Social genome

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

The social genome is the collection of data about members of a society that is captured in ever-larger and ever-more complex databases (e.g., government administrative data, operational data, social media data etc.). Some have used the term digital footprint to refer to individual traces.

History[edit]

There have been two distinct uses of the term. First, the word Social Genome was used in a letter to the editor submission to Science in response to a seminal article about using big data for social science by King.[1] The letter[2] was published, but the word social genome was edited out of the letter. The original submission states, “A well-integrated federated data system of administrative databases updated on an ongoing basis could hold a collective representation of our society, our social genome.” Kum and others continue to use the word since 2011, with it being defined in a peer reviewed article in 2013.[3] It states “Today there is a constant flow of data into, out of, and between ever-larger and ever-more complex databases about people. Together, these digital traces collectively capture our social genome, the footprints of our society.” In 2014, a vision paper[4] on population informatics was published which further elaborated on the term.

Second, separately at about the same time, a group of researchers led by the Brookings Institution started the Social Genome Project which built a data-rich model to map the pathway to the Middle class by tracing the life course from birth until middle age. The first paper[5] was published in 2012.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ King, Gary (2011-02-11). "Ensuring the Data-Rich Future of the Social Sciences". Science. 331 (6018): 719–721. doi:10.1126/science.1197872. ISSN 0036-8075. PMID 21311013.
  2. ^ Kum, Hye-Chung; Ahalt, Stanley; Carsey, Thomas M. (June 10, 2011). "Dealing with data: governments records". Science. 332 (6035): 1263. doi:10.1126/science.332.6035.1263-a. PMID 21659589.
  3. ^ Kum, Hye-Chung; Ahalt, Stanley (2013-01-01). "Privacy-by-Design: Understanding Data Access Models for Secondary Data". AMIA Joint Summits on Translational Science proceedings AMIA Summit on Translational Science. 2013: 126–130. ISSN 2153-4063. PMC 3845756. PMID 24303251.
  4. ^ Kum, Hye-Chung; Krishnamurthy, A.; Machanavajjhala, A.; Ahalt, S.C. (2014-01-01). "Social Genome: Putting Big Data to Work for Population Informatics". Computer. 47 (1): 56–63. doi:10.1109/MC.2013.405. ISSN 0018-9162.
  5. ^ "Pathways to the Middle Class: Balancing Personal and Public Responsibilities". The Brookings Institution. 2012-09-20. Retrieved 2015-11-28.

External links[edit]