Snake Valley, Victoria

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Snake Valley
Victoria
Snake Valley Main Street.JPG
Main street of Snake Valley
Snake Valley is located in Pyrenees Shire
Snake Valley
Snake Valley
Coordinates 37°36′43″S 143°35′04″E / 37.61194°S 143.58444°E / -37.61194; 143.58444Coordinates: 37°36′43″S 143°35′04″E / 37.61194°S 143.58444°E / -37.61194; 143.58444
Population 329 (2006 census)[1]
Postcode(s) 3351
Location
LGA(s) Pyrenees Shire
State electorate(s) Ripon
Federal Division(s) Wannon

Snake Valley is a town in central Western Victoria, Australia, on Linton-Carngham Road, 27 kilometres (17 mi) west of Ballarat and 153 kilometres (95 mi) west of Melbourne, in the Shire of Pyrenees. At the 2006 census, Snake Valley had a population of 329.[1] A post office was opened on 1 March 1859.[2]

Aboriginal Snake Valley[edit]

Aborigines inhabited Snake Valley for tens of thousands of years before Europeans arrived. The Carringum balug clan of the Wathaurong are the traditional owners of the land surrounding Snake Valley/Carngham district.[3] The nearby town of Carngham therefore appears to be the name of the Aboriginal clan that originally lived in the area. They called Snake Valley itself Nimbuck[4] or Nimluck[5]

Religion[edit]

Snake Valley has churches of five Christian denominations, although not all of them are being used as places of worship. The Anglican Church of Holy Trinity is located on Linton-Carngham Rd and is a part of the Woady Yaloak Mission District, Anglican Diocese of Ballarat. The Catholic St Brigid's is located on the corner of Linton-Carngham Road and is a part of St Peter's Parish, Linton.[6] The Carngham Uniting Church on the Linton-Carngham Road has hosted organ recitals as part of the Organs of the Ballarat Goldfields Festival.[7]

Sport and recreation[edit]

Snake Valley has football, netball and cricket teams as well as an irregular 12 hole golf course.

Education[edit]

Woady Yaloak Primary School provides the first level of education to the town. Secondary students must travel to other places such as Ballarat or Beaufort for education.

Community[edit]

For a small population Snake Valley has a large number of active Community groups and organisations:

  • Snake Valley & District Historical Society,
  • Snake Valley Astronomical Association (SVAA),
  • Snake Valley-Carngham Branch Friends of the RSL,
  • Snake Valley CFA Auxiliary & Community Fireguard,
  • Mag Dam Reserve Group,
  • Snake Valley CERT (Community Emergency Response),
  • Carngham Recreation Reserve,
  • Woady Yaloak Primary School Parents and Friends Group,
  • Snake Valley & District CFA,
  • Snake Valley Landcare,
  • Snake Valley Playgroup,
  • St. Brigid's Altar Society,

Economy[edit]

The local economy is agricultural in nature. It is dominated by broad acre farming, grazing, and timber industries.

The township also contains a general store and a hotel.

Transport[edit]

Snake Valley is serviced by a twice-weekly bus service from Ballarat, which runs on Mondays and Fridays.[citation needed] The main means of transport is private vehicle.

Notable people[edit]

John "Jack" Worrall, Australian rules footballer and cricketer was born at Chinaman's Flat in the locality in 1861.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Australian Bureau of Statistics (25 October 2007). "Snake Valley (L) (Urban Centre/Locality)". 2006 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 26 July 2010. 
  2. ^ https://www.premierpostal.com/cgi-bin/wsProd.sh/Viewpocd.w?
  3. ^ Clark, Ian D.(1990).Aboriginal Languages and Clans: An historical atlas of western and central Victoria, as referenced in Our Precious Heritage Aboriginal Heritage Wada wurrung Culture and History , Retrieved 2010-02-13
  4. ^ Smyth, R. B. (1878). The aborigines of Victoria With notes relating to the habits of the natives of other parts of Australia and Tasmania compiled from various sources for the Government of Victoria. Vol. I. Melbourne: J. Ferres. p179 http://www1.aiatsis.gov.au/exhibitions/languages/smyth_pdf/m0050587_a.pdf. Retrieved 2010-02-13.
  5. ^ Smyth, R. B. (1878). The aborigines of Victoria With notes relating to the habits of the natives of other parts of Australia and Tasmania compiled from various sources for the Government of Victoria. Vol. I. Melbourne: J. Ferres. p 192 http://www1.aiatsis.gov.au/exhibitions/languages/smyth_pdf/m0053739_a.pdf. Retrieved 13 February 20103.
  6. ^ "Parishes", Catholic Diocese of Ballarat http://www.ballarat.com/organs/carngham_uniting_churchl.htm Retrieved 13 February 2010
  7. ^ Organs of the Ballarat Goldfields, Fifteenth Annual Festival http://www.ballarat.com/organs/carngham_uniting_churchl.htm Retrieved 13 February 2010

External links[edit]

Media related to Snake Valley, Victoria at Wikimedia Commons