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slrn screenshoot
Stable release 1.0.2 / September 20, 2014; 12 months ago (2014-09-20)
Written in S-Lang
Operating system Cross-platform
Type News reader
License GNU General Public License

slrn is a console based news client for multiple operating systems, developed by John E. Davis and others. It was originally developed in 1994 for Unix-like operating systems and VMS, but is now available for many other operating systems, including Microsoft Windows. It supports scoring rules to highlight, sort or kill articles based on information from their header. It is customizable, allows free key-bindings and can be extended using the S-Lang macro language. Offline reading is possible by using either slrnpull (included with slrn) or a local newsserver (like leafnode or INN). slrn is free software available for Linux, FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD, OpenSolaris, OS/2, BeOS, VMS and Windows.

slrn was maintained by Thomas Schultz from 2000 to 2007, with the help of others who made contributions, but development is now again followed by the original author, John E. Davis. Current development focuses on better support for different character sets and tighter integration of the S-Lang language processor. Version 1.0.0 of slrn was released on December 21, 2012, 18 years after the first release. Latest release is 1.0.2 on September 20, 2014. Historically slrn was the starting point for many Usenet users.[1] slrn is still a compromise between features, resource usage and simplicity.[2]


slrn is fully controlled with the keyboard, and new messages are composed with an external text editor.

slrn may be used by security professionals or security conscious users because of its smaller attack surface, like Mutt, compared with other clients that ship with a web browser rendering engine or a JavaScript interpreter.[3]


The slrn name derives from the use of S-Lang and its function to read news.[4]

See also[edit]


  1. ^ "Introduction to Usenet News and the slrn Newsreader". 1995-01-20. Retrieved 2015-10-04. 
  2. ^ "Reviewed and rated: the best Linux newsreaders". 2009-03-16. Retrieved 2015-10-04. 
  3. ^ "Why Security Experts Are Using an Ancient Email Format in 2015". 2015-09-07. Retrieved 2015-10-04. 
  4. ^ Sery, Paul G. (1998). LINUX Network Toolkit. John Wiley & Sons. p. 533. ISBN 9780764531460. 

External links[edit]