South Australia Australian rules football team

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South Australia
Badge of South Australia team
Nickname The Croweaters
Governing body South Australian National Football League
Most caps Fos Williams, Walter Scott (34)
Home stadium AAMI Stadium (51,240)
Various SANFL grounds
First game
Victoria (Australia) Victoria 7–0 South Australia South Australia
1879

The South Australia Australian rules team, known as the "Croweaters", is the representative side of South Australia in the sport of Australian rules football.

South Australia has a proud history in interstate football, having a successful historical record and winning two out of the four Interstate Carnivals in the State of Origin era, including the last two.[1][2]

South Australia has an intense and long rivalry with Victoria.[3] The rivalry was characterised by the catchcry in South Australia called "Kick a Vic" and fans would bring signs of the cry to the games.[4] The South Australia and Victoria rivalry was characterised by long-time South Australian player Andrew Jarman, who has said "it was the mother of all battles".[5] Some of the games between South Australia, Victoria and Western Australia in the 1980s and 1990s have been described as "some of greatest games in the history of Australian football".[6]

The rivalry with Victoria stems from before State of Origin started, the Victorian Football League being the richest league, used to buy a lot of the best players from interstate, and the standard rules prior to 1977 was that all VFL players played interstate football for Victoria.[7] This contributed to Victoria's dominance in the pre-State of Origin era,[8] it created a culture of disdain towards Victoria.[9][10] Another component of the rivalry is a historical feeling in South Australia that Victoria doesn't rate any player or league outside Victoria.[11] Another contributing factor is a feeling in South Australia that Victorians think they own the game.[12]

History[edit]

The first game South Australia played was in the first intercolonial/interstate game in 1879 against Victoria. South Australia has played several games annually from 1879 till when interstate football ended in 1999. South Australia has also participated in every Australian National Football Carnival and always participated in section 1 when there were divisions.

The 1980s was a golden period for South Australia, winning the national championship three times, including an Interstate Carnival Championship.[13]

South Australia won the Interstate Carnival three times and came runner up another eight.

Honour of playing for South Australia[edit]

Many players have spoken of the honour of playing for South Australia. Graham Cornes has said when talking about being presented with the South Australian jumper "the pride of holding the jumper first I can't describe that", and has also said that "pulling the South Australian jumper on is like a dream come true".[14] Former South Australian and Carlton player Andrew McKay has stated "I never dreamt of playing VFL/AFL as a child, but I always dreamt of playing for my state". Neil Kerley has stated about playing for South Australia that "it was another level".[15] John Platten has been quoted as saying that "state jumpers have to be earned."[16]

Rivalries[edit]

Victoria[edit]

Although the rivalry with Western Australia is very strong, the rivalry between South Australia and Victoria is the strongest.[17]

Neil Kerley has stated that beating Victoria was the ultimate in football in South Australia. After stating that the interviewer said "you've got premierships as a player and coach", but Kerley followed up with "they were great" but continued to state it was the ultimate achievement.[18] Neil Kerley has also stated before an Interstate Carnival grand final with Victoria, that "I don't like the Victorians and I think the South Australians are every bit as good".[19]

Graham Cornes has stated about the rivalry with Victoria that "they don't rate anyone else, they don't regard, it's a lack of respect and appreciation". He then followed up saying "there've been some great footballers out of South Australia who are just unknown in Victoria".[20] He's also commented on Victoria taking South Australia's best footballers away and making them play for Victoria, stating "you even claimed Malcolm Blight as a Victorian, we never quite forgave you for that".[21] Cornes has also described the football culture in Victoria as insular, for their lack of regard for football outside their state.[22]

Garry Lyon has commented on games in South Australia versus Victoria, that fans in Adelaide absolutely loved those games, the fans in attendance were "hostile and maniacal", and "by the time the games came around they were whipped into a frenzy".[23]

Ben Hart has stated talking about South Australia playing Victoria saying,"the games against Victoria have always been such huge occasions for South Australians".[24]

Brett Chalmers was quoted saying before South Australia played Victoria in 1992, "I'd love to beat the Victorians, every South Australian doesn't like the Victorians, it'll be great to beat them".[25]

Paul Roos has described the first state game he played in South Australia saying "when walking up the entrance and onto Football Park was an experience in itself. I quickly realised how much hatered existed towards Victorians and their football.[26] He has also stated about State of Origin games versus South Australia, saying "from an early age I was glued to the television hoping Victoria would destroy South Australia".[27]

Western Australia[edit]

South Australia have an intense rivalry with Western Australia.[28] It has been described that South Australia likes to try and underline its authority over Western Australia and let it be known it's the more powerful football state of the pair.[29]

Fans at games between South Australia and Western Australia have been described as vociferous and parochial.[30] A game between Western Australia and South Australia in Adelaide has been described as parochialism raining.[31]


Notable State of Origin games[edit]

South Australia have been involved in some of the most notable games in the history of Australian football.[32] Here are some of them.

