Solar eclipse of May 10, 1994

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Solar eclipse of May 10, 1994
Solar Eclipse 1994 (7160293094).jpg
Partial from Bismarck, North Dakota, USA
SE1994May10A.png
Map
Type of eclipse
NatureAnnular
Gamma0.4077
Magnitude0.9431
Maximum eclipse
Duration373 sec (6 m 13 s)
Coordinates41°30′N 84°06′W / 41.5°N 84.1°W / 41.5; -84.1
Max. width of band230 km (140 mi)
Times (UTC)
Greatest eclipse17:12:27
References
Saros128 (57 of 73)
Catalog # (SE5000)9495

An annular solar eclipse occurred at the moon's descending node of the orbit on May 10, 1994. It was visible over a wide swath of North America, from Baja California across the Midwest of the United States up through Ontario and Nova Scotia in Canada. Occurring only 1.6 days after apogee (Perigee on May 9, 1994 at 02:18 UTC or May 8, 1994 at 22:18 EDT or 19:18 PDT), the moon's apparent diameter was smaller. This solar eclipse belonged to Saros series 128 because occurred at the Moon's descending node and 128 is an even number.

The Annular Eclipse of May 10, 1994[edit]

A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partly obscuring the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth. The eclipse is either total or annular. In a total eclipse, the moon's size from earth is large enough to block all of the disk of the sun.

An annular solar eclipse occurs when the Moon's apparent diameter is smaller than the Sun's, blocking most of the Sun's light and causing the Sun to look like an annulus (ring), that is there is a ring of the sun around the dark moon. An annular eclipse appears as a partial eclipse over a region of the Earth thousands of kilometres wide.

The path of annularity crossed four states of Mexico (Baja California Sur, Baja California, Sonora and Chihuahua), the United States, the Canadian provinces of Ontario, Nova Scotia and the southeastern tip of Quebec, Azores Islands except Santa Maria Island, and part of Morocco including the capital city Rabat. Niagara Falls was also covered by the path of annularity.

The eclipse reached its moment of "greatest eclipse" in the United States near Wauseon, Ohio, about 35 west of Toledo, Ohio.

Images[edit]

SE1994May10A.gif

Related eclipses[edit]

Eclipses of 1994[edit]

Solar eclipses 1993–1996[edit]

This eclipse is a member of a semester series. An eclipse in a semester series of solar eclipses repeats approximately every 177 days and 4 hours (a semester) at alternating nodes of the Moon's orbit.[1]

Solar eclipse series sets from 1993–1996
Descending node   Ascending node
Saros Map Gamma Saros Map Gamma
118 1993 May 21
SE1993May21P.png
Partial
1.13720 123 1993 November 13
SE1993Nov13P.png
Partial
-1.04114
128
Solar Eclipse 1994 (7160293094).jpg
Partial from Bismarck, ND
1994 May 10
SE1994May10A.png
Annular
0.40771 133
Diamond Ring, Total Solar Eclipse, Bolivia, 1994 (3183977692).jpg
Totality at Bolivia
1994 November 3
SE1994Nov03T.png
Total
-0.35216
138 1995 April 29
SE1995Apr29A.png
Annular
-0.33821 143
Hao WLCC 941103.jpg
Totality at Dundlod, India
1995 October 24
SE1995Oct24T.png
Total
0.35176
148 1996 April 17
SE1996Apr17P.png
Partial
-1.05796 153 1996 October 12
SE1996Oct12P.png
Partial
1.12265

Saros 128[edit]

This eclipse is a member of the Solar Saros cycle 128, which includes 73 eclipses occurring in intervals of 18 years and 11 days. The series started with partial solar eclipse on August 29, 984 AD. From May 16, 1417 through June 18, 1471 the series produced total solar eclipses, followed by hybrid solar eclipses from June 28, 1489 through July 31, 1543, and annular solar eclipses from August 11, 1561 through July 25, 2120. The series ends at member 73 as a partial eclipse on November 1, 2282. All eclipses in this series occurs at the Moon’s descending node.

Series members 52–68 occur between 1901 and 2200
52 53 54
SE1904Mar17A.png
March 17, 1904
SE1922Mar28A.png
March 28, 1922
SE1940Apr07A.png
April 7, 1940
55 56 57
SE1958Apr19A.png
April 19, 1958
SE1976Apr29A.png
April 29, 1976
SE1994May10A.png
May 10, 1994
58 59 60
SE2012May20A.png
May 20, 2012
SE2030Jun01A.png
June 1, 2030
SE2048Jun11A.png
June 11, 2048
61 62 63
SE2066Jun22A.png
June 22, 2066
SE2084Jul03A.png
July 3, 2084
SE2102Jul15A.png
July 15, 2102
64 65 66
SE2120Jul25A.png
July 25, 2120
August 5, 2138 (Partial) August 16, 2156 (Partial)
67 68
August 27, 2174 (Partial) September 6, 2192 (Partial)

Inex series[edit]

This eclipse is a part of the long period inex cycle, repeating at alternating nodes, every 358 synodic months (≈ 10,571.95 days, or 29 years minus 20 days). Their appearance and longitude are irregular due to a lack of synchronization with the anomalistic month (period of perigee). However, groupings of 3 inex cycles (≈ 87 years minus 2 months) comes close (≈ 1,151.02 anomalistic months), so eclipses are similar in these groupings.

Metonic cycle[edit]

The metonic series repeats eclipses every 19 years (6939.69 days), lasting about 5 cycles. Eclipses occur in nearly the same calendar date. In addition, the octon subseries repeats 1/5 of that or every 3.8 years (1387.94 days). All eclipses in this table occur at the Moon's descending node.

21 events between July 22, 1971 and July 22, 2047
July 21–22 May 9–11 February 26–27 December 14–15 October 2–3
106 108 110 112 114
July 21, 1952 May 10, 1956 February 26, 1960 December 16, 1963 October 3, 1967
116 118 120 122 124
SE1971Jul22P.png
July 22, 1971
SE1975May11P.png
May 11, 1975
SE1979Feb26T.png
February 26, 1979
SE1982Dec15P.png
December 15, 1982
SE1986Oct03H.png
October 3, 1986
126 128 130 132 134
SE1990Jul22T.png
July 22, 1990
SE1994May10A.png
May 10, 1994
SE1998Feb26T.png
February 26, 1998
SE2001Dec14A.png
December 14, 2001
SE2005Oct03A.png
October 3, 2005
136 138 140 142 144
SE2009Jul22T.png
July 22, 2009
SE2013May10A.png
May 10, 2013
SE2017Feb26A.png
February 26, 2017
SE2020Dec14T.png
December 14, 2020
SE2024Oct02A.png
October 2, 2024
146 148 150 152 154
SE2028Jul22T.png
July 22, 2028
SE2032May09A.png
May 9, 2032
SE2036Feb27P.png
February 27, 2036
SE2039Dec15T.png
December 15, 2039
SE2043Oct03A.png
October 3, 2043
156
SE2047Jul22P.png
July 22, 2047

References[edit]

  1. ^ van Gent, R.H. "Solar- and Lunar-Eclipse Predictions from Antiquity to the Present". A Catalogue of Eclipse Cycles. Utrecht University. Retrieved 6 October 2018.

External links[edit]

Photos: