Sodium metavanadate

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Sodium metavanadate
NaVO3.tif
Names
IUPAC name
Sodium trioxovanadate(V)
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ECHA InfoCard 100.033.869 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 237-272-7
RTECS number
  • YW1050000
UNII
  • InChI=1S/Na.3O.V/q+1;;;-1;
  • [O-][V](=O)=O.[Na+]
Properties
NaVO3
Molar mass 121.9295 g/mol
Appearance yellow crystalline solid
Density 2.84g/cm3
Melting point 630 °C (1,166 °F; 903 K)
19.3 g/100 mL (20 °C)
40.8 g/100 mL (80 °C)
Thermochemistry
97.6 J/mol K
113.8 J/mol K
−1148 kJ/mol
Hazards
Main hazards Toxic, irritant
NFPA 704 (fire diamond)
2
0
0
Flash point Non-flammable
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
98 mg/kg (rat, oral)
Related compounds
Other anions
Sodium orthovanadate
Other cations
Ammonium metavanadate
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references
Chain of tetrahedral vanadate [VO4] units, each sharing two corners

Sodium metavanadate is the inorganic compound with the formula NaVO3.[1] It is a yellow, water-soluble solid.

Sodium metavanadate is a common precursor to other vanadates. At low pH it converts to sodium decavanadate. It is also precursor to exotic metalates such as [γ-PV2W10O40]5-, [α-PVW11O40]4-, and [β-PV2W10O40]5-.[2]

Minerals[edit]

Sodium metavanadate occurs as two minor minerals, metamunirite (anhydrous) and a dihydrate, munirite. Both are very rare, metamunirite is now known only from vanadium- and uranium-bearing sandstone formations of central-western USA and munirite from Pakistan and South Africa.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kato, K.; Takayama, E. (1984). "Das Entwässerungsverhalten des Natriummetavanadatdihydrats und die Kristallstruktur des beta-Natriummetavanadats" [The dehydration activity of sodium metavanadate dihydrate and the crystal structure of β-sodium metavanadate]. Acta Crystallogr. B40 (2): 102–105. doi:10.1107/S0108768184001828.
  2. ^ Domaille, Peter J. (2007). "Vanadium(V) Substituted Dodecatungstophosphates". Inorganic Syntheses: 96–104. doi:10.1002/9780470132586.ch17. ISBN 9780470132586.
  3. ^ "Munirite". Mindat.