1993 South Australia 16.13.109 d Victoria 14.13.97: A close game at the MCG saw South Australia just get home in a game where Darren Jarman kicks six goals and Gary Ablett kicks five.

1992 South Australia 19.19 133 d Victoria 18.12.120: A game that Wayne Carey has described the reason he believed he could succeed in the AFL.[33] In a high scoring game, Stephen Kernahan kicks six goals, Paul Salmon kicks five, Paul Roos kicks three and Wayne Carey dominates at centre half forward, kicking two goals.[34] A classic where South Australia get home in the dying moments.

1984 Victoria 16.12.108 d South Australia 16.8.104: A packed house at Football Park set the stage for a thriller, in a game where Stephen Kernahan kicks ten goals, Paul Salmon kicks five and Peter Daicos kicks three.

1984 Western Australia 14.14.98 d South Australia 14.13.97: One of the most controversial State of Origin games, Western Australia came from 14 points down at the last break to win by a point. Late in the last quarter Western Australia was awarded a controversial free kick close to goal for holding the ball, and took the lead. With scores tied and seconds to go, a Western Australia player kicked a point on the run from outside 50, kicking the ball just before the siren went, to give Western Australia the lead.[35][36]

1994 South Australia 11.9 75 d Victoria 10.13.73: A game regarded as one of the greatest games in the history of Australian football.[37] In a close game, Tony Modra kicks six goals and Gary Ablett kicks four.

1986 South Australia 18.17.125 d Victoria 17.13 115: Is a high scoring game, where Stephen Kernahan, Grenville Dietrich, Dermott Brereton and Paul Salmon all kick 4 goals. The game also features John Platten, Tony McGuiness, Greg Williams, Dale Weightman and Chris McDermott.

1987 South Australia 12.13.85 d Victoria 11.15.81: South Australia get home in a close finish, in a game that features John Platten, Chris McDermott, Gary Ablett, Dermott Brereton and Tony McGuiness.

Croweaters in popular culture[edit]

There was a song created about South Australia, called "Came from Adelaide", which describes two people watching a game between South Australia and Victoria, when one person says "Those Croweaters just can't play" and the other person replies "That just isn't true, South Australians are great, as I'm about to tell you."[citation needed]

Carnival history[edit]

National Under 18 Championships[edit]

  • 7: 1978, 1979, 1980, 1991, 1995, 2013, 2014

Fos Williams Medal[edit]

The Fos Williams Medal was awarded to the best player from a South Australian team. The medal was first awarded in 1981.

Other state teams[edit]

The South Australian National Football League has a representative state team that plays annually against other state league teams. The South Australian Amateur Football League has a state team that plays annually against other state amateur league teams. There is also an Under 18 South Australian team that competes annually in the AFL Under 18 Championships. There is also a women's South Australian team that competes annually in the AFL Women's National Championships.

South Australia is also represented in the annual veterans' game, the E. J. Whitten Legends Game, by the All Stars team representing all states apart from Victoria.

References[edit]

