Smith Hickenlooper

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Smith Hickenlooper
Smith Hickenlooper.JPG
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit
In office
December 17, 1928 – December 22, 1933
Appointed by Calvin Coolidge
Preceded by Maurice H. Donahue
Succeeded by Florence Ellinwood Allen
Judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of Ohio
In office
March 3, 1923 – January 9, 1927
Appointed by Warren G. Harding
Preceded by John Weld Peck
Succeeded by Robert Reasoner Nevin
Personal details
Born (1880-02-13)February 13, 1880
Cincinnati, Ohio
Died December 22, 1933(1933-12-22) (aged 53)
Cincinnati, Ohio
Resting place Spring Grove Cemetery
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Anna Bailey Wright
Alma mater University of Cincinnati
Harvard Law School

Smith Hickenlooper (February 13, 1880 – December 22, 1933) was a United States federal judge.

Born in Cincinnati, Ohio, Hickenlooper was the son of Andrew Hickenlooper and Maria L. Smith Hickenlooper.[1] He graduated from Woodward High School.[1] Hickenlooper received a B.A. from the University of Cincinnati in 1901 and an LL.B. from Harvard Law School in 1904.[2] He was in private practice in Cincinnati, Ohio from 1904 to 1918. He was a member of the Cincinnati Board of Education, Ohio from 1908 to 1909. He was an Assistant prosecuting attorney of Hamilton County, Ohio from 1916 to 1918. He was in the United States Army Private, Field Artillery in 1918.

He was a judge on the Superior Court of Cincinnati, Ohio from 1918 to 1923.[2] He was a member of the board of directors of the University of Cincinnati 1910 to 1916.[3]

Hickenlooper was a federal judge on the United States District Court for the Southern District of Ohio. Hickenlooper was nominated by President Warren G. Harding on March 3, 1923, to a seat vacated by John Weld Peck. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on March 3, 1923, and received his commission the same day. Hickenlooper served in that capacity until January 7, 1929, due to appointment to another judicial position.

Hickenlooper was a federal judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. Hickenlooper was nominated by President Calvin Coolidge on December 6, 1928, to a seat vacated by Maurice H. Donahue. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on December 17, 1928, and received his commission the same day. Hickenlooper served in that capacity until December 22, 1933, due to his death.

Hickenlooper married Anna Bailey Wright of Cincinnati on October 18, 1910.[1][3]

His grandson is politician John Hickenlooper, Governor of Colorado. He is also related to pianist Olga Samaroff, (nee Lucy Mary Olga Agnes Hickenlooper).[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Goss, Charles Frederic (1912). Cincinnati, the Queen City, 1788-1912. 3. Cincinnati: S J Clarke Publishing Company. pp. 374, 375. 
  2. ^ a b "Judge Hickenlooper Dies Attending Dance". The New York Times. December 23, 1933. p. 15. Retrieved April 2, 2015. 
  3. ^ a b Galbreath, Charles Burleigh (1925). History of Ohio. IV. Chicago: The American Historical Society. p. 389. ISBN 978-0-7812-5367-3. 
  4. ^ Hickenlooper, John; Potter, Maximillian (2016). The Opposite of Woe, My Life in Beer and Politics. New York: Penguin Press. pp. 37,112. 

Sources[edit]

Legal offices
Preceded by
John Weld Peck
Judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of Ohio
1923–1927
Succeeded by
Robert Reasoner Nevin
Preceded by
Maurice H. Donahue
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit
1928–1933
Succeeded by
Florence Ellinwood Allen