Sloppy joe

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Sloppy Joe
Sloppy Joe "homemade".jpg
Sloppyjoemeat.jpg
Above: A homemade sloppy joe with coleslaw
Below: Sloppy joe meat being prepared
Alternative names Wimpies, yip yips, slushburgers[citation needed]
Course Main
Place of origin United States
Serving temperature Hot
Main ingredients Ground beef, onions, sweetened tomato sauce or ketchup, Worcestershire sauce, seasoning, hamburger bun
Variations Multiple
Cookbook: Sloppy Joe  Media: Sloppy Joe

A sloppy joe is a sandwich consisting of ground beef, onions, tomato sauce or ketchup, Worcestershire sauce, and other seasonings, served on a hamburger bun.[1] The dish originated in the United States during the early 20th century.

History[edit]

Early 20th century American cookbooks offer plenty of sloppy-joe type recipes, though they go by different titles: Toasted Deviled Hamburgers,[2] Chopped Meat Sandwiches,[3] Hamburg a la Creole,[4] Beef Mironton,[5] and Minced Beef Spanish Style.[6]

Marilyn Brown, Director of the Consumer Test Kitchen at H.J. Heinz in Pittsburgh, says their research at the Carnegie Library suggests that the sloppy joe began in a Sioux City, Iowa, cafe as a "loose meat sandwich" in 1930, the creation of a cook named Joe.[7]

References to sloppy joes as sandwiches begin by the 1940s. One example is a 1944 Coshocton Tribune ad under the heading "Good Things to Eat" says "Sloppy Joes' - 10c - Originated in Cuba - You'll ask for more - The Hamburg Shop" and elsewhere on the same page, "Hap is introducing that new sandwich at The Hamburg Shop - Sloppy Joes - 10c."[8]

The term sloppy Joe's had an earlier definition of any cheap restaurant or lunch counter serving cheap food quickly, since 1940[9] or a type of casual clothing.[10]

Food companies began producing packaged sloppy joe sauce, such as Manwich, by the 1960s.

Variations[edit]

Several variations of the sloppy joe exist in North America. In Quebec, Canada, sandwiches of stewed ground beef such as pain à la viande and pain fourré gumbo are usually served on hot dog buns. A similar sandwich, the "dynamite", exists in the area around Woonsocket, Rhode Island, and is distinguished by the use of onions, bell peppers, and sometimes celery.[11]

Stewed meat sandwiches are common in several other culinary traditions as well. The rou jia mo, from China's Shaanxi Province, consists of stewed pork, beef, or lamb on a steamed bun. Keema pav of Indian cuisine uses a pav bread roll filled with keema, a minced, stewed, curried meat.[12]

Ground turkey or textured vegetable protein may be used as a substitute for ground beef.

In some stores in northern New Jersey, an unrelated sandwich made with a combination of deli meat, such as turkey, roast beef or especially ham, with coleslaw, Russian dressing and Swiss cheese on three slices of rye bread is also known as a sloppy joe.[13]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ingram, Gaye G., Labensky, Sarah R., Labensky, Steven. Webster’s New World Dictionary of Culinary Arts 2nd Edition.
  2. ^ Good Housekeeping Cook Book, Katharine Fisher [1944] (p. 534),
  3. ^ Young America's Cook Book, Home Institute of the New York Herald Tribune [1940] (p. 36)
  4. ^ Prudence Penny's Cookbook, [1939] (p.67)
  5. ^ The New Butterick Cook Book, Flora Rose [1924] (p. 266)
  6. ^ Mrs. Rorer's New Cook Book, Sarah Tyson Rorer [1902] (p. 157)
  7. ^ The American Century Cookbook: The Most Popular Recipes of the 20th Century, Jean Anderson.
  8. ^ Coshocton Tribune (Coshocton, Ohio), Oct. 29, 1944, p. 11
  9. ^ Dictionary of American Slang, Wentworth & Flexner, 2nd supp. edition, p. 488
  10. ^ Advertisement, Pittsburgh Press. Oct. 8, 1940
  11. ^ Jonic, Flo (May 9, 2011). "Woonsocket's Dynamite Sandwich". Rhode Island Public Radio. Retrieved 2013-06-07. 
  12. ^ "Kheema Pav - Indian Sloppy Joes". 
  13. ^ "New Jersey Sloppy Joe". 

Further reading[edit]