Slovene Venezuelans

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Venezuelans of Slovene descent
Venezuelski Slovenci
Esloveno Venezolano
Total population
1,000 [1]
Regions with significant populations
Greater Caracas, Valencia, Maracay, Maracaibo and Acarigua
Languages
Slovene, Spanish
Religion
Catholic with a Lutheran minority
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History of Slovenia

Venezuelans of Slovene descent, also Slovene Venezuelans (Slovene: venezuelski Slovenci) number around 1,000.

History[edit]

The first Slovenians arrived in Venezuela between the two World Wars, although in a small number, estimated at about 50 people. After World War II small Slovenian community of about 500 members has been formed, which settled between 1947 and 1953, mostly from Primorska. This emigration was motivated by the dissatisfaction with the economic conditions and partly with the political conditions, and by the existing ties with the Slovenes in Venezuela. Based on different sources and testimonies, it is estimated that up to 1960 between 550 and 800 Slovenians arrived in Venezuela.[2]

Most of the Slovenes settled in Caracas and in smaller numbers in Valencia, Maracay, Maracaibo and Acarigua. In 1958 the Slovenian priest Janez Grilc arrived in Venezuela from Argentina, who proved to be an excellent organizer. That same year began the masses in Slovene language, also the pilgrimages with marked national qualities, they were followed the social and cultural meetings. In 1966, the association was formally founded in Caracas, Sv. Ciril in Metod ", whose events were between 100 and 150 people. They organize pilgrimages, during St. Nicholas Day and the commemoration of the independence of Slovenia. At that time, they formed the Asociación Eslovena (Slovenian Association) that continues active until the present, which propitiates an annual meeting in Valencia in which a pilgrimage is realized and a mass is officiated. Due to the small number of Slovenian residents, a cultural center of their own did not exist, so they participated in the events and celebrations of the Hogar Croata de Caracas (Croatian Club).

From April 1959 onwards the newspaper "Življenje - Vida" was published, with religious and informative themes.

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Trebše-Štolfa, Milica, ed., Klemenčič, Matjaž, resp. ed.: Slovensko izseljenstvo: zbornik ob 50-letnici Slovenske izseljenske matice. Ljubljana: Združenje Slovenska izseljenska matica, 2001.COBISS 115722752
  2. ^ Banko, Catalina. "A shelter in Venezuela: the immigrants from Hungary, Croatia, Slovenia, Romania and Bulgary". Tiempo y Espacio (in Spanish). SciELO. 26 (65). ISSN 1315-9496. Retrieved 23 January 2017.

External links[edit]