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Solar eclipse of June 10, 2021

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Solar eclipse of June 10, 2021
Partial from Halifax, Canada
Map
Type of eclipse
NatureAnnular
Gamma0.9152
Magnitude0.9435
Maximum eclipse
Duration231 s (3 min 51 s)
Coordinates80°48′N 66°48′W / 80.8°N 66.8°W / 80.8; -66.8
Max. width of band527 km (327 mi)
Times (UTC)
Greatest eclipse10:43:07
References
Saros147 (23 of 80)
Catalog # (SE5000)9555

An annular solar eclipse occurred at the Moon’s ascending node of orbit on Thursday, June 10, 2021,[1][2][3] with a magnitude of 0.9435. An annular solar eclipse is a solar eclipse whose presentation looks like a ring, or annulus; it occurs when the Moon's apparent diameter is smaller than the Sun's, blocking most, but not all, of the Sun's light. The annular eclipse was visible from parts of northeastern Canada, Greenland, the Arctic Ocean (passing over the North Pole),[4] and the Russian Far East, whilst the eclipse appeared partial from a region thousands of kilometres wide, which included northeastern North America, most of Europe, and northern Asia.[5]

Path

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Animated image showing the path of the eclipse shadows.

The annular eclipse started at 09:55 UTC for 3 minutes 37 seconds along the northern shore of Lake Superior in Ontario, Canada. The path of the antumbral shadow then headed across Hudson Bay through northwestern Quebec and the Hudson Strait to Baffin Island in Nunavut, where the town of Iqaluit saw 3 minutes and 5 seconds of annularity. After this, it then travelled across Baffin Bay and along the northwestern coast of Greenland, where the point of greatest eclipse occurred at 10:41 UTC in Nares Strait for 3 minutes 51 seconds. The shadow then crossed Ellesmere Island and the Arctic Ocean, passing over the North Pole (which was located away from the central line of the eclipse but saw 2 minutes and 36 seconds of annularity), before heading south towards northeastern Siberia, where the city of Srednekolymsk saw 3 minutes and 35 seconds of annularity at 11:27 UTC. Shortly afterwards, the central line of the annular eclipse ended at 11:29 UTC.[6][7]

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Other eclipses in 2021

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Metonic

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Tzolkinex

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Half-Saros

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Tritos

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Solar Saros 147

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Inex

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Triad

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Solar eclipses of 2018–2021

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This eclipse is a member of a semester series. An eclipse in a semester series of solar eclipses repeats approximately every 177 days and 4 hours (a semester) at alternating nodes of the Moon's orbit.[8]

The partial solar eclipses on February 15, 2018 and August 11, 2018 occur in the previous lunar year eclipse set.

Solar eclipse series sets from 2018 to 2021
Ascending node   Descending node
Saros Map Gamma Saros Map Gamma
117

Partial in Melbourne, Australia
July 13, 2018

Partial
−1.35423 122

Partial in Nakhodka, Russia
January 6, 2019

Partial
1.14174
127

Totality in La Serena, Chile
July 2, 2019

Total
−0.64656 132

Annularity in Jaffna, Sri Lanka
December 26, 2019

Annular
0.41351
137

Annularity in Beigang, Yunlin, Taiwan
June 21, 2020

Annular
0.12090 142

Totality in Gorbea, Chile
December 14, 2020

Total
−0.29394
147

Partial in Halifax, Canada
June 10, 2021

Annular
0.91516 152

From HMS Protector off South Georgia
December 4, 2021

Total
−0.95261

Saros 147

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This eclipse is a part of Saros series 147, repeating every 18 years, 11 days, and containing 80 events. The series started with a partial solar eclipse on October 12, 1624. It contains annular eclipses from May 31, 2003 through July 31, 2706. There are no hybrid or total eclipses in this set. The series ends at member 80 as a partial eclipse on February 24, 3049. Its eclipses are tabulated in three columns; every third eclipse in the same column is one exeligmos apart, so they all cast shadows over approximately the same parts of the Earth.

