development of Slavic philology and linguistics, most notably outside of Slavic countries themselves, in the circle formed around August Schleicher (1821-1868) and around August Leskien (1840-1916) at the University of Leipzig.

After World War I Slavic studies scholars focused on dialectology, while the science continued to develop in countries with large populations having Slavic origins. After World War II there developed centres of Slavic studies, and much greater expansion into other humanities and social science disciplines in various universities around the world. Indeed, partly due to the political concerns in Western European and the United States about the Slavic world nurtured by the Cold War, Slavic studies flourished in the years from World War II into the 1990s and remain[when?] strong (though university enrollments in Slavic languages have declined since the 1990s).

Slavic countries and areas of interest[edit]

Notable people[edit]

Historical
Contemporary

Journals and book series[edit]

Conferences[edit]

Institutes and schools[edit]

Academic
University
Other

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Lunt, Horace G. (1992). "Notes on Nationalist Attitudes in Slavic Studies". Canadian Slavonic Papers. 34 (4): 459–470. 
  • Coleman, Arthur P. "Slavonic Studies in the United States, 1918-1938." The Slavonic and East European Review 17.50 (1939): 372-388.
  • Rosenbaum, Maurice W. "Slavonic Studies in America." The Journal of Higher Education 14.1 (1943): 9-58.
  • Simmons, John Simon Gabriel. Slavonic Studies at Oxford: The Proposed Slavonic Chair at the Taylor Institution in 1844. Clarendon Press, 1952.
  • Kerner, Robert J. "Slavonic studies in America." The Slavonic Review (1924): 243-258.
  • Galton, Dorothy. "Sir Bernard Pares and Slavonic Studies in London University, 1919-39." The Slavonic and East European Review (1968): 481-491.
  • Manning, Clarence A. "Slavonic Studies in the United States." The Modern Language Journal 19.6 (1935): 425-432.
  • Eisenmann, Louis. "Slavonic studies in France." The Slavonic Review (1922): 295-305.
  • Cronia, Arturo. "Slavonic studies in Italy." The Slavonic and East European Review (1947): 197-208.
  • Seton-Watson, Robert W. "The Origins of the School of Slavonic Studies." The Slavonic and East European Review 17.50 (1939): 360-371.
  • Stone, Gerald. The History of Slavonic Studies in Great Britain: Until the Second World War. Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 1985.
  • Stone, Gerald. Slavonic studies at Oxford: A brief history. Oxford University, 2005.
  • Rose, William J. "Slavonic Studies in the University of British Columbia." The Slavonic and East European Review 37.88 (1958): 246-253.
  • Mazon, André. "Slavonic studies in France." The Slavonic and East European Review 25.64 (1946): 206-213.
  • St Clair-Sobell, James. "Slavonic Studies in Canadian Universities." (1954).
  • Vavřínek, V. "Current State and Further Perspectives of Slavonic Studies in Central Europe." Proceedings of the International Workshop, Prague 11th-12th November. 1998.
  • Brozek, Josef. "Slavic Studies in America." The Journal of Higher Education 14.6 (1943): 293-342.
  • Baran, Henryk, et al. Evaluation of Education and Research in Slavonic and Baltic Studies. Edita, 2000.
  • Vesterholt, Ole. Tradition and individuality: A study in Slavonic oral epic poetry. Vol. 2. Rosenkilde and Bagger, 1973.
