Sonia Lafuente

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Sonia Lafuente
Sonia LAFUENTE NebelhornTrophy 2009.jpg
Lafuente in 2009
Personal information
Full name Sonia Lafuente Martínez
Country represented Spain
Born (1991-12-07) 7 December 1991 (age 24)
Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Canary Islands
Height 1.60 m (5 ft 3 in)
Coach Ghisland Briand, Tracy Wilson
Former coach Brian Orser, Ivan Saez, Carolina Sanz, Jordi Lafarga
Choreographer David Wilson, Jeffrey Buttle
Former choreographer Romain Haguenauer, Ivan Saez
Skating club Sad Majadahonda
Former skating club Club Hielo Igloo Madrid
Training locations Toronto
Former training locations Madrid, Canillo, Lyon
Began skating 1995
ISU personal best scores
Combined total 152.29
2013 European
Short program 52.44
2013 World
Free skate 101.22
2013 European
This name uses Spanish naming customs: the first or paternal family name is Lafuente and the second or maternal family name is Martínez.

Sonia Lafuente Martínez (born 7 December 1991) is a Spanish figure skater. She is a three-time Spanish national champion. Lafuente became the first Spanish skater to medal on the ISU Junior Grand Prix circuit when she won silver at the 2006 Mexico Cup.[1]

Career[edit]

Lafuente began skating at age four, after her parents took her and her sister to a newly opened rink in Madrid. Carolina Sanz and Ivan Saez were her coaches for much of her career.[2] In the 2003–04 season, Lafuente made her international debut as a novice, and finished with the bronze medal at the Merano Cup, an event she would win one year later. She began competing in junior internationals in 2005-06.

In the 2006–07 season, Lafuente became the first Spanish skater to win a Junior Grand Prix medal. She trained mainly in Majadahonda.[3]

In 2008, Lafuente made her debut at the European Championships. She was 30th at her first Senior Worlds. The next season, she finished 23rd at Europeans and 26th at Worlds, which did not qualify her for the 2010 Winter Olympics. However, she was able to qualify for the Olympics with an 8th-place finish at the 2009 Nebelhorn Trophy, and finished 22nd in Vancouver. The next season, she received her first Grand Prix assignments, and finished 10th and 7th, respectively, at the 2010 Skate Canada International and the 2010 Trophee Eric Bompard. She was 12th at the European Championships but did not qualify for the free skate at Worlds.

Lafuente was 9th at the 2011 Nebelhorn Trophy, 7th at the 2011 Trophee Eric Bompard, 5th at the 2011 Golden Spin of Zagreb, and 15th at the 2012 European Championships in Sheffield.

Lafuente finished 7th at the 2013 European Championships and earned the minimum score to compete at the 2013 World Championships where she was 22nd.

The 2013 Nebelhorn Trophy was the last opportunity to qualify for the 2014 Winter Olympics. Lafuente was unable to win one of the six available ladies' berths, finishing 26th. In October 2013, she decided to move to Toronto, Ontario, Canada to train in Brian Orser's group.[4][5] In 2014, she began working with Ghisland Briand and Tracy Wilson as her coaches.[6]

After the 2016 European Championships, in which she finished 33th, Sonia decided to retired of competition for a year.

Personal life[edit]

Lafuente is a university student, studying sports. She intends to spread her studies over several years in order to accommodate her career.[2]

Programs[edit]

Season Short program Free skating
2014-2015
[6]
2013–2014
[7]
2012–2013
[8]
  • Romeo and Juliet
    (musical soundtrack)
2011–2012
[1][9][10]
  • Cry me a River

2010–2011
[11]
2009–2010
[12]
  • Libertango
    by Astor Piazzolla
  • Orobroy
    by David Pena
  • Poeta
    by Vincente Amigo
2008–2009
[13]
  • Nocturne
    by Frédéric Chopin
  • Orobroy
    by David Pena
  • Poeta
    by Vincente Amigo
2007–2008
[14]
2006–2007
[15]
  • Arabesque
    by James Birkin
  • Concerto Per Il Tuo Ricordo
    by Osvaldo Camahue
2005–2006
[16]
  • Poeta
    by Vicente Amigo
  • Night on Bald Mountain
    by Modest Mussorgski

Competitive highlights[edit]

GP: Grand Prix; CS: Challenger Series (began in the 2014–15 season); JGP: Junior Grand Prix

2005–present[edit]

International[17]
Event 2005–06 2006–07 2007–08 2008–09 2009–10 2010–11 2011–12 2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Olympics 22nd
Worlds 30th 26th 20th 25th 15th 22nd 32nd
Europeans 20th 23rd 17th 12th 15th 7th 28th 18th 33rd
GP Bompard 7th 7th
GP Skate Canada 10th
CS Autumn Classic 7th
CS Golden Spin 10th 12th
(non-CS) Golden Spin 1st 5th
(non-CS) Autumn Classic 9th
Challenge Cup 4th
Cup of Nice 4th J. 5th WD
Dragon Trophy 1st
Finlandia 7th
Open d'Andorra 1st
Merano Cup 1st J. 6th
Nebelhorn 8th 9th 26th
NRW Trophy 5th 10th
Volvo Cup 5th
Universiade 2nd 15th 8th
International: Junior[17]
Junior Worlds 30th 14th 12th 20th
JGP Andorra 12th
JGP Austria 20th
JGP France 5th
JGP Mexico 2nd
JGP Poland 23rd
JGP S. Africa 6th
JGP Spain 9th
JGP Turkey 13th
JGP U.K. 3rd
EYOF 1st J.
National[17]
Spanish Champ. 1st 1st J. 1st J. 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 3rd
WD = Withdrew
GP = Grand Prix; CS = Challenger Series; JGP = Junior Grand Prix
J. = Junior level

Novice career[edit]

International
Event 2002–03 2003–04 2004–05
Merano Cup 3rd N. 1st N.
Copenhagen Trophy 6th N.
National
Spanish Champ. 1st N. 1st N.
Levels: N. = Novice; J. = Junior

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Sonia LAFUENTE: 2011/2012". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 23 December 2011. 
  2. ^ a b Jangbro, Eva Maria; Halonen, Lena (15 November 2011). "Sonia Lafuente: "It would be a pleasure to try to make the sport bigger in Spain."". Absolute Skating. 
  3. ^ "ENTREVISTA A SONIA LAFUENTE" [Interview with Sonia Lafuente]. Hielo Español (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 9 June 2013. 
  4. ^ "Sonia Lafuente abandona España para trabajar con el entrenador de Javier Fernández" [Sonia Lafuente leaves Spain to train with Javier Fernandez' coach]. EFE (in Spanish) (20minutos.es). 9 October 2013. Archived from the original on 5 December 2013. 
  5. ^ "Sonia Lafuente entrenará con Brian Orser" [Sonia Lafuente will train with Brian Orser]. Hielo Español (in Spanish). 9 October 2013. Archived from the original on 5 December 2013. 
  6. ^ a b "Ladies". ISU Results. ISU. Retrieved 27 September 2015. 
  7. ^ "Sonia LAFUENTE: 2013/2014". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 5 December 2013. 
  8. ^ "Sonia LAFUENTE: 2012/2013". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 22 September 2013. 
  9. ^ "Sonia LAFUENTE: 2011/2012". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 18 September 2012. 
  10. ^ "SONIA LAFUENTE CAMBIA SU PROGRAMA LARGO" [Sonia Lafuente changes her long program]. Hielo Español (in Spanish). 12 December 2011. Archived from the original on 5 December 2013. 
  11. ^ "Sonia LAFUENTE: 2010/2011". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 19 July 2011. 
  12. ^ "Sonia LAFUENTE: 2009/2010". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 5 May 2010. 
  13. ^ "Sonia LAFUENTE: 2008/2009". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 31 May 2009. 
  14. ^ "Sonia LAFUENTE: 2007/2008". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 26 May 2008. 
  15. ^ "Sonia LAFUENTE: 2006/2007". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 16 April 2007. 
  16. ^ "Sonia LAFUENTE: 2005/2006". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 23 May 2006. 
  17. ^ a b c "Competition Results: Sonia LAFUENTE". International Skating Union. 

External links[edit]

Media related to Sonia Lafuente at Wikimedia Commons