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Solar eclipse of May 11, 2097

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Solar eclipse of May 11, 2097
Map
Type of eclipse
NatureTotal
Gamma0.8516
Magnitude1.0538
Maximum eclipse
Duration190 s (3 min 10 s)
Coordinates67°24′N 149°30′W / 67.4°N 149.5°W / 67.4; -149.5
Max. width of band339 km (211 mi)
Times (UTC)
Greatest eclipse
34:31
References
Saros149 (25 of 71)
Catalog # (SE5000)9726

A total solar eclipse will occur at the Moon's ascending node of orbit on Saturday, May 11, 2097, with a magnitude of 1.0538. A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partly obscuring the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth. A total solar eclipse occurs when the Moon's apparent diameter is larger than the Sun's, blocking all direct sunlight, turning day into darkness. Totality occurs in a narrow path across Earth's surface, with the partial solar eclipse visible over a surrounding region thousands of kilometres wide.

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Eclipses in 2097

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Metonic

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Tzolkinex

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Half-Saros

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Tritos

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Solar Saros 149

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Inex

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Triad

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Solar eclipses of 2094–2098

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This eclipse is a member of a semester series. An eclipse in a semester series of solar eclipses repeats approximately every 177 days and 4 hours (a semester) at alternating nodes of the Moon's orbit.[1]

The solar eclipses on January 16, 2094 (total) and July 12, 2094 (partial) occur in the previous lunar year eclipse set, and the partial solar eclipses on April 1, 2098 and September 25, 2098 occur in the next lunar year eclipse set.

Solar eclipse series sets from 2094 to 2098
Ascending node   Descending node
Saros Map Gamma Saros Map Gamma
119 June 13, 2094

Partial
−1.4613 124 December 7, 2094

Partial
1.1547
129 June 2, 2095

Total
−0.6396 134 November 27, 2095

Annular
0.4903
139 May 22, 2096

Total
0.1196 144 November 15, 2096

Annular
−0.20
149 May 11, 2097

Total
0.8516 154 November 4, 2097

Annular
−0.8926
159 May 1, 2098 164 October 24, 2098

Partial
−1.5407

Saros 149

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This eclipse is a part of Saros series 149, repeating every 18 years, 11 days, and containing 71 events. The series started with a partial solar eclipse on August 21, 1664. It contains total eclipses from April 9, 2043 through October 2, 2331; hybrid eclipses from October 13, 2349 through November 3, 2385; and annular eclipses from November 15, 2403 through July 13, 2800. The series ends at member 71 as a partial eclipse on September 28, 2926. Its eclipses are tabulated in three columns; every third eclipse in the same column is one exeligmos apart, so they all cast shadows over approximately the same parts of the Earth.

The longest duration of totality will be produced by member 31 at 4 minutes, 10 seconds on July 17, 2205, and the longest duration of annularity will be produced by member 62 at 5 minutes, 6 seconds on June 21, 2764. All eclipses in this series occur at the Moon’s ascending node of orbit.[2]

Series members 9–30 occur between 1801 and 2200:
9 10 11

November 18, 1808

November 29, 1826

December 9, 1844
12 13 14

December 21, 1862

December 31, 1880

January 11, 1899
15 16 17

January 23, 1917

February 3, 1935

February 14, 1953
18 19 20

February 25, 1971

March 7, 1989

March 19, 2007
21 22 23

March 29, 2025

April 9, 2043

April 20, 2061
24 25 26

May 1, 2079

May 11, 2097

May 24, 2115
27 28 29

June 3, 2133

June 14, 2151

June 25, 2169
30

July 6, 2187

Tritos series

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This eclipse is a part of a tritos cycle, repeating at alternating nodes every 135 synodic months (≈ 3986.63 days, or 11 years minus 1 month). Their appearance and longitude are irregular due to a lack of synchronization with the anomalistic month (period of perigee), but groupings of 3 tritos cycles (≈ 33 years minus 3 months) come close (≈ 434.044 anomalistic months), so eclipses are similar in these groupings.

Series members between 1801 and 2200

August 28, 1802
(Saros 122)

July 27, 1813
(Saros 123)

June 26, 1824
(Saros 124)

May 27, 1835
(Saros 125)

April 25, 1846
(Saros 126)

March 25, 1857
(Saros 127)

February 23, 1868
(Saros 128)

January 22, 1879
(Saros 129)

December 22, 1889
(Saros 130)

November 22, 1900
(Saros 131)

October 22, 1911
(Saros 132)

September 21, 1922
(Saros 133)

August 21, 1933
(Saros 134)

July 20, 1944
(Saros 135)

June 20, 1955
(Saros 136)

May 20, 1966
(Saros 137)

April 18, 1977
(Saros 138)

March 18, 1988
(Saros 139)

February 16, 1999
(Saros 140)

January 15, 2010
(Saros 141)

December 14, 2020
(Saros 142)

November 14, 2031
(Saros 143)

October 14, 2042
(Saros 144)

September 12, 2053
(Saros 145)

August 12, 2064
(Saros 146)

July 13, 2075
(Saros 147)

June 11, 2086
(Saros 148)

May 11, 2097
(Saros 149)

April 11, 2108
(Saros 150)

March 11, 2119
(Saros 151)

February 8, 2130
(Saros 152)

January 8, 2141
(Saros 153)

December 8, 2151
(Saros 154)

November 7, 2162
(Saros 155)

October 7, 2173
(Saros 156)

September 4, 2184
(Saros 157)

August 5, 2195
(Saros 158)

Metonic series

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The metonic series repeats eclipses every 19 years (6939.69 days), lasting about 5 cycles. Eclipses occur in nearly the same calendar date. In addition, the octon subseries repeats 1/5 of that or every 3.8 years (1387.94 days). All eclipses in this table occur at the Moon's ascending node.

21 eclipse events between July 23, 2036 and July 23, 2112
July 23–24 May 11 February 27–28 December 16–17 October 4–5
117 119 121 123 125

July 23, 2036

May 11, 2040

February 28, 2044

December 16, 2047

October 4, 2051
127 129 131 133 135

July 24, 2055

May 11, 2059

February 28, 2063

December 17, 2066

October 4, 2070
137 139 141 143 145

July 24, 2074

May 11, 2078

February 27, 2082

December 16, 2085

October 4, 2089
147 149 151 153 155

July 23, 2093

May 11, 2097

February 28, 2101

December 17, 2104

October 5, 2108
157

July 23, 2112

Notes

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  1. ^ van Gent, R.H. "Solar- and Lunar-Eclipse Predictions from Antiquity to the Present". A Catalogue of Eclipse Cycles. Utrecht University. Retrieved 6 October 2018.
  2. ^ "NASA - Catalog of Solar Eclipses of Saros 149". eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov.

References

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