  • Roberts, Ian W. History of the School of Slavonic and East European Studies: 1915-1990. London: School of Slavonic and East European Studies, 1991.
  • Maslenikov, Oleg A. "Slavic Studies in America, 1939-1946." The Slavonic and East European Review 25.65 (1947): 528-537.
  • Buyniak, Victor O. "Slavic Studies in Canada: An Historical Survey." Canadian Slavonic Papers 9.1 (1967): 3-23.
  • Unbegaun, Boris. "Slavonic studies in France." The Slavonic and East European Review 7.21 (1929): 694-698.
  • Pospíšil, Ivo, Michael Moser, and Stefan Newerkla. Litteraria Humanitas XIII. Austrian, Czech and Slovak Slavonic Studies in Their Central European Context. 2005.
  • Špinka, Matthew. "Slavonic Studies in Church History." The Slavonic Review 5.13 (1926): 114-127.
  • Lo Gatto, Ettore. "Slavonic Studies in Italy." The Slavonic Review 6.16 (1927): 44-58.
  • Kiparsky, Valentin. "Comparative and historical Slavistics." Current Trends in Linguistics I (The Hague: Mouton and Co) (1963).
  • Birgegård, Ulla. "The History of Slavistics in Sweden." (2005): 571.
  • Žeňuch, P. "Slovenská slavistika včera a dnes [Slovak Slavistics: Past and Present]." Bratislava: Slovak Committee of Slavists and Ján Stanislav Institute of Slavistics of the Slovak Academy of Sciences (2012).
  • Folejewski, Zbigniew. "Slavistics in Canada." Beiträge zur Geschichte der Slawistik in Nichtslawischen Ländern (1985): 529-538.
  • Keller, Howard H. "New Contents Slavistics: A Journal Indexing Service." Slavic and East European Journal (1983): 374-378.
  • Sgall, Petr. "Slavistics and the history of topic–focus studies." Investigations into Formal Slavic Linguistics. Contributions of the Fourth European Conference on Formal Description of Slavic Languages–FDSL IV. Frankfurt am Main–Berlin–Bern–Bruxelles–New York–Oxford–Wien: Peter Lang. 2003.
  • Hill, Ron. "Social Science,'Slavistics' and Post-Soviet Studies." Rethinking the Soviet Collapse: Sovietology, the Death of Communism and the New Russia (1998): 203.
  • Folejewski, Zbigniew. "Slavistics and World Literature1." The Modern Language Journal 43.4 (1959): 194-194.
  • ZYLA, WT. POSTWAR SLAVISTICS IN CANADA. Diss. MA thesis eva1uated (1961) by JBR for the University of Manitoba, 1961.
  • Sziklay, L. "Die Anfänge der ungarischen Slawistik.(Die slawischen Beziehungen des ungarischen Vereins von Prešov).[Počiatky maďarskej slavistiky.(Slovanské vzťahy maďarského spolku v Prešove).][The beginning of Hungarian Slavistics.(The Slav relations of the Hungarian society in Prešov).]." Zeitschrift fiir Slawistik IV (Berlin 1959) p: 647-673.
  • Horák, E. "Súčasný stav slovenskej jazykovednej slavistiky [Present State of Slovak Linguistic Slavistics]." Slavica Slovaca 25 (1990): 64.
  • Doruľa, J. "Potreba interdisciplinárneho výskumu v jazykovednej slavistike [The Need for Interdisciplinary Research in Linguistic Slavistics]." Slovenský národopis 38 (1990): 378-380.
  • MATOVCIK, A. "SLAVISTICS IN GERMANY FROM ITS BEGINNINGS TO 1945-A BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY-GERMAN-EICHLER, E." (1994): 159-160.
  • LEHFELDT, W. "REFLECTIONS ON THE CURRENT STATE OF SLAVISTICS IN GERMANY." WELT DER SLAVEN-HALBJAHRESSCHRIFT FUR SLAVISTIK 40.1 (1995): 187-194.
  • REHDER, P. "SLAVISTICS-SPECIAL SUBJECTS, ORGANIZATIONAL FORMS AND INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES." WELT DER SLAVEN-HALBJAHRESSCHRIFT FUR SLAVISTIK 40.1 (1995): 172-174.
  • BIELFELDT, HH, and W. ZEIL. "RESEARCH IN EAST-GERMANY ON THE HISTORY OF SLAVISTICS." (1984): 777-781.
  • Holý, Dušan, and Volodymyr Hošovskyj. "U pramenů lidové hudby Slovanů; studie z hudební slavistiky [At the Sources of Slavic Folk Music; Studies in Musical Slavistics]." (1977): 113-114.
  • Doruľa, Ján. "Institutionalisation of Slovak Slavistics." Human Affairs 23.2 (2013): 276-288.
  • ZEIL, L. "THE DEVELOPMENT OF SLAVISTICS AT THE BERLIN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES (1700-1945)." ZEITSCHRIFT FUR SLAWISTIK 30.3 (1985): 402-429.
  • BRANG, P. "OBSERVATIONS ON THE HISTORY OF SLAVISTICS IN SWITZERLAND." ZEITSCHRIFT FUR SLAWISTIK 27.1 (1982): 38-42.
  • MATULA, V. "THE CONTRIBUTION OF SOVIET SLAVISTICS AND BALKANISTICS IN THE STUDY OF THE PRINCIPLES OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE NATIONS OF CENTRAL AND SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE IN THE PERIOD OF THE TRANSITION FROM FEUDALISM TO CAPITALISM." HISTORICKY CASOPIS 31.4 (1983): 614-626.
  • ITO, T. "SLAVISTICS AND EAST EUROPEAN STUDIES IN JAPAN. 1. HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENT." OSTEUROPA 33.5 (1983): 400-417.
  • MCMILLIN, A. "CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE HISTORY OF SLAVISTICS IN NON-SLAVIC COUNTRIES-GERMAN-HAMM, J, WYTRZENS, G." (1987): 431-431.
  • ZEIL, W. "VASMER CONTRIBUTION TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF GERMAN SLAVISTICS AND THE IMPROVEMENT OF GERMAN-SLAVIC SCIENTIFIC RELATIONS 1921-1945." ZEITSCHRIFT FUR SLAWISTIK 31.5 (1986): 663-675.
  • IMPOSTI, G. "SLAVISTICS IN ITALY-50 YEARS OF RESEARCH (1940-1990)-ITALIAN-BROGIBERCOFF, G, DELLAGATA, G, MARCHESANI, P, PICCHIO, R." (1995): 650-652.
  • Žeňuch, Peter, and Katarína Žeňuchová. "Slovak Slavistics: Past and present. Interdisciplinary discourses of Slovak academic Slavistics." Human Affairs 23.2 (2013): 258-275.
  • Evans, R. J. W. "Bohemian Slavistics between the Enlightenment and the 1860s." (1998): 761-762.
  • Grübel, Rainer. "» Čto (ne) delat’«–» What is (not) to be done «? Why Standards and Norms are a Current Problem within Slavistics [Abstract]." JLT Articles 5.2 (2011).
  • Rzetelska-Feleszko, Ewa. "Institute of Slavistics Polish Academy of Sciences Warsaw." Language Minorities and Minority Languages: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Minority Languages, Gdańsk, 1-5 July, 1996. Wydawn. Uniwersytetu Gdańskiego, 1997.
  • DYAKOV, VA. "BASIC LINES OF DEVELOPMENT IN SLAVISTICS DURING THE INTER-WAR PERIOD." ZEITSCHRIFT FUR SLAWISTIK 27.1 (1982): 29-37.
  • POHRT, H. "CZECHOSLOVAKIAN SLAVISTICS IN THE YEARS 1918-1939-CZECH-KUDELKA, M, SIMICEK, Z, STASTNY, V." (1982): 166-166.
  • Brehmer, Bernhard, Schamma Schahadat, and Annette Werberger. "Perspectives on Slavistics III."
  • Yudin, Aleksey, and Pieter Plas. "Slavic ethnolinguistics and the study of lingual/cultural meaning: directions and perspectives." POS. Perspectives on Slavistics. 2004.
  • Jembrih, Alojzije. "Viennese slavistics before and in Hamm's time." Josip Hamm i njegovo djelo. Hrvatski studiji Sveučilišta u Zagrebu, 2007.
  • Sels, Lara, and Jeannine Vereecken. "Bibliography of Belgian Slavistics." Slavica Gandensia 35 (2008): 271-313.

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Library guides[edit]