Solar eclipse of January 4, 2011

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Solar eclipse of January 4, 2011
Solar eclipse poland 4thjan2011.jpg
Partial from Poland
SE2011Jan04P.png
Map
Type of eclipse
NaturePartial
Gamma1.0627
Magnitude0.8576
Maximum eclipse
Coordinates64°42′N 20°48′E / 64.7°N 20.8°E / 64.7; 20.8
Times (UTC)
(P1) Partial begin6:40:11
Greatest eclipse8:51:42
(P4) Partial end11:00:52
References
Saros151 (14 of 72)
Catalog # (SE5000)9531

The solar eclipse of January 4, 2011 was a partial eclipse of the Sun that was visible after sunrise over most of Europe, northwestern and South Asia. It ended at sunset over eastern Asia. It was visible as a minor partial eclipse over northern Africa and the Arabian peninsula. The eclipse belonged to Saros 151 and was number 14 of 72 eclipses in the series.

Greatest eclipse occurred at 08:51 UTC in northern Sweden where the eclipse in the horizon had a magnitude of 0.858. At that time, the axis of the Moon's shadow passed a mere 510 km above Earth's surface.[1]

A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partly obscuring the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth. A partial solar eclipse occurs in the polar regions of the Earth when the center of the Moon's shadow misses the Earth. This was the first of four partial solar eclipses in 2011, with the others occurring on June 1, 2011, July 1, 2011, and November 25, 2011.

It also precedes the two total lunar eclipses occurring on June 15, 2011 and December 10, 2011.

Visibility[edit]

SE2011Jan04P.gif
Animated path

Photo gallery[edit]

Related eclipses[edit]

Eclipses of 2011[edit]

It was preceded two weeks earlier by the total lunar eclipse of December 21, 2010.

Solar eclipses 2008–2011[edit]

This eclipse is a member of a semester series. An eclipse in a semester series of solar eclipses repeats approximately every 177 days and 4 hours (a semester) at alternating nodes of the Moon's orbit.[2]

Solar eclipse series sets from 2008–2011
Ascending node   Descending node
Saros Map Gamma Saros Map Gamma
121
Solar eclipse 2008Feb07-New Zealand-partial-Greg Hewgill.jpg
Partial from Christchurch, NZ
2008 February 07
SE2008Feb07A.png
Annular
-0.9570 126
NovosibirskTotalEclipsePhoto-cropped.jpg
Novosibirsk, Russia
2008 August 01
SE2008Aug01T.png
Total
0.8307
131
Solar Eclipse from Riversdale South Africa by Wim Filmalter (3238794030) (cropped).jpg
Partial from Riversdal
2009 January 26
SE2009Jan26A.png
Annular
-0.2819 136
Solar eclipse 22 July 2009 taken by Lutfar Rahman Nirjhar from Bangladesh.jpg
Kurigram, Bangladesh
2009 July 22
SE2009Jul22T.png
Total
0.0698
141
(closeup) Solar annular eclipse of January 15, 2010 in Bangui, Central African Republic.JPG
Bangui, Central African Republic
2010 January 15
SE2010Jan15A.png
Annular
0.4002 146
Eclipse 2010 Hao 1.JPG
Hao, French Polynesia
2010 July 11
SE2010Jul11T.png
Total
-0.6787
151
Solar eclipse Vienna 2011-1-4 a.jpg
Partial from Vienna, Austria
2011 January 04
SE2011Jan04P.png
Partial (north)
1.0626 156 2011 July 01
SE2011Jul01P.png
Partial (south)
-1.4917
Partial solar eclipses on June 1, 2011, and November 25, 2011, occur on the next lunar year eclipse set.

Metonic series[edit]

The metonic series repeats eclipses every 19 years (6939.69 days), lasting about 5 cycles. Eclipses occur in nearly the same calendar date. In addition, the octon subseries repeats 1/5 of that or every 3.8 years (1387.94 days). All eclipses in this table occur at the Moon's ascending node.

22 eclipse events between January 5, 1935 and August 11, 2018
January 4-5 October 23-24 August 10-12 May 30-31 March 18-19
111 113 115 117 119
SE1935Jan05P.png
January 5, 1935
SE1942Aug12P.png
August 12, 1942
SE1946May30P.png
May 30, 1946
SE1950Mar18A.png
March 18, 1950
121 123 125 127 129
SE1954Jan05A.png
January 5, 1954
SE1957Oct23T.png
October 23, 1957
SE1961Aug11A.png
August 11, 1961
SE1965May30T.png
May 30, 1965
SE1969Mar18A.png
March 18, 1969
131 133 135 137 139
SE1973Jan04A.png
January 4, 1973
SE1976Oct23T.png
October 23, 1976
SE1980Aug10A.png
August 10, 1980
SE1984May30A.png
May 30, 1984
SE1988Mar18T.png
March 18, 1988
141 143 145 147 149
SE1992Jan04A.png
January 4, 1992
SE1995Oct24T.png
October 24, 1995
SE1999Aug11T.png
August 11, 1999
SE2003May31A.png
May 31, 2003
SE2007Mar19P.png
March 19, 2007
151 153 155
SE2011Jan04P.png
January 4, 2011
SE2014Oct23P.png
October 23, 2014
SE2018Aug11P.png
August 11, 2018

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Eclipses during 2011 NASA
  2. ^ van Gent, R.H. "Solar- and Lunar-Eclipse Predictions from Antiquity to the Present". A Catalogue of Eclipse Cycles. Utrecht University. Retrieved 6 October 2018.

References[edit]

External links[edit]