Solar eclipse of February 26, 2017

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Solar eclipse of February 26, 2017
26-feb-2017 solar ecipse.jpg
SE2017Feb26A.png
Map
Type of eclipse
NatureAnnular
Gamma-0.4578
Magnitude0.9922
Maximum eclipse
Duration44 sec (0 m 44 s)
Coordinates34°42′S 31°12′W / 34.7°S 31.2°W / -34.7; -31.2
Max. width of band31 km (19 mi)
Times (UTC)
Greatest eclipse14:54:33
References
Saros140 (29 of 71)
Catalog # (SE5000)9545

An annular solar eclipse took place on February 26, 2017. A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partly obscuring the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth. An annular solar eclipse occurs when the Moon's apparent diameter is smaller than the Sun's, blocking most of the Sun's light and causing the Sun to look like an annulus (ring). An annular eclipse appears as a partial eclipse over a region of the Earth thousands of kilometres wide. Occurring only 4.7 days before perigee (Perigee on March 3, 2017), the Moon's apparent diameter was larger. The moon's apparent diameter was just over 0.7% smaller than the Sun's.

February 26 is the 57th day of the year in Gregorian Calendar.

It was visible across southern South America in the morning and ended in south-western Africa at sunset. In Argentina, the best places to see the eclipse were located in the south of the Chubut Province, in the towns of Facundo, Sarmiento and Camarones. Lunar Perigee occurred at about 2017 Mar 03 at 07:41:24.5 UTC, 4.7 days later.

Predictions and additional information[edit]

Eclipse characteristics[edit]

Eclipse Magnitude: 0.99223

Eclipse Obscuration: 0.98451

Gamma: -0.45780

Saros Series: 140th (29 of 71)

Conjunction times[edit]

Greatest Eclipse: 26 Feb 2017 14:53:24.5 UTC (14:54:32.8 TD)

Ecliptic Conjunction: 26 Feb 2017 14:58:23.4 UTC (14:59:31.7 TD)

Equatorial Conjunction: 26 Feb 2017 14:38:46.0 UTC (14:39:54.4 TD)

Geocentric coordinates of sun and moon[edit]

Sun right ascension: 22.66

Sun declination: -8.5

Sun diameter: 1938.0 arcseconds

Moon right ascension: 22.66

Moon declination: -8.9

Moon diameter: 1895.6 arcseconds

Geocentric libration of moon[edit]

Latitude: 5.1 degrees south

Longitude: 0.6 degrees east

Direction: 336.5 (NNW)

Images[edit]

Animation assembled from 3 images acquired by NASA’s Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera.

Gallery[edit]

Related eclipses[edit]

Eclipses of 2017[edit]

Solar eclipses descending node 2015-2018[edit]

Tzolkinex[edit]

Preceded: Solar eclipse of January 15, 2010

Followed: Solar eclipse of April 8, 2024

Half-Saros cycle[edit]

Preceded: Lunar eclipse of February 21, 2008

Followed: Lunar eclipse of March 3, 2026

Tritos[edit]

Preceded: Solar eclipse of March 29, 2006

Followed: Solar eclipse of January 26, 2028

Solar Saros 140[edit]

Preceded: Solar eclipse of February 16, 1999

Followed: Solar eclipse of March 9, 2035

Inex[edit]

Preceded: Solar eclipse of March 18, 1988

Followed: Solar eclipse of February 5, 2046

Triad[edit]

Preceded: Solar eclipse of April 28, 1930

Followed: Solar eclipse of December 29, 2103

Solar eclipses 2015–2018[edit]

This eclipse is a member of a semester series. An eclipse in a semester series of solar eclipses repeats approximately every 177 days and 4 hours (a semester) at alternating nodes of the Moon's orbit.[1]

