So This Is Marriage

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So This Is Marriage
So This Is Marriage in Metro-Goldwyn presentation book (Australia), 1924.jpg
Australian advertisement from MGM press book
Directed byHobart Henley
Written byJohn Lynch
Alice D. G. Miller
StarringConrad Nagel
Eleanor Boardman
CinematographyJohn Arnold
Distributed byMetro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Release date
  • November 24, 1924 (1924-11-24)
Running time
70 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageSilent (English intertitles)

So This Is Marriage is a lost 1924 American silent drama film directed by Hobart Henley. The film was originally released with sequences filmed in the Technicolor 2-color process that depicted the story of David and Bathsheba from the Book of Samuel.[1][2]

Plot[edit]

As described in a review in a film magazine,[3] after their engagement, where he dreams of wealth and power, a big house full of boys, and she of clothes, Peter Marsh (Nagel) marries Beth (Boardman) and their troubles begin. Beth is extravagant and Peter becomes irritated and they have frequent rows. Peter prospers in business yet has a hard time meeting their bills. Rankin (Cody), a connoisseur of women, sees Beth and frames-up an accident to her car so he can come to her assistance. Finally, he invites her to a dance and Peter, who has chided her regarding this acquaintance as he sees how Rankin is endeavoring to win his wife, orders her not to go. She goes anyway and they have a terrible row. Beth leaves and goes to Rankin who, finding that she still loves her husband, tells her the story of the woe that befell King David (Oland) and Bathsheba (Scott) because of their forbidden love. Beth sees the point and goes back to her husband and baby, while Rankin prepares for other conquests.

Cast[edit]

Preservation[edit]

With no copies or prints of So This Is Marriage located in any film archives,[4] it is a lost film. The last known copy of this film was destroyed in the 1965 MGM vault fire.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Elaborate biblical scenes to be made in color for Metro Production". American Cinematographer. 4: 13. November 1924. Retrieved September 6, 2020.
  2. ^ Progressive Silent Film List: So This Is Marriage at silentera.com
  3. ^ Sewell, Charles S. (January 3, 1925). "So This Is Marriage; Metro-Goldwyn Comedy-Drama of Newly Married Life Provides Thoroughly Enjoyable Entertainment". The Moving Picture World. New York City: Chalmers Publishing Co. 72 (1): 57.
  4. ^ The Library of Congress / FIAF American Silent Feature Film Survival Catalog: So This Is Marriage?

External links[edit]