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Soulmate

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A soulmate is a person with whom one has a feeling of deep or natural affinity.[1] This may involve similarity, love, romance, platonic relationships, comfort, intimacy, sexuality, sexual activity, spirituality, compatibility and trust.[2]

Definition

In current usage, "soulmate" usually refers to a romantic or platonic partner, with the implication of an exclusive lifelong bond.[3] It commonly holds the connotation of being the strongest bond with another person[4] that one can achieve. It is commonly accepted that one will feel 'complete' once they have found their soulmate, as it is partially in the perceived definition that two souls are meant to unite.[citation needed] The term "soulmate" first appeared in the English language in a letter by Samuel Taylor Coleridge in 1822.[citation needed]

Criticism

Some psychologists state that believing that a soulmate exists specifically for a person is an unrealistic expectation.[4][5][6]

Historical usages of the concept

Theosophy

According to the esoteric religious movement Theosophy, whose claims were modified by Edgar Cayce, God created androgynous souls—equally male and female. Later theories postulate that the souls split into separate genders, perhaps because they incurred karma while playing around on the Earth, or "separation from God." Over a number of reincarnations, each half seeks the other. When all karmic debt is purged, the two will fuse back together and return to the ultimate.[7][8][better source needed]

New Age

According to Mark L. Prophet and Elizabeth Clare Prophet, a soulmate is a separate entity with whom one has spent many lifetimes as a friend, lover, co-worker or partner, and to whom one is usually drawn to fulfill a specific mission.[9] They describe a soulmate as one of many potential spiritual brothers or sisters: "even though there may be a great attraction and bond between soulmates, fundamentally, in the ultimate sense, you could define it more as a brother/sister relationship, even though soulmates have great marriages and a great union of hearts."[10] According to Mark Prophet: "A soulmate relationship has to do with the seat of the soul Chandra, that Chandra just above the base ... The connection is one of parallel and mutual evolution rather than origin."[10]

Tarot

In tarot card meaning, the concept of a soulmate is loosely implied to be a person with whom your souls are tied by consensual intercourse. Since in divination it is believed that two persons acquire a shared fate once they have sex, it becomes possible for someone to have various 'soulmates' (even simultaneously) as read in a tarot card spread.

See also

References

  1. ^ Patrick Hanks, ed. (1985). Collins English Dictionary. William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. p. 1390.
  2. ^ Eddie Chandler (2006-02-01). "Do Soul Mates Exist? - AskMen". Uk.askmen.com. Archived from the original on 2015-10-22. Retrieved 2015-10-22.
  3. ^ "Soul mate - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary". Merriam-webster.com. 2012-08-31. Archived from the original on 2013-10-16. Retrieved 2013-08-24.
  4. ^ a b "soulmate". Natural Health Magazine. Archived from the original on 2013-11-09. Retrieved 2013-09-16.
  5. ^ Springer, Shauna (2012-07-28). "Soul Mates Do Exist—Just Not In the Way We Usually Think". Psychology Today. Retrieved 2013-08-24.
  6. ^ Auzeen, Goal (2012-06-06). "Do Soulmates Exist?". Psychology Today. Retrieved 2013-08-24.
  7. ^ Krajenke, Robert W. (1972). Suddenly We Were!: a Story of Creation Based on the Edgar Cayce Readings. A.R.E. Press.
  8. ^ "What is a Twin Flame?". Soulevolution.org. Archived from the original on 2007-12-12. Retrieved 2007-12-21.
  9. ^ Elizabeth Clare Prophet, Soulmates and Twin Flames: The Spiritual Dimension of Love and Relationships. Summit University Press, 1998.
  10. ^ a b Prophet, Mark and Elizabeth, The Ascended Masters On Soulmates And Twin Flames: Initiation by the Great White Brotherhood: Volume 2. Summit University Press, 1988, pg 87-88.