Sollas

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Sollas
Struan cottage - geograph.org.uk - 76275.jpg
Struan cottage. A traditional thatched cottage in Sollas, seen in 2002 and since restored.
GLAZL GBNHG atSollas.jpg
Highland Aviation aircraft at Tràigh Ear, Sollas, in 2011
Sollas is located in Outer Hebrides
Sollas
Sollas
Sollas shown within the Outer Hebrides
Language Scottish Gaelic
English
OS grid reference NF812747
Civil parish
Council area
Lieutenancy area
Country Scotland
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town ISLE OF NORTH UIST
Postcode district HS6
Dialling code 01876
Police Scottish
Fire Scottish
Ambulance Scottish
EU Parliament Scotland
UK Parliament
Scottish Parliament
List of places
UK
Scotland
57°39′00″N 7°20′42″W / 57.650°N 7.345°W / 57.650; -7.345Coordinates: 57°39′00″N 7°20′42″W / 57.650°N 7.345°W / 57.650; -7.345

Sollas (Scottish Gaelic: Solas) is a small crofting township on the northern coast of the island of North Uist, Scotland.

From Sollas, the road that heads towards Bayhead is known as the Committee Road. It is called this as it was organised by a committee charged with providing famine relief in the 1840s. The Battle of Sollas took place in 1849 during the time of the clearances [1][2][3]

Today, the village of Sollas has a local supermarket and the old school building has been turned into a community centre - Taigh Sgire Sholais.[4][5] Every July, the residents of Sollas host a series of events known as Sollas Week. Sollas is situated in the parish of North Uist,[6] and the people are almost entirely Protestant.

The Battle of Sollas is featured in the novel The False Men by Mhairead MacLeod.[7]

Sollas beach is featured in the novel The Chessmen by Peter May.[8] Northern & Scottish Airways inaugurated services to Sollas in February 1936, using beach and the machair (on which it laid out two grass runways, a hangar and a fuel depot). Services continued until British European Airways retired its De Havilland Rapides in the 1950s. The beach at Tràigh Ear continues to be used infrequently by light aircraft.[9][10] Highland Aviation uses the beach for its beach landing training course, along with Traigh Mhòr beach at Barra (the site of Barra Airport).[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Napier Commission in the Outer Hebrides: North Uist, 30 May 1883 - John Morrison". napier-outerhebrides.blogspot.co.uk. Retrieved 2016-06-20. 
  2. ^ Craig, David. On the Crofter's Trail. 
  3. ^ Craig, David (2013-05-13). On the Crofter's Trail. Birlinn. ISBN 9780857905963. 
  4. ^ "Solas Co-op Store". Geograph Britain and Ireland. Retrieved 19 December 2014. 
  5. ^ "Solas Primary School". Geograph Britain and Ireland. Retrieved 19 December 2014. 
  6. ^ "North Uist, Middlequarter". Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland. Retrieved 19 December 2014. 
  7. ^ Munro, Alistair; (2 August 2017). "Traumatic story of the Hebridean Clearances retold". The Scotsman. Retrieved 28 May 2018. 
  8. ^ "Peter May Trilogy - Sollas Beach". Visit Outer Hebrides. Retrieved 19 December 2014. 
  9. ^ "Sollas". UK Airports and Airfields. Retrieved 21 November 2016. 
  10. ^ "Sollas Airfield". UKGA. Retrieved 21 November 2016. 
  11. ^ "Beach landing course". Highland Aviation. Retrieved 21 November 2016. 

External links[edit]