Sony Open in Hawaii

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"Sony Open" redirects here. For the tennis tournament currently sponsored by Sony, see Miami Masters.
Sony Open in Hawaii
Sony Open in Hawaii.svg
Tournament information
Location Honolulu, Hawaii, U.S.
Established 1965
Course(s) Waialae Country Club
Par 70
Length 7,044 yards (6,441 m)
Organized by Friends of Hawaii Charities
Tour(s) PGA Tour
Format Stroke play
Prize fund $5,800,000
Month played January
Tournament record score
Aggregate 256 Russell Henley (2013)
To par −28 John Huston (1998)
Current champion
Argentina Fabián Gómez
Waialae is located in Hawaii
Waialae
Waialae
Location in the United States

The Sony Open in Hawaii is a professional golf tournament on the PGA Tour, and is part of the tour's FedEx Cup Series. It has been contested at the Waialae Country Club in Honolulu, Hawaii since the event's modern-day inception as the Hawaiian Open in 1965. Starting in 1971, the tournament was held in either January or February. Currently, it is held in January and is the first full-field event of the calendar year. The front and back nines are switched for the PGA Tour event, finishing at the dogleg #9.[1]

The first lead sponsor was United Airlines in 1991, succeeded by current sponsor Sony in 1999. There have been five multiple winners of the tournament, all two-time champions: Hubert Green, Corey Pavin, Lanny Wadkins, Ernie Els, and Jimmy Walker. All have won major championships. The tournament is currently organized by Friends of Hawaii Charities.[2]

In addition to the usual PGA Tour eligibility criteria, the Sony Open may invite up to three professional golfers from emerging markets.[3]

Notable appearances[edit]

Isao Aoki[edit]

In 1983, Isao Aoki became Japan's first winner on the PGA Tour. He holed out a wedge shot for an eagle-3 on the 72nd hole to beat Jack Renner by a stroke.

Tadd Fujikawa[edit]

In the 2007 Sony Open, at the age of 16 years and 4 days, amateur Tadd Fujikawa become the second youngest player ever to make a 36-hole cut in an official PGA Tour event.[4] His achievement was highlighted by a 15-foot eagle putt on his 36th hole, Waialae's 551-yard par-5 18th. Incidentally, the 2006 PGA Tour Media Guide says that the youngest player ever to make a 36-hole cut in an official Tour event was Bob Panasik (15 years, 8 months and 20 days) at the 1957 Canadian Open.

Michelle Wie[edit]

The Sony Open gained attention for granting four consecutive sponsor invitations (PGA Tour Exemption #11) to teenage female golfer Michelle Wie, the first in 2004 when she was age 14. She missed the cut in all four appearances and did not receive one of the four available sponsor exemptions in 2008. One of the invitations went to Alex Ching, a 17-year-old former high school classmate of Wie.

Winners[edit]

