Solar power in New Hampshire

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Exeter High School 98 kW solar array[1]

Solar power in New Hampshire provides a small percentage of the state's electricity. State renewable requirements and declining prices have led to some installations. Photovoltaics on rooftops can provide 53.4% of all electricity used in New Hampshire, from 5,300 MW of solar panels, and 72% of the electricity used in Concord, New Hampshire.[2] A 2016 estimate suggests that a typical 5 kW system costing $25,000 before credits and utility savings will pay for itself in 9 years, and generate a profit of $34,196 over the rest of its 25-year life. A loan or lease provides a net savings each year, including the first year.[3] New Hampshire has a rebate program which pays $0.75/W for residential systems up to 5 kW, for up to 50% of the system cost, up to $3,750.[4] However, New Hampshire's solar installation lagged behind nearby states such as Vermont and New York, which in 2013 had 10 times and 25 times more solar, respectively.

Net metering is available for up to 1 MW generation, but is capped at 50 MW. Excess generation is perpetually rolled over each month, and customers can elect to be paid at avoided cost once a year.[5] The organization Freeing the Grid gave the state a B for net metering and a D for interconnection.[6] The state renewable portfolio standard calls for 25% of electricity from renewable energy in 2025, including 0.3% from solar.[7] Noncompliance fees are used to fund renewable energy, and resulted in payments of $1.3 million in 2009[8] and $2.6 million in 2010.[9] A 2014 review by the state found the "business-as-usual" model predicted that the state's 2025 goals would not be met.[10]

In 2005, New Hampshire's largest solar array was the 50 kW installation on the roof of the Stonyfield Farm yogurt factory.[11] It remained the largest in the state until PSNH installed a 51 kW array on their roof in 2009.[12] In 2012, New Hampshire's largest solar array was the 525 kW facility on the top level of the Manchester Airport parking garage.[13] It was removed because of glare, and reinstalled with the panels facing East instead of South. Additional panels were installed to maintain the same output.[14]

Manchester Airport Solar Generation (kWh) [15]
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec Total
2016 29,325 36,690 55,281 68,395 71,776 86,272 347,739
Total 347,739

In 2015, the largest solar farm in the state was at the Peterborough wastewater treatment plant, a 942 kW installation with 3,100 solar panels on 5 acres (2.0 ha).[16][17]

In a pilot program, a solar panel was installed on a few utility poles, four in Nashua and four in Berlin.[18]

New Hampshire's average electricity price of 16.47¢/kWh is the sixth highest in the country.[19]

Installed capacity[edit]

Source: NREL[20]
Grid-Connected PV Capacity (MW)[21][22][23][24][25][26][27][28][29]
Year Capacity Installed % Change
2007 0.1
2008 0.1
2009 0.7 0.5 600%
2010 2.0 1.3 186%
2011 3.1 1.0 55%
2012 5.4 2.3 74%
2013 9.6 4.1 75%
2014 7 3 75%
2015 22 15 214%

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Exeter Region High School
  2. ^ Rooftop Solar Photovoltaic Technical Potential in the United States: A Detailed Assessment
  3. ^ New Hampshire
  4. ^ Renewable Energy Rebate Program
  5. ^ New Hampshire Net Metering
  6. ^ Freeing the grid
  7. ^ Renewables Portfolio Standard
  8. ^ Annual RPS Compliance Report for 2009
  9. ^ Annual RPS Compliance Report for 2010
  10. ^ New Hampshire 10 Year Energy Strategy, New Hampshire Office of Energy and Planning, September 2014
  11. ^ Stonyfield Farm Solar Array
  12. ^ Solar at Energy Park
  13. ^ Project Experience: Manchester Airport Solar Project, New Hampshire
  14. ^ Manchester airport remains in dark over solar-panel glare solution
  15. ^ "Parking Garage Solar PV Facilty". Vale Clean Technology. Retrieved March 22, 2016. 
  16. ^ Peterborough to turn on state's largest solar-power facility, Concord Monitor, November 6, 2015
  17. ^ Solar Powered WWTP
  18. ^ Solar on Utility Poles
  19. ^ Residential Electricity Prices, April 2012 (cents/kWh)
  20. ^ "PV Watts". NREL. Retrieved 23 July 2012. 
  21. ^ Sherwood, Larry (August 2012). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2011" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). p. 17. Retrieved 2012-08-16. 
  22. ^ Sherwood, Larry (June 2011). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2010" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). Retrieved 2011-06-29. 
  23. ^ Sherwood, Larry (July 2010). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2009" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). Retrieved 2010-07-28. 
  24. ^ Sherwood, Larry (July 2009). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2008" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). Retrieved 2010-07-24. 
  25. ^ Sherwood, Larry (August 2008). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2007" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). Retrieved 2010-07-24. 
  26. ^ Sherwood, Larry (July 2009). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2008" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). p. 16. Retrieved 2010-07-24. 
  27. ^ Sherwood, Larry (July 2012). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2012" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). p. 16. Retrieved 2013-10-11. 
  28. ^ Sherwood, Larry (July 2014). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2013" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). Retrieved 2014-09-26. 
  29. ^ New Hampshire Solar

External links[edit]