  1. ^ SAfootballarchive (2012-03-06), 1988 State of Origin South Australia 15.12.102 d Victoria 6.6.42, retrieved 2016-03-02 
  2. ^ SAfootballarchive (2012-03-06), 1993 State of Origin Final South Australia 16.13.109 d Victoria 14.13.97, retrieved 2016-03-02 
  3. ^ "Cornes leads SANFL with pride in jumper at forefront". WA Football. Retrieved 2016-03-02. 
  4. ^ SAfootballarchive (2012-03-06), 1988 State of Origin South Australia 15.12.102 d Victoria 6.6.42, retrieved 2016-03-02 
  5. ^ SAfootballarchive (2012-03-06), 1992 State of Origin South Australia 19.19.133 d Victoria 18.12.120, retrieved 2016-03-02 
  6. ^ "The greatest State of Origin game ever, WA v Victoria '86". The Roar. Retrieved 2016-03-05. 
  7. ^ "Australian Football - West Coast Football Club - Stats". australianfootball.com. Retrieved 2016-03-02. 
  8. ^ "Australian Football - West Coast Football Club - Stats". australianfootball.com. Retrieved 2016-03-02. 
  9. ^ Adelaide Football Club (2013-08-19), Graham Cornes on Open Mike - 19 August 2013, retrieved 2016-03-02 
  10. ^ "Cornes leads SANFL with pride in jumper at forefront". WA Football. Retrieved 2016-03-02. 
  11. ^ Adelaide Football Club (2013-08-19), Graham Cornes on Open Mike - 19 August 2013, retrieved 2016-03-02 
  12. ^ "Australian Football - The+pride+of+South+Australia". australianfootball.com. Retrieved 2016-03-02. 
  13. ^ "Picking a SANFL All Stars team of the 1980s". The Roar. Retrieved 2016-03-02. 
  14. ^ Adelaide Football Club (2013-08-19), Graham Cornes on Open Mike - 19 August 2013, retrieved 2016-03-03 
  15. ^ aflonthetubes (2014-04-03), Open Mike (2014) - Neil Kerley, retrieved 2016-03-03 
  16. ^ "Subscribe to the Herald Sun". www.heraldsun.com.au. Retrieved 2016-03-03. 
  17. ^ "Digitised Resource Viewer". cedric.slv.vic.gov.au. Retrieved 2016-06-29. 
  18. ^ aflonthetubes (2014-04-03), Open Mike (2014) - Neil Kerley, retrieved 2016-06-29 
  19. ^ SAfootballarchive (2012-03-06), 1980 State of Origin Victoria 15.12.102 d South Australia 12.13.85, retrieved 2016-06-29 
  20. ^ Adelaide Football Club (2013-08-19), Graham Cornes on Open Mike - 19 August 2013, retrieved 2016-06-29 
  21. ^ Adelaide Football Club (2013-08-19), Graham Cornes on Open Mike - 19 August 2013, retrieved 2016-06-29 
  22. ^ AllStarAFL (2015-08-31), The Cornes Family on Open Mike (31 Aug 2015), retrieved 2016-06-29 
  23. ^ Lyon, Garry (2011-06-18). "No stopping the pick of the Vics". The Age. Retrieved 2016-06-29. 
  24. ^ "Digitised Resource Viewer". cedric.slv.vic.gov.au. Retrieved 2016-06-29. 
  25. ^ SAfootballarchive (2012-03-06), 1992 State of Origin South Australia 19.19.133 d Victoria 18.12.120, retrieved 2016-06-29 
  26. ^ "Digitised Resource Viewer". cedric.slv.vic.gov.au. Retrieved 2016-06-29. 
  27. ^ "Digitised Resource Viewer". cedric.slv.vic.gov.au. Retrieved 2016-07-01. 
  28. ^ "Digitised Resource Viewer". cedric.slv.vic.gov.au. Retrieved 2016-06-29. 
  29. ^ "Digitised Resource Viewer". cedric.slv.vic.gov.au. Retrieved 2016-06-29. 
  30. ^ "SA loses thrilling match - The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995) - 10 Jun 1984". Trove. Retrieved 2016-06-29. 
  31. ^ SAfootballarchive (2012-03-06), 1993 State of Origin South Australia 19.13.127 d Western Australia 13.7.85, retrieved 2016-07-01 
  32. ^ "The greatest State of Origin game ever, WA v Victoria '86". The Roar. Retrieved 2016-03-03. 
  33. ^ North Melbourne Football Club (2015-05-11), Wayne Carey feature - Part 1 (AFLPlayers.com.au), retrieved 2016-03-03 
  34. ^ The YouTube Rub (2014-05-31), 31/05/2014 The Origin of the Fraudulent Chief, retrieved 2016-03-03 
  35. ^ "SA loses thrilling match - The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995) - 10 Jun 1984". Trove. Retrieved 2016-06-30. 
  36. ^ SAfootballarchive (2012-03-06), 1984 State Game Western Australia 14.14.98 d South Australia 14.13.97, retrieved 2016-06-30 
  37. ^ Costa Sports (2015-04-08), That Was the Season that Was 1994 AFL, retrieved 2016-03-03 
  38. ^ http://www.fullpointsfooty.net/carnival_results.htm