Year Player Country Score To par Margin
of victory
Runner(s)-up 1st prize
($)
Sony Open in Hawaii
2016 Fabián Gómez  Argentina 260 −20 Playoff United States Brandt Snedeker 1,044,000
2015 Jimmy Walker (2)  United States 257 −23 9 strokes United States Scott Piercy 1,008,000
2014 Jimmy Walker  United States 263 −17 1 stroke United States Chris Kirk 1,008,000
2013 Russell Henley  United States 256 −24 3 strokes South Africa Tim Clark 1,008,000
2012 Johnson Wagner  United States 267 −13 2 strokes United States Harrison Frazar
United States Charles Howell III
United States Sean O'Hair
Sweden Carl Pettersson
990,000
2011 Mark Wilson  United States 264 −16 2 strokes South Africa Tim Clark
United States Steve Marino
990,000
2010 Ryan Palmer  United States 265 −15 1 stroke Australia Robert Allenby 990,000
2009 Zach Johnson  United States 265 −15 2 strokes Australia Adam Scott
United States David Toms
972,000
2008 K. J. Choi  South Korea 266 −14 3 strokes South Africa Rory Sabbatini 954,000
2007 Paul Goydos  United States 266 −14 1 stroke England Luke Donald
United States Charles Howell III
936,000
2006 David Toms  United States 261 −19 5 strokes United States Chad Campbell
South Africa Rory Sabbatini
918,000
2005 Vijay Singh  Fiji 269 −11 1 stroke South Africa Ernie Els 864,000
2004 Ernie Els (2)  South Africa 262 −18 Playoff United States Harrison Frazar 864,000
2003 Ernie Els  South Africa 264 −16 Playoff Australia Aaron Baddeley 810,000
2002 Jerry Kelly  United States 266 −14 1 stroke United States John Cook 720,000
2001 Brad Faxon  United States 260 −20 4 strokes United States Tom Lehman 720,000
2000 Paul Azinger  United States 261 −19 7 strokes Australia Stuart Appleby 522,000
1999 Jeff Sluman  United States 271 −9 2 strokes United States Davis Love III
United States Jeff Maggert
United States Len Mattiace
United States Chris Perry
United States Tommy Tolles
468,000
United Airlines Hawaiian Open
1998 John Huston  United States 260 −28 7 strokes United States Tom Watson 324,000
1997 Paul Stankowski  United States 271 −17 Playoff United States Jim Furyk
United States Mike Reid
216,000
1996 Jim Furyk  United States 277 −11 Playoff United States Brad Faxon 216,000
1995 John Morse  United States 269 −19 3 strokes United States Tom Lehman
United States Duffy Waldorf
216,000
1994 Brett Ogle  Australia 269 −19 1 stroke United States Davis Love III 216,000
1993 Howard Twitty  United States 269 −19 4 strokes United States Joey Sindelar 216,000
1992 John Cook  United States 265 −23 2 strokes United States Paul Azinger 216,000
United Hawaiian Open
1991 Lanny Wadkins (2)  United States 270 −18 4 strokes United States John Cook 198,000
Hawaiian Open
1990 David Ishii  United States 279 −9 1 stroke United States Paul Azinger 180,000
1989 Gene Sauers  United States 197 −19 1 stroke United States David Ogrin 135,000
1988 Lanny Wadkins  United States 271 −17 1 stroke Canada Richard Zokol 108,000
1987 Corey Pavin (2)  United States 270 −18 Playoff United States Craig Stadler 108,000
1986 Corey Pavin  United States 272 −16 2 strokes United States Paul Azinger 90,000
1985 Mark O'Meara  United States 267 −21 1 stroke United States Craig Stadler 90,000
1984 Jack Renner  United States 271 −17 Playoff United States Wayne Levi 90,000
1983 Isao Aoki  Japan 268 −20 1 stroke United States Jack Renner 58,500
1982 Wayne Levi  United States 277 −11 1 stroke United States Scott Simpson 58,500
1981 Hale Irwin  United States 265 −23 6 strokes United States Don January 58,500
1980 Andy Bean  United States 266 −22 3 strokes United States Lee Trevino 58,500
1979 Hubert Green (2)  United States 267 −21 3 strokes United States Fuzzy Zoeller 54,000
1978 Hubert Green  United States 274 −14 Playoff United States Billy Kratzert 50,000
1977 Bruce Lietzke  United States 273 −15 3 strokes United States Don January
Japan Takashi Murakami
48,000
1976 Ben Crenshaw  United States 270 −18 4 strokes United States Hale Irwin
United States Larry Nelson
46,000
1975 Gary Groh  United States 274 −14 1 stroke United States Al Geiberger 44,000
1974 Jack Nicklaus  United States 271 −17 3 strokes United States Eddie Pearce 44,000
1973 John Schlee  United States 273 −15 2 strokes United States Orville Moody 40,000
1972 Grier Jones  United States 274 −14 Playoff United States Bob Murphy 40,000
1971 Tom Shaw  United States 273 −15 1 stroke United States Miller Barber 40,000
1970 No tournament
1969 Bruce Crampton  Australia 274 −14 4 strokes United States Jack Nicklaus 25,000
1968 Lee Trevino  United States 272 −16 2 strokes United States George Archer 25,000
1967 Dudley Wysong  United States 284 −4 Playoff United States Billy Casper 20,000
1966 Ted Makalena  United States 271 −17 3 strokes United States Billy Casper
United States Gay Brewer
8,500
1965 Gay Brewer  United States 281 −7 Playoff United States Bob Goalby 9,000

Note: Green highlight indicates scoring records.

Previous incarnations recognized by PGA Tour
Year Player Country Score To par 1st prize
($)
1948 Cary Middlecoff  United States 274 −10 2,000
1947 E.J. "Dutch" Harrison  United States 275 −13 2,000
1929 Craig Wood  United States 289 +1 1,600
1928 Bill Mehlhorn  United States 291

Multiple winners[edit]

Five men have won this tournament more than once through 2016.

Records[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Waialae Country Club – Course Tour". Retrieved January 9, 2013. 
  2. ^ Sony Open In Hawaii - Charity
  3. ^ "2015–16 PGA Tour Player Handbook & Tournament Regulations" (PDF). October 5, 2015. 
  4. ^ "Finally The Teenager Makes a Cut". Golf Channel. Associated Press. January 12, 2007. Retrieved January 9, 2013. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 21°16′19″N 157°46′30″W / 21.272°N 157.775°W / 21.272; -157.775