Solar power in Austria

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

As of the end of 2014, solar power in Austria amounted to 766 megawatt (MW) of cumulative photovoltaic (PV) capacity, of which more than three quarters were installed within the last three years. Solar PV generated 766 gigawatt-hours, or about 1.4% of the country's final electricity consumption. As with most other European countries, 99.5 percent of all solar power systems are connected to the electrical grid. The nation's installed PV capacity by inhabitant (watt-peak per capita) stood at 91 watts, still below the European Union's 2014-average of 172 watts.[1]

Photovoltaic deployment in Austria had been rather modest for many years, while in other European countries, such as Germany, Italy and Spain, installations were booming with new records year after year. However, in an overall declining European solar market, annual PV deployment jumped beyond 100 megawatt in 2012 and remained above that level at 263 MW and 140 MW for 2013 and 2014, respectively. The European Photovoltaic Industry Association forecasts, that Austria, together with other mid-sized countries, will contribute significantly to European PV deployment in the coming years.[2]

In 2009, the site of Zwentendorf power station became Austria's largest solar power station with an investment of 1.2 million Euro, with the addition of 1,000 photovoltaic panels.[3] Zwentendorf was intended to be Austria's first nuclear power plant, but after a vote in 1978 prohibiting nuclear power in Austria, was never completed.[4] In September, 2011, Austria's largest solar power station, 2 MW, was under construction in the Niedere Tauern mountain range.[5]

Austria has also a large capacity of solar heating at its disposal. With more than 3,500 MWthermal the country ranks second in the EU, only behind much larger Germany.[6]


Photovoltaic installations[edit]

From the IEA-PVPS report TRENDS 2014 in Photovoltaic Applications, p.23[7]

Austria’s support for PV relies on a mix of capped FiT and investment grants. Due to a cap on the tariffs, the development of

PV in Austria remained quite low, with a market below 100 MW until 2011. With 176 MW in 2012 and 263 MW in 2013, the market progressed faster. Off-grid development amounted to 0,5 MW installed in 2013. Systems below 5 kW are incentivized through a financial incentive that can be increased for BIPV installations. Above 5 kW, the Green Electricity Act provides a FiT that was reduced in 2013. The FiT is guaranteed during 13 years and financed by a contribution of electricity consumers. Some financial grants can be added for specific buildings. In addition to federal incentives, most provinces are providing additional incentives through investment subsidies. Self-consumption is allowed for all systems. Self-consumption fees have to be paid if the self consumption is higher than 25 000 kWh/y. Rural electrification in remote areas not connected to the grid is incentivized through an investment subsidy up to 35% of the cost.

Statistics[edit]

Added Capacity since 1992 in (MWp)
50
100
150
200
250
300
1994
1998
2002
2006
2010
2014
Cumulative Capacity since 1992 in (MWp)
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
800
1994
1998
2002
2006
2010
2014
Austria 2013 - key figures
Final Electricity Consumption 56 TWh
Inhabitants 8 million
Irradiation 1,027 kWh/kW
PV Installations in 2013 263 MW
PV Cumulative Capacity in 2013 626 MW
PV Penetration 1.1%
Source: IEA-PVPS, Trends2014[7]
Photovoltaic installations in Austria since 1999
Year Added
(MWp)
Cumulative
(MWp)
Refs
1999 0.8 3.7 Trends2013
2000 1.2 4.9 Trends2013
2001 1.6 6.5 Trends2013
2002 3.8 10.3 Trends2013
2003 6.5 16.8 Trends2013
2004 4.3 21.1 Trends2013
2005 2.9 24.0 Trends2013
2006 1.6 25.6 Trends2013
2007 3.1 28.7 Trends2013
2008 3.7 32.4 Trends2013
2009 20.2 52.6 Trends2013
2010 42.9 95.5 Trends2013
2011 91.7 187.2 Trends2013
2012 176 362.9 Trends2013
2013 263 626 Trends2014
2014 140 766 Snapshot2014
Source: IEA-PVPS, Trends2013,[8] Trends2014,[7] Snapshot2014[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ EUROBSER'VER (April 2015). "Photovoltaic Barometer - installations 2013 and 2014" (PDF). http://www.energies-renouvelables.org. Archived from the original on 6 May 2015.  External link in |website= (help)
  2. ^ "Global Market Outlook for Photovoltaics 2014-2018". www.epia.org. EPIA - European Photovoltaic Industry Association. pp. 21, 24, 27, 31. Archived from the original (PDF) on 12 June 2014. Retrieved 12 June 2014. 
  3. ^ History
  4. ^ Austrian Nuclear Plant Becomes Solar Power Station
  5. ^ Albasolar provides 2MW for the largest solar Park in Austria
  6. ^ EurObserv'ER: Solar thermal and concentrated solar power barometer - May 2014
  7. ^ "Snapshot of Global PV 1992-2014" (PDF). http://www.iea-pvps.org/index.php?id=32. International Energy Agency — Photovoltaic Power Systems Programme. 30 March 2015. Archived from the original on 30 March 2015.  External link in |website= (help)

External links[edit]