Solar eclipse series sets from 2015–2018
Descending node   Ascending node
Saros Map Gamma Saros Map Gamma
120
Total solar eclipse of March 20, 2015 by Damien Deltenre (licensed for free use). (32844461616).jpg
Longyearbyen, Svalbard
2015 March 20
SE2015Mar20T.png
Total
0.9453 125 2015 September 13
SE2015Sep13P.png
Partial
-1.1004
130
Total Solar Eclipse, 9 March 2016, from Balikpapan, East Kalimantan, Indonesia.JPG
Balikpapan, Indonesia
2016 March 9
SE2016Mar09T.png
Total
0.2609 135
Eclipse 20160901 center.jpg
L'Étang-Salé, Réunion
2016 September 1
SE2016Sep01A.png
Annular
-0.3330
140
26-feb-2017 solar ecipse.jpg
Partial from Buenos Aires
2017 February 26
SE2017Feb26A.png
Annular
-0.4578 145
Solar eclipse, Miles Landing 8-21-17 (36842678271).jpg
Casper, Wyoming
2017 August 21
Solar eclipse global visibility 2017Aug21T.png
Total
0.4367
150
Eclipse Solar Parcial - 15.02.2018 - Olivos, GBA (Argentina).jpg
Partial from Olivos, Buenos Aires
2018 February 15
SE2018Feb15P.png
Partial
-1.2117 155
2018.08.11 1214Z C8F6 Solar Eclipse (43976490201).jpg
Partial from Huittinen, Finland
2018 August 11
SE2018Aug11P.png
Partial
1.1476
Partial solar eclipses on July 13, 2018, and January 6, 2019, occur during the next semester series.

Saros 140[edit]

It is a part of Saros cycle 140, repeating every 18 years, 11 days, containing 71 events. The series started with partial solar eclipse on April 16, 1512. It contains total eclipses from July 21, 1656 through November 9, 1836, hybrid eclipses from November 20, 1854 through December 23, 1908, and annular eclipses from January 3, 1927 through December 7, 2485. The series ends at member 71 as a partial eclipse on June 1, 2774. The longest duration of totality was 4 minutes, 10 seconds on August 12, 1692.

Inex series[edit]

This eclipse is a part of the long period inex cycle, repeating at alternating nodes, every 358 synodic months (≈ 10,571.95 days, or 29 years minus 20 days). Their appearance and longitude are irregular due to a lack of synchronization with the anomalistic month (period of perigee). However, groupings of 3 inex cycles (≈ 87 years minus 2 months) comes close (≈ 1,151.02 anomalistic months), so eclipses are similar in these groupings.

Metonic cycle[edit]

The metonic series repeats eclipses every 19 years (6939.69 days), lasting about 5 cycles. Eclipses occur in nearly the same calendar date. In addition, the octon subseries repeats 1/5 of that or every 3.8 years (1387.94 days). All eclipses in this table occur at the Moon's descending node.

21 events between July 22, 1971 and July 22, 2047
July 21–22 May 9–11 February 26–27 December 14–15 October 2–3
106 108 110 112 114
July 21, 1952 May 10, 1956 February 26, 1960 December 16, 1963 October 3, 1967
116 118 120 122 124
SE1971Jul22P.png
July 22, 1971
SE1975May11P.png
May 11, 1975
SE1979Feb26T.png
February 26, 1979
SE1982Dec15P.png
December 15, 1982
SE1986Oct03H.png
October 3, 1986
126 128 130 132 134
SE1990Jul22T.png
July 22, 1990
SE1994May10A.png
May 10, 1994
SE1998Feb26T.png
February 26, 1998
SE2001Dec14A.png
December 14, 2001
SE2005Oct03A.png
October 3, 2005
136 138 140 142 144
SE2009Jul22T.png
July 22, 2009
SE2013May10A.png
May 10, 2013
SE2017Feb26A.png
February 26, 2017
SE2020Dec14T.png
December 14, 2020
SE2024Oct02A.png
October 2, 2024
146 148 150 152 154
SE2028Jul22T.png
July 22, 2028
SE2032May09A.png
May 9, 2032
SE2036Feb27P.png
February 27, 2036
SE2039Dec15T.png
December 15, 2039
SE2043Oct03A.png
October 3, 2043
156
SE2047Jul22P.png
July 22, 2047

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ van Gent, R.H. "Solar- and Lunar-Eclipse Predictions from Antiquity to the Present". A Catalogue of Eclipse Cycles. Utrecht University. Retrieved 6 October 2018.

References[edit]

External links[edit]