Society for Conservation Biology

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Society for Conservation Biology
Founded May 8, 1985[1]
Type Scientific society
33-0147824 (U.S.A.)[2]
Focus conservation biology, education, policy
Location
Members
10,000[3]
Revenue
US$2,786,389 (2008)[4]
Endowment US$923,751 (2008)[4]
Employees
14
Volunteers
~200
Slogan A Global Community of Conservation Professionals[5]
Mission To advance the science and practice of conserving the Earth's biological diversity.[3]
Website www.conbio.org

The Society for Conservation Biology (SCB) is an 501(c)3 non-profit international professional organization devoted to scientific study of the "maintenance, loss, and restoration of biological diversity." [6] There are 10,000 members worldwide, including students and those in related non-academic sectors. There are 31 chapters in the United States, and 13 throughout the world elsewhere.[7]

The origin of the Society resulted from the emergence of the field as a distinct subject in the 1970s. The phrase conservation biology originated from a conference of ecologists and population biologists at the University of Michigan,that published the book "Conservation Biology" An Evolutionary-Ecological Perspective [8] was highly influential internationally, eventually selling tens of thousands of copies including a Russian translation. By the mid-1980s there was sufficient interest and participation to establish a formal society and publish a peer reviewed journal Conservation Biology, started in 1987 and published by Blackwell Scientific Publishers. This has been supplemented since 2007 by the rapid publication journal Conservation Letters ISSN 1755-263X. It also has published jointly with the University of Washington since 1997 the non-technical Conservation (also known as Conservation Magazine), ISSN 1936-2145.[9]

Sections[edit]

In 2000 the SCB Board of Governors approved the creation of seven Regional Sections that were formed over the following two years. The seven sections are Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America & Caribbean, North America, Marine and Oceania. The Europe Section was established at the annual SCB meeting in Canterbury 2002. The Oceania section was established in 2005.

Chapters[edit]

SCB chapters are local groupings that are associated with regional sections, and are a means to work locally to achieve conservation success.[10] The following chapters are listed within each of the seven sections:

Europe Section[edit]

Section meeting at Freiburg, 2010

The Europe Section is dedicated to advancing the science and practice of conserving Europe’s biological diversity and ecosystem services. It was established at the annual SCB meeting in Canterbury 2002. The mission of the Europe Section is to promote conservation biology and its application to conserve biological diversity in Europe (like Natura 2000). SCB-ES has an international 12 member Board of Directors and task-oriented committees including Policy, Education, Communication, Membership and Student Affairs Committees.

SCB Europe organises the series of European Congress of Conservation Biology. This facilitates the exchange on conservation science and nature conservation practice and policy, with the aim of promoting the protection of biological diversity in Europe.

Oceania Section[edit]

The Oceania Section is a regional section of the Society, representing Oceania, including Australia, New Zealand and Pacific Island regions. The Board of Governors of global SCB approved the creation of regional sections in 2000, and the Oceania Section, with an elected, independent Board of Directors, was established in 2005.

Mission and role[edit]

The vision of the SCB-Oceania section is to act as a "catalyst for doing and synthesising science and raising capacities of local communities that effect change for conservation", and sets out four program goals:

  • Conservation Science
  • Conservation Management
  • Policy
  • Education

It promotes conservation science in the following countries and territories: American Samoa, Australia, Cook Islands, Fiji, French Polynesia, Guam, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Nauru, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Niue, Norfolk Island, Northern Mariana Islands, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Pitcairn Islands, Saipan, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tokelau, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, and Wallis & Futuna

Conferences and meetings[edit]

It has held or helped organizing the following conferences and meetings:[12][13]

  • "The Biodiversity Extinction Crisis — An Australian and Pacific Response"[14][15] in Sydney, Australia (2007)
  • "People and Conservation in Land and Sea Country"[12][16] in Darwin, Australia (2012)
  • "Student Conference on Conservation Science"[17] in Brisbane, Australia (2013)

Another SCB-Oceania section meeting will be held in Suva, Fiji in July, 2014[13]

Affiliated publication[edit]

SCB Oceania supports the publication of the peer-reviewed quarterly journal Pacific Conservation Biology[18] (ISSN 1038-2097),[19] which "is dedicated to conservation and wildlife management in the Pacific region".[20] The current editor in chief is Mike Calver of Murdoch University.[21] The journal, published by Surrey Beatty and Sons Pty Ltd,[22] does not have an ISI impact factor yet.[19]

Chapters[edit]

There are currently three regional chapters associated with the Oceania Section of SCB:[23]

SCB Iran Chapter has been stablished recently in Kurdistan University, Sanandaj, Iran.

Working groups[edit]

Several working groups help to advance the society's work in specific areas of conservation.

  • Social Sciences
  • Ecological economics and sustainability science
  • Fresh Water
  • Religion and Conservation Biology

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.conbio.org/AboutUs/History/
  2. ^ http://www.conbio.org/help/501c3.cfm
  3. ^ a b http://www.conbio.org/AboutUs/
  4. ^ a b http://www.conbio.org/AboutUs/AnnualReport/2008ARsm.pdf
  5. ^ http://www.conbio.org/
  6. ^ http://www.geog.uvic.ca/dept/news/localchp.htm
  7. ^ [1]
  8. ^ Soule, M. E. and B. A. Wilcox. 1980. "Conservation Biology" An Evolutionary-Ecological Perspective. Sinauer Associates. Sunderland. Massachusetts
  9. ^ WorldCat
  10. ^ http://www.conbio.org/groups/chapters/chapter-directory
  11. ^ http://www.conbio.org/groups/chapters/chapter-directory/north-america
  12. ^ a b http://www.nerpdecisions.edu.au/84-news/14-scb-oceania-section-regional-conference.html
  13. ^ a b "Society for Conservation Biology | Meetings". Conbio.org. 2013-01-30. Retrieved 2013-11-27. 
  14. ^ Lunney, D (2007), Conference report on The biodiversity extinction crisis: an Australian and Pacific response, Ecological management and restoration, vol. 8, 241–42.
  15. ^ "Society for Conservation Biology | Oceania 2007". Conbio.org. Retrieved 2013-11-27. 
  16. ^ "Society for Conservation Biology Conference - Oceania 2012 - Darwin, Australia". Nailsma. 2012-09-23. Retrieved 2013-11-27. 
  17. ^ "Student Conference on Conservation Science Australia - Home". Sccs-aus.org. 2013-01-31. Retrieved 2013-11-27. 
  18. ^ "Society for Conservation Biology | Affiliate Publications". Conbio.org. Retrieved 2013-11-27. 
  19. ^ a b "Pacific Conservation Biology". Scimagojr.com. Retrieved 2013-11-27. 
  20. ^ "Pacific Conservation Biology". Pcb.murdoch.edu.au. Retrieved 2013-11-27. 
  21. ^ "Pacific Conservation Biology: Editors". Pcb.murdoch.edu.au. Retrieved 2013-11-27. 
  22. ^ "PCB". Surreybeatty.com.au. Retrieved 2013-11-27. 
  23. ^ "Society for Conservation Biology | Oceania". Conbio.org. Retrieved 2013-11-27. 
  24. ^ http://naturespace.org.nz/groups/society-for-conservation-biology-at-victoria-university-of-wellington
  25. ^ "Updates - Society for Conservation Biology, VUW Chapter". Vuwscb.com. Retrieved 2013-11-27. 
  26. ^ http://www.gpem.uq.edu.au/scb
  27. ^ "Society for Conservation Biology Brisbane-UQ | A community of conservation professionals based in Brisbane and The University of Queensland". Scbbrisbaneuq.wordpress.com. 2013-05-23. Retrieved 2013-11-27. 
  28. ^ http://www.science.unsw.edu.au/news/seminar-sydney-society-conservation-biology
  29. ^ "about". Sydneyscb.org. Retrieved 2013-11-27. 

External links[edit]