Slow living

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Slow living (sloh liv-ing: Proto-Germanic *slæwaz) is a lifestyle which encourages a slower approach to aspects of everyday life,[1] involving completing tasks at a leisurely pace.[2] The origins of this lifestyle are linked to the Italian slow food movement, which emphasised traditional food production techniques in response to the emerging popularity of fast food during the 1980s and 1990s. Slow living encompasses a wide variety of sub-categories such as slow money and slow cities,[3] which are proposed as solutions to the negative environmental consequences of capitalism and consumerism in alignment with the aims of the green movement.

The slow living movement also focuses on the idea that a fast-paced way of living is chaotic, whereas a slower pace encourages enjoyment of life, a deeper appreciation of sensory experiences, and the ability to 'live in the present moment'. However, slow living does not prevent the adoption of certain technologies such as mobile phones, the Internet, and access to goods and services.[4][5]

The acronym SLOW is commonly used to summarise the aims of the slow living lifestyle. The 'S' refers to sustainable, the 'L' refers to local, involving using materials and products that are produced locally, the 'O' refers to organic, meaning avoiding products that have been genetically engineered or mass-produced, and the 'W' refers to whole, meaning not processed.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Parkins, Wendy; Craig, Geoffrey (2006). Slow living. Oxford, UK: Berg. ISBN 978-1-84520-160-9.
  2. ^ Tam, Daisy (2008). "Slow journeys: What does it mean to go slow?". Food, Culture and Society. 11 (2): 207–218. doi:10.2752/175174408X317570. S2CID 144438405.
  3. ^ Tranter, Paul; Tolley, Rodney (2020), "The 'slow paradox': how speed steals our time", Slow Cities, Elsevier, pp. 97–125, doi:10.1016/b978-0-12-815316-1.00004-6, ISBN 9780128153161, S2CID 226401781, retrieved 2022-03-23
  4. ^ Steager, Tabitha (2009). "Slow living by wendy parkin and geoffrey craig". Food, Culture & Society. 12 (2): 241–243. doi:10.2752/175174409X400774. S2CID 178439297.
  5. ^ "What Is Slow Living, and Why Is Everyone Suddenly Using This Term?". Martha Stewart. December 13, 2019. Retrieved April 28, 2022.
  6. ^ Marie, Kate; Thomas, Christopher; Abbey, Kris, Mahony, Ananda (2009). Fast living, slow ageing: How to age less, look great, live longer, get more. Newton, NSW: Mileage Media.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)

Further reading[edit]