Snow Business (company)

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Snow Business International Ltd
Public limited company
Founded1982 (1982)
FounderDarcey Crownshaw
HeadquartersStroud, Gloucestershire, England
Number of locations
25
Area served
Worldwide
ProductsArtificial snow and winter effects for TV & Film, Visual Merchandising & Events
Websitewww.snowbusiness.com

Snow Business is a provider of artificial snow for various entertainment industries.[1][2][3] The company was founded by Darcey Crownshaw in 1982.[4] Crownshaw was working in the paper industry when a production unit filming The Last Days of Pompeii for ABC-TV placed an order with his employers for three quarters of a ton of shredded grey cellulose paper to use as artificial volcanic ash.[5] The firm would not deliver less than 20 tons so Crownshaw fulfilled the order himself using the padding from Jiffy bags.[6] Crownshaw later supplied the same production unit with paper snow, and spotting a gap in the market established Snow Business.[4]

The company produces over 160 different types of artificial snow as well as frost, ice, snowballs, snowmen, icicles, igloos and icebergs.[7][8] Film credits include Band of Brothers, Die Another Day, The Day After Tomorrow, the Harry Potter series, The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, and The Golden Compass.[9][10]

On 23 November 2006 Snow Business International set a Guinness World Record for the largest area covered with continuously falling artificial snow, covering the New Bond Street, Bond Street and Old Bond Street areas of London simultaneously.[11][12] The area measured 12,462.78 m2 (134,148 ft2).[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Miles, Lucy (16 April 2000). "Snowman's fake flakes a real winner". Sunday Mercury. Birmingham. p. 15.
  2. ^ "No business like snow business". London Evening Standard. London. 28 September 2001. p. 27.
  3. ^ "How Darcey's idea has just snowballed: Everyone loves that first magical snowfall – so imagine earning your living from creating winter wonderlands for film and television". Gloucestershire Echo. Cheltenham. 21 August 2010. p. 6.
  4. ^ a b Crewe, Candida (9 December 2000). "Someone's got to do it". The Times. London.
  5. ^ Sweet, Matthew (22 December 2001). "THE SNOWMAN: Want to Turn Oxfordshire into a Winter Wonderland or Carpet St Pancras in Virgin Powder? Call Dave Crownshaw, the Movie Magician Who Makes It Snow All Year Round". The Independent. London. Retrieved 27 December 2013.  – via HighBeam Research (subscription required)
  6. ^ de Bruxelles, Simon (18 May 1999). "Movies pay millions for the right sort of snow". The Times. London. p. 15.
  7. ^ "There's Snow Business Like". Western Mail. Cardiff. 30 December 2002. Retrieved 27 December 2013.  – via HighBeam Research (subscription required)
  8. ^ Greenbaum, Hilary; Rubinstein, Dana (17 February 2012). "Who Made That Artificial Snow?". The New York Times. New York. Retrieved 28 December 2013.
  9. ^ "Movie world experts make the first snowman of the season out of real snow". Western Daily Press. Bristol. 19 October 2013. p. 10.
  10. ^ Varma, Anuji (10 January 2010). "ICE bit of business". Sunday Mercury. Birmingham. p. 4.
  11. ^ Elliott, Caroline (22 December 2011). "There's no business like Snow Business". Engineering & Technology. London. Retrieved 28 December 2013.
  12. ^ Burke, Maria (20 December 2011). "Let it snow..." Society of Chemical Industry. Retrieved 28 December 2013.
  13. ^ "Largest area covered by artificial snowfall". Guinness World Records. Retrieved 28 December 2013.

Further reading[edit]