The longest duration of annularity will be produced by member 38 at 9 minutes, 41 seconds on November 21, 2291. All eclipses in this series occur at the Moon’s ascending node of orbit.[9]

Series members 11–32 occur between 1801 and 2200:
11 12 13

January 30, 1805

February 11, 1823

February 21, 1841
14 15 16

March 4, 1859

March 15, 1877

March 26, 1895
17 18 19

April 6, 1913

April 18, 1931

April 28, 1949
20 21 22

May 9, 1967

May 19, 1985

May 31, 2003
23 24 25

June 10, 2021

June 21, 2039

July 1, 2057
26 27 28

July 13, 2075

July 23, 2093

August 4, 2111
29 30 31

August 15, 2129

August 26, 2147

September 5, 2165
32

September 16, 2183

Inex series

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This eclipse is a part of the long period inex cycle, repeating at alternating nodes, every 358 synodic months (≈ 10,571.95 days, or 29 years minus 20 days). Their appearance and longitude are irregular due to a lack of synchronization with the anomalistic month (period of perigee). However, groupings of 3 inex cycles (≈ 87 years minus 2 months) comes close (≈ 1,151.02 anomalistic months), so eclipses are similar in these groupings. In the 19th century:

  • Solar saros 140: total solar eclipse of October 29, 1818
  • Solar saros 141: annular solar eclipse of October 9, 1847
  • Solar saros 142: total solar eclipse of September 17, 1876

In the 22nd century:

  • Solar Saros 150: Partial solar eclipse of April 11, 2108
  • Solar Saros 151: Annular solar eclwssipse of March 21, 2137
  • Solar Saros 152: Total solar eclipse of March 2, 2166
  • Solar Saros 153: Annular solar eclipse of February 10, 2195

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Metonic series

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The metonic series repeats eclipses every 19 years (6939.69 days), lasting about 5 cycles. Eclipses occur in nearly the same calendar date. In addition, the octon subseries repeats 1/5 of that or every 3.8 years (1387.94 days). All eclipses in this table occur at the Moon's ascending node.

20 eclipse events between June 10, 1964 and August 21, 2036
June 10–11 March 28–29 January 14–16 November 3 August 21–22
117 119 121 123 125

June 10, 1964

March 28, 1968

January 16, 1972

November 3, 1975

August 22, 1979
127 129 131 133 135

June 11, 1983

March 29, 1987

January 15, 1991

November 3, 1994

August 22, 1998
137 139 141 143 145

June 10, 2002

March 29, 2006

January 15, 2010

November 3, 2013

August 21, 2017
147 149 151 153 155

June 10, 2021

March 29, 2025

January 14, 2029

November 3, 2032

August 21, 2036

References

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  1. ^ "Spectacular Photos of Thursday's Solar Eclipse". The Weather Channel.
  2. ^ "Highlights From the 'Ring of Fire' Solar Eclipse at Sunrise". June 10, 2021 – via NYTimes.com.
  3. ^ Guenot, Marianne. "Stunning images show the rare solar eclipse that just partially obscured the sun across the Northern Hemisphere". Business Insider.
  4. ^ JavaScript Solar Eclipse Explorer - Europe (Latitude: 90° 00' 00" N. Longitude: 0° 00' 00" W). NASA
  5. ^ "NASA - Annular Solar Eclipse of 2021 June 10". eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov. Retrieved June 10, 2021.
  6. ^ "EclipseWise - Eclipses During 2021". www.eclipsewise.com. Retrieved June 10, 2021.
  7. ^ "Кольцеобразное солнечное затмение 10 июня 2021 года | Календарь наблюдателя | Meteoweb.ru". meteoweb.ru. Retrieved June 10, 2021.
  8. ^ van Gent, R.H. "Solar- and Lunar-Eclipse Predictions from Antiquity to the Present". A Catalogue of Eclipse Cycles. Utrecht University. Retrieved October 6, 2018.
  9. ^ "NASA - Catalog of Solar Eclipses of Saros 147". eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov.
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