Sodium picosulfate

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Sodium picosulfate
Sodium picosulfate.svg
Ball-and-stick model of the component ions of sodium picosulfate
Systematic (IUPAC) name
disodium (pyridin-2-ylmethylene)di-4,1-phenylene disulfate
Clinical data
AHFS/Drugs.com International Drug Names
Routes of
administration
Oral
Identifiers
CAS Registry Number 10040-45-6 N
ATC code A06AB08
A06AB58 (combinations)
PubChem CID: 68654
ChemSpider 61910 YesY
UNII LR57574HN8 N
Chemical data
Formula C18H13NNa2O8S2
Molecular mass 481.409 g/mol
 N (what is this?)  (verify)

Sodium picosulfate (INN, also known as sodium picosulphate) is a contact laxative used as a treatment for constipation or to prepare the large bowel before colonoscopy or surgery. It is sold under the trade names Sodipic Picofast, Laxoberal, Laxoberon,[1] Purg-Odan, Picolax, Picoprep,[2] Guttalax, Pico-Salax[3] and Prepopik [4] among others.

Effects[edit]

Orally administered sodium picosulfate is generally used for thorough evacuation of the bowel, usually for patients who are preparing to undergo a colonoscopy. It works very quickly, so access to a toilet at all times is recommended. It starts off by making bowel movements looser and more frequent, but within an hour or so of taking it the patient should experience diarrhea.

The most common side effects of picosulfate are abdominal cramps and diarrhea.

The use of sodium picosulfate has also been associated with certain electrolyte disturbances, such as hyponatremia and hypokalemia.[5] Patients are often required to drink large amounts of clear fluids as well as rehydrate to reestablish the electrolyte balance.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Website of Merck Pakistan
  2. ^ Picoprep study at ingentaconnect 'Picoprep-3 Is a Superior Colonoscopy Preparation to Fleet: A Randomized, Controlled Trial Comparing the Two Bowel Preparations' study at St George Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia
  3. ^ PICO SALAX Product Information
  4. ^ FDA approves new colon-cleansing drug for colonoscopy prep
  5. ^ ADRAC (February 2002). "Electrolyte disturbances with sodium picosulfate bowel cleansing products". Aust Adv Drug React Bull 21 (1).  Free full